Art

(Note: This interview first aired earlier this year.) On this edition of ST, a discussion with the Pulitzer Prize-winning architectural critic Paul Goldberger, a contributing editor at Vanity Fair who spent fifteen years as the architecture writer for The New Yorker and previously wrote for The New York Times.

On this edition of our show, we speak with Steve McDonald, an artist and illustrator from Canada, about his new book, "Fantastic Cities: A Coloring Book of Amazing Places Real and Imagined." It's a striking collection of highly detailed line drawings depicting aerial views of real cities from around the world, both genuine and fictional. From New York, London, and Paris, to Istanbul, Tokyo, and Amsterdam, this large-format "coloring book for adults" combines arresting cityscapes with rather mind-bending and/or kaleidoscope-like close-ups of architectural details of all sorts.

"Untitled, 2015" by Joe Andoe

On this presentation of StudioTulsa, an enjoyable discussion with the acclaimed artist, Joe Andoe, who is based in New York City and grew up in Tulsa, and whose works are still very much informed by the look and feel of certain parts of our community. (Indeed, on our show today, he refers to East Tulsa as his "muse.") Andoe has a new exhibit on view in Tulsa, which opened last week at Aberson Exhibits on Brookside (near 35th and Peoria).

Have you noticed the enormous, vivid, and woven tapestry draping the entire front facade of the 108 Contemporary gallery in downtown Tulsa? It's an installation that's been hanging for a few weeks now, and it's entitled "The Unbearable Absence of Landscape." This vast piece -- made of panels created by hundreds of knitters all over the state with plastic yarn that, if unraveled, would stretch over 160 miles -- will have its official opening tonight (the 4th) at 6pm at 108 Contemporary as part of the First Friday Art Crawl in the Brady Arts District.

On this installment of ST, we speak with Nancy Friese, a visual artist and former Tulsan whose paintings, prints, and etchings are now on display in the Alexandre Hogue Gallery on the TU campus; this exhibit features beautifully rendered landscapes created in open-air settings in both Rhode Island and North Dakota. The show will be on view through December 17th.

On this edition of ST, a discussion with Patricia Goldstone, who has been a reporter for the Los Angeles Times, has written for The Washington Post and The Economist, and is also an award-winning playwright.

Our guest on ST is Dr. William D. Adams, who became the 10th Chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) last year. The NEH -- along with the National Endowment for the Arts -- is now marking its 50th anniversary, and thus Dr. Adams is making appearances all over the nation to celebrate the NEH's accomplishments while also explaining its goals, purposes, and various initiatives.

On this installment of ST, we learn about a vivid and exciting new exhibition at Philbrook, "In Living Color: Andy Warhol and Contemporary Printmaking from the Collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Family Foundation," which will be on view through January 17, 2016. Mr. Schnitzer is our guest today.

On this edition of ST, a discussion with the Pulitzer Prize-winning architectural critic Paul Goldberger, a contributing editor at Vanity Fair who spent fifteen years as the architecture writer for The New Yorker and began his career at The New York Times. Goldberger tells us about his new book, a widely praised biography entitled "Building Art: The Life and Work of Frank Gehry." As was noted in the pages of Architectural Digest, Goldberger is "a riveting storyteller and accomplished reporter . . .

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we learn about a newly opened exhibit at Gilcrease, "Painted Journeys: The Art of John Mix Stanley," which will be on view through January 3rd. As is noted of this show at the Gilcrease Museum website: "More than 150 years after his Smithsonian gallery burned to the ground, John Mix Stanley is receiving a long overdue retrospective exhibition.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Norbert Herber, a musician, sound artist, and Department of Telecommunications faculty member at Indiana University, who is presenting an art exhibition soon on the TU campus. This show, called "For the [ ] of the Loop," will be on view at the Hogue Gallery within the TU School of Art from October 2nd through the 29th.

On this installment of ST, we speak with the poet and performance/conceptual artist, Kenneth Goldsmith, who has appeared on The Colbert Report, held a poetry reading in the White House, and published more than ten books. He's also the first-ever poet laureate to be selected by The Museum of Modern Art -- and he'll offer a free-to-the-public poetry reading tonight, Tuesday the 22nd, at 9pm in Tyrell Hall on the TU campus.

On this installment of ST, we learn about the charmingly off-the-wall and/or downright ghoulish cartoons of Charles Addams, whose distictive, humorous drawings graced the pages of The New Yorker (and other magazines) for many years, and were the basis, of course, for "The Addams Family" (of TV and movie fame). More than 50 works by Addams are now on display at the Zarrow Center for Art and Education in downtown Tulsa; "Charles Addams: Family and Friends" will be on view through September 27th.

On this installment of ST, we speak with James Pepper Henry, who began his tenure as the executive director of the Gilcrease Museum about four months ago. As was recently reported by KWGS, Pepper Henry has requested $75 million out of  a proposed Vision 2025 sales-tax renewal.

Summertime...and the living is...cultured. On this edition of ST, we welcome Rand Suffolk back to the program. As the Director of the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa, Suffolk tells us about the various events and shows comprising that museum's "All-Star Summer." These include the exhibitions "The Figure Examined" and "The Art of Ceremony" -- both of which will be on view at the main Philbrook campus through early September -- and certain exhibits now happening (or coming soon) to the Philbrook Downtown space, among them a show that Suffolk himself curated.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Lindsay Ketterer Gates, a Pennsylvania-based fiber artist who creates, as noted at her website, "slightly obsessive mixed-media work [that] springs from a background in and love of fiber techniques combined with a curiosity for all things purchased in bulk.

On this edition of ST, we present a discussion about a great new show at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa. "The Figure Examined: Masterworks from the Kasser Mochary Art Foundation" will on view through September 13th. Sarah Lees, the Ruth G. Hardman Curator of European Art at Philbrook -- and the curator for this exhibit -- joins us.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we're talking about an engaging and multi-faceted little art exhibit on view at TU's Zarrow Center for Art and Education (at 124 East Brady Street, in downtown Tulsa) through June 28th. "The Art of the Book" offers more than 20 works that both explore and encapsulate the book as an art form -- from hand-crafted miniature volumes to book-inspired sculptures to re-purposed "altered book" creations.

On this installment of ST, we learn about "Red," an award-winning play about the Abstract Expressionist artist Mark Rothko that will soon be presented at the Williams Theater in the Tulsa PAC by the locally-based American Theatre Company. Our guest is Lisa Wilson, who is directing this production.

On this installment of ST, we learn about a gorgeous new show at the Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa; "California Impressionism: Selections from The Irvine Museum" opens on Sunday (the 3rd) and runs through September 6th. Our guest is the curator for this traveling exhibition, Jean Stern, who is the founding executive director of The Irvine Museum (in Irvine, CA).

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we learn about a show on view at the Philbrook Museum of Art through April 5th: "Whistler and the British Etching Revival." This small but engaging exhibition, culled from Philbrook's permanent collection, displays prints by James McNeill Whistler (1834-1903) and Francis Seymour Haden (1818-1910) -- who was Whistler's brother-in-law -- as well as similar works by several artists who came after these two.

On this installment of ST, we speak with Holcombe Waller, an award-winning musician and performance artist who is based in Portland, Oregon, and who will present a multimedia production entitled "Surfacing" tonight (Friday the 6th) and tomorrow night (Saturday the 7th) at the Liddy Doenges Theatre in the Tulsa PAC. Both shows begin at 8pm, and both are offered as part of the now-underway New Genre Festival XXII-A from Living Arts of Tulsa.

The 108 Contemporary gallery in the Brady Arts District in downtown Tulsa opened a new exhibit this past weekend that focuses on the growth and development of fiber art in America from roughly the 1950s onward. The show -- called "Innovators and Legends" -- runs through March 22nd. Our guest on ST is the curator for this exhibit, Geary Jones, who is himself a well-regarded fiber artist.

On today's ST, we are pleased to once again welcome Catherine Whitney, the Chief Curator and Curator of American Art at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa, who tells us about a fantastic new show on view at that museum called "New York to New Mexico: Masterworks of American Modernism from the Vilcek Foundation Collection." This show will run through May 3rd; more info can be accessed at the museum's website.

On this edition of ST, we welcome back Karen York, Director of Collections and Exhibitions at the Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art here in Tulsa. York tells us about two interesting exhibits at the museum that will close this coming weekend; the last day to view each show is Sunday the 1st.

On this edition of ST, we welcome James Warhola (born 1955), an American artist and illustrator who's created more than two dozen children's picture books over the years. Warhola briefly worked at Interview magazine in New York City -- which was established and edited by Andy Warhol, his uncle -- before becoming a science fiction illustrator. As such, beginning in the early 1980s, he did the cover art for hundreds of sci-fi books, and he was later an artist and illustrator for Mad magazine.

From now through February 26th, the nonprofit Living Arts of Tulsa (in the downtown Brady Arts District) will present "Speaking Volumes: Transforming Hate," a striking and wide-ranging exhibition collecting work by sixty different artists that first went on view in Helena, Montana, in 2008.

(Photo: Craig Smith / Heard Museum)

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with James Pepper Henry, director of the well-regarded Heard Museum in Phoenix, Arizona, who's just been named at the new director of the Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa. Pepper Henry will begin his tenure at Gilcrease in late March. He's a member of Oklahoma's Kaw Nation, and in a statement released on Monday the 5th, he referred to his upcoming arrival at Gilcrease as "a real homecoming.... I have lots of family and friends in Oklahoma. The museum's founder, Thomas Gilcrease, and I share Muscogee Creek heritage.

Alfred Hitchcock's longtime collaborator, Alexander Graham Bell's assistant, Vladimir Nabokov's wife, Muhammad Ali's first coach, Ernest Shackleton's right-hand man, John Wayne's stunt man, and the little-known sixth member of The Rolling Stones -- on this installment of ST, we're talking about some of the great "sidekicks" of modern history. Our guest is Julia Rothman, one of the editors of a new book called "The Who, the What, and the When: 65 Artists Illustrate the Secret Sidekicks of History," which is just out from Chronicle Books.

On this edition of our program, we are talking about the fascinating and far-reaching work of Dennis Oppenheim (1938-2011), the American conceptual artist, performance artist, earth artist, sculptor, photographer, and filmmaker. TU's School of Art will soon present a double-venued exhibition entitled "Dennis Oppenheim: Architecture/Not Architecture, Landscape/Not Landscape," which will be on view at the Alexandre Hogue Gallery (on the TU campus) as well as the Zarrow Center for Art and Education (in downtown Tulsa's Brady Arts District).

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