StudioTulsa

Arts & Culture of interest to Northeastern Oklahoma

(Note: This show first aired back in March.) On this edition of ST, we speak with Cat Warren, a university professor and former journalist who for several years had an admittedly strange hobby -- that is, she and her German shepherd, Solo, would often go searching for the dead. Solo, now retired, was a cadaver dog -- and what began as an effort to make the best of Solo's unruly energy and boundless enthusiasm eventually became, for our guest today, a quest to learn all she could about so-called "working" dogs, their handlers, and their trainers.

On this installment of our show, an interesting discussion with Dr. Clark Elliott, an Associate Professor of Artificial Intelligence at DePaul University, who tells us about his new memoir, "The Ghost in My Brain: How a Concussion Stole My Life and How the New Science of Brain Plasticity Helped Me Get It Back." Back in 1999, Dr. Elliott suffered a concussion in a car wreck. His life changed instantly; he suddenly went from being a rising professor to a humbled man struggling to get through the day. At times he couldn't walk across a room, or open a door, or even name his children.

On this installment of ST, we speak with Jennifer Alden, the co-founder and co-director of the Tulsa-based dance company, Portico Dans Theatre. Aldren tells us about this company's latest production, which, per the Portico Dans Theatre website, "combines the drama of an opera ('Pagliacci') and the physicality of aerial dance in 'Pagliacci Project.' The production employs youth and adult dancers on aerial silks, lyra, trapeze, and the Spanish web.

On this edition of ST, we present a discussion with Steve Grantham, the executive director of Up With Trees. Started in 1976, this local nonprofit, as noted at its website, "has been faithful to its mission to beautify greater Tulsa by planting trees and creating urban forestry awareness through education.... In the last four decades, [Up With Trees has] planted over 30,000 trees at more than 500 sites throughout Tulsa. We plant along streets and trails, in parks, schools, fire stations, neighborhoods, and many other public properties....

One day in 1903, in the sandy, seaside Outer Banks of North Carolina, two unknown brothers from Ohio changed the direction of history. But it would take the world some time catch up with -- to both understand and appreciate -- what had happened that day. The age of flight had arrived, but its origin had been decidedly quiet, obscure, remote. And who exactly were Wilbur and Orville Wright, anyway? Our guest on ST is the distinguished American historian and biographer -- and two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize -- David McCullough, who joins us to talk about his newest book.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Lindsay Ketterer Gates, a Pennsylvania-based fiber artist who creates, as noted at her website, "slightly obsessive mixed-media work [that] springs from a background in and love of fiber techniques combined with a curiosity for all things purchased in bulk.

Our guest on ST via telephone is Nancy Pearl, our longtime book reviewer, a bestselling author, critic, editor, and retired librarian (and former citizen of Tulsa) who can also be heard regularly on NPR's Morning Edition. Now that the warm and sunny days of summer have finally arrived, Nancy joins us with a stack of favorites that ought to be perfect for that long trip in the car, endless airplane ride, idle day at the beach, lazy afternoon in the hammock, or all of the above.

On this installment of our show, a conversation with the distinguished historian and scholar, Robert Middlekauff, who is the Preston Hotchkis Professor of American History, Emeritus, at the University of California, Berkeley. Middlekauff -- whose earlier books include "The Mathers: Three Generations of Puritan Intellectuals, 1596–1728," which won the Bancroft Prize, and "The Glorious Cause: The American Revolution, 1763–1789," which was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize -- joins us to talk about his latest book, "Washington's Revolution: The Making of America's First Leader" (Knopf).

On this edition of ST, we present a discussion about a great new show at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa. "The Figure Examined: Masterworks from the Kasser Mochary Art Foundation" will on view through September 13th. Sarah Lees, the Ruth G. Hardman Curator of European Art at Philbrook -- and the curator for this exhibit -- joins us.

On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, guest host John Schumann speaks with James Walker, who's been the executive director of Youth Services of Tulsa (or YST) for 14 years now. A nonprofit United Way agency dating back to 1969, YST is, per its website, "committed to fostering a community atmosphere that values youth as resources. We provide innovative services and activities designed to increase self-discovery and instill positive core values and decision-making skills that will keep youth safe and allow them to lead healthy and productive lives.

Our guest on this edition of StudioTulsa is Timothy Dwyer, a writer whose work has appeared in Time, Washingtonian, and TheAtlantic.com.

Steve Inskeep, co-host of NPR's Morning Edition, is our guest today on StudioTulsa. He tells us all about his new book, "Jacksonland: President Andrew Jackson, Cherokee Chief John Ross, and a Great American Land Grab." As the noted historian H.W. Brands has observed of this book: "History is complicated, and in its complications lies its appeal. Steve Inskeep understands this, and his elegantly twinned account of Andrew Jackson and John Ross shows just how complicated and appealing history can be.

On this edition of ST, an interesting conversation with Dr. Margaret Martin, who more than a decade ago founded The Harmony Project, beginning with 36 students and a $9,000 check from The Rotary Club of Hollywood; today, The Harmony Project is the largest nonprofit in Los Angeles dedicated exclusively to music education for youth in low-income communities.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in January.) On this installment of ST, we speak by phone with Anthony Barnosky, a Professor of Integrated Biology at UC-Berkeley and a leading scientist specializing on how global change affects biodiversity and ecosystem function.

The John Hope Franklin Center for Reconciliation here in Tulsa will present its 2015 Symposium on Reconciliation next week, from May 26th through the 29th, and the theme for this year's gathering is "The Media and Reconciliation." Our guest on StudioTulsa will give an address at this symposium; Isabel Wilkerson -- who won a Pulitzer Prize for her work as Chicago Bureau Chief of The New York Times, and whose bestselling nonfiction account, "The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration," won the 2010 National Book Critics Circle Award for Nonfiction, the 2011 Heartlan

On this edition of ST, we speak with Christine Madrid French, a Florida-based architectural historian, historic preservation advocate, and author. (You can read about her many and various projects and publications as an architect with a passion for the past at French's website.) French will deliver a presentation called "Saving the Modern Century" tonight, Thursday the 21st, at 5:30pm at the Phlibrook Museum of Art.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we chat with the well-regarded Atlanta-based author, Jim Grimsley, who is best known for his novels "Winter Birds," "Dream Boy," and "My Drowning." Grimsley has a new memoir out, "How I Shed My Skin: Unlearning the Racist Lessons of a Southern Childhood," which he tells us about. In this book, which looks back on his rural 1960s North Carolina childhood, he writes: "White people declared that the South would rise again. Black people raised one fist and chanted for black power.

On this edition of ST, we're discussing an interesting new biography, "Jonas Salk: A Life." Our guest is Dr. Charlotte DeCroes Jacobs, the Shenson Professor of Medicine (Emerita) at Stanford University. Dr. Jacobs -- who's also the author of "Henry Kaplan and the Story of Hodgkin's Disease" -- remembers firsthand the polio scare of the middle 20th century, and thus also remembers Salk's widespread celebrity in this country; her heroic portrait of Salk was hailed as a "treasure trove of facts and stories" by Library Journal.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we're talking about an engaging and multi-faceted little art exhibit on view at TU's Zarrow Center for Art and Education (at 124 East Brady Street, in downtown Tulsa) through June 28th. "The Art of the Book" offers more than 20 works that both explore and encapsulate the book as an art form -- from hand-crafted miniature volumes to book-inspired sculptures to re-purposed "altered book" creations.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Jennifer Latham, a Tulsa-based author whose debut novel is coming out next week: "Scarlett Undercover" is a noir-flavored, modern-day YA mystery with a 16-year-old Muslim American heroine who runs her own detective agency. Book Smart Tulsa will present a free-to-the-public Launch Party for this book next week, on Wednesday the 20th at 7pm, at the University of Tulsa's Zarrow Center for Art and Education in the Brady Arts District (in downtown Tulsa).

On this edition of ST, a discussion of illegal trade on the global scale: from internet-driven piracy to the world's ports and shipping routes, from smuggling and trafficking to peddling counterfeit goods and knock-offs. Our guest is Dr. Suzette Grillot, Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma. She's served in this capacity since 2012, and she is also OU’s Vice Provost for International Programs as well as its William J. Crowe, Jr. Chair in Geopolitics.

Our guest on ST is cultural anthropologist Christina E. Burke, who is the Curator of Native American and Non-Western Art at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa.

On this edition of ST, we offer an interesting interview with John M. Kinder, an assistant professor of American studies and history at Oklahoma State University.

(Please note: This interview first aired back in February.) On this installment of ST, we speak by phone with the author and food-and-health blogger Andie Mitchell about her widely praised new autobiography, "It Was Me All Along." In naming this title a "Best Book of the Month" for January 2015, one critic at Amazon.com gushed: "Andie Mitchell is irresistible. And by that I mean she's irresistible no matter whether she weighs 268 (at the start of this delightful memoir) or 133 (by its end).

John Williams -- the still-active genius who created the music for such classic movies as "Jaws," "Star Wars," "Raiders of the Lost Ark," "Close Encounters of the Third Kind," "E.T.: The Extraterrestrial," and "Schindler's List" (to name just a handful) -- is arguably the greatest composer ever to work in Hollywood. And his memorable, broadly popular music will be the focal point for the final Tulsa Symphony Orchestra concert of this season.

On this installment of ST, we learn about "Red," an award-winning play about the Abstract Expressionist artist Mark Rothko that will soon be presented at the Williams Theater in the Tulsa PAC by the locally-based American Theatre Company. Our guest is Lisa Wilson, who is directing this production.

"God of Carnage," a Tony Award-winning play written about ten years ago by Yasmina Reza -- and translated from French into English by Christopher Hampton -- tells the story of two sets of parents who sit down together after the child of one couple injures the child of the other. The parents have arranged to meet so that they might resolve the matter in a peaceful and diplomatic matter -- yet things quickly (and hilariously) go from bad to worse as the conversation continues, and of course things only get uglier when the rum starts to flow.

On this edition of ST, we listen back to an interview that originally aired in June of last year. At that time, we had an interesting conversation with the British author and scholar Toby Wilkinson, a widely respected scholar of Egyptology.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Lynsey Addario, an award-winning American photojournalist whose work appears regularly in The New York Times, National Geographic, and Time magazine. Having covered conflicts in Afghanistan, Iraq, Darfur, the Congo, Haiti, and elsewhere, Addario is also the author of a well-regarded new autobiography, "It's What I Do: A Photographer's Life of Love and War," which Publishers Weekly has called "a highly readable and thoroughly engaging memoir....

On this installment of ST, we learn about a gorgeous new show at the Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa; "California Impressionism: Selections from The Irvine Museum" opens on Sunday (the 3rd) and runs through September 6th. Our guest is the curator for this traveling exhibition, Jean Stern, who is the founding executive director of The Irvine Museum (in Irvine, CA).

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