American Literature

(Note: This show first aired back in April.) Our guest is Bruce D. Haynes, a professor in the Department of Sociology at UC-Davis. He's the co-author of a new memoir, "Down the Up Staircase: Three Generations of a Harlem Family," which interestingly blends personal narrative, African-American social history, and the literary and academic cultures of Harlem and New York City.

On this edition of ST, we listen back to an interview from October of last year. At that time, we spoke with Jennifer Egan about her novel, "Manhattan Beach," which is just now out in paperback. As was noted of this book in a starred review in Kirkus: "After stretching the boundaries of fiction in myriad ways...Egan does perhaps the only thing left that could surprise: she writes a thoroughly traditional novel.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Richard Russo, the bestselling and Pulitzer Prize-winning author of such popular novels as Empire Falls and Nobody's Fool. Also known for his short stories and autobiographical writings, Mr. Russo has a new book out, his very first collection of personal essays, which he tells us about. It's called "The Destiny Thief." Note: Mr. Russo will soon do a free-to-the-public reading and signing here in Tulsa; on Thursday the 17th, beginning at 7pm, he'll be at the TCC Center for Creativity.

On this edition of ST, we offer a chat with Pam Muñoz Ryan, the prolific American writer for children and young adults who often produces books with multicultural and/or progressive themes. Ryan is the winner of the 2018 Anne V. Zarrow Award, which is given annually by the Tulsa Library Trust. Her 40 or so books include "Riding Freedom" (1998), "Esperanza Rising" (2000), "The Dreamer" (2010), and "Echo" (2015). She will appear here in Tulsa at a free-to-the-public event on Friday the 4th at the Hardesty Regional Library (which begins at 7pm).

On this edition of ST, we learn about the first-ever Tulsa Lit.Fest, an impressive array of free-to-the-public events that will happen here in our community from tomorrow (the 19th) through Sunday (the 22nd).

Our guest is Bruce D. Haynes, a professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of California, Davis. He's the co-author of a new memoir, "Down the Up Staircase: Three Generations of a Harlem Family," which interestingly blends personal narrative, African-American social history, and the literary and academic cultures of Harlem and New York City.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with the Austin-based, Montana-raised filmmaker Alex Smith, who's currently visiting TU in order to screen and answer questions about his feature film, "Walking Out." (The film will be shown tonight, the 13th, at the Lorton Performance Center; the screening is free to the public.) Smith and his twin brother Andrew work together on various film and TV projects, and "Walking Out" is their most recent movie.

Our guest is the writer and writing teacher Brandon Hobson, whose new novel, "Where the Dead Sit Talking," has just been published. Set in rural Oklahoma during the late 1980s, it's a spare, lyrical, and at times troubling story about a fifteen-year-old Cherokee boy who's been placed in foster care. As was noted of this book in a starred Publishers Weekly review: "Hobson's narrative control is stunning....

The author and journalist Mark Whitaker is our guest on StudioTulsa. A former managing editor of CNN Worldwide, and a previous Washington bureau chief for NBC News, Whitaker has a new book out, which he tells us about. It's an "expansive, prodigiously researched, and masterfully told history" (Kirkus Reviews) called "Smoketown: The Untold Story of the Other Great Black Renaissance." As was noted in an appreciation of this book in USA Today: "Pittsburgh was one of the country's citadels of black aspiration in music, sports, business, and culture.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Wyoming's own C.J. Box, who is the bestselling author of more than 20 novels, including the popular Joe Pickett series. A winner of the Edgar Alan Poe Award for Best Novel, the Gumshoe Award, the Western Heritage Award for Literature, and various other honors, Box is among the most popular writers at work today within the mystery/suspense/detective genre.

On this edition of ST, we listen back to our conversation from September with Jared Johnson, who's a fine drummer on the Tulsa-area music circuit as well as a drumset instructor at Northeastern State University. Jared gigs widely on the local scene, playing in all sorts of bands and musical settings, and mainly works as a jazz drummer.

On this edition of ST, we speak with the locally based poet, poetry teacher, and literary activist, Victoria McArtor. She tells us about her new book, "Reverse Selfie," which is a collection of poems written in response to -- or in conversation with, or in tribute to -- various Tulsa landmarks. This book, which actually began as a write-one-poem-every-day-for-a-month project back in 2015, also features striking photographs by Matthew Phipps, thereby capturing in both words and images the vitality, beauty, wonder, and strangeness of the City of Tulsa.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak once again with our longtime book reviewer, Nancy Pearl. A retired librarian, bestselling author, literary critic, and former Tulsan, Nancy, now based in Seattle, is a well-known reading advocate who was named the 2011 Librarian of the Year by Library Journal.

On this edition of ST, we speak with the well-regarded novelist and short-story writer Richard Ford, who is the recipient of the 2017 Peggy V. Helmerich Distinguished Author Award. Ford is the author of many critically acclaimed works of ficition, including "The Sportswriter," "Independence Day," and "Let Me Be Frank with You." His newest book, just out, is a memoir about his parents, which he discusses with us at length.

On this edition of our program, we chat with Eilis O'Neal, the editor-in-chief of TU's long-running literary publication, Nimrod International Journal. Nimrod will soon host its 2017 Write Night (tomorrow night, the 20th) at the Tulsa Garden Center, which will be followed (on the 21st) by the day-long Conference for Readers and Writers at the Allen Chapman Student Union. As we learn from Ms.

On this edition of ST, we chat with the New York-based author and journalist Jennifer Egan, whose newest novel, the much-praised "Manhattan Beach," is just out. As was noted of this book in a starred review in Kirkus: "After stretching the boundaries of fiction in myriad ways...Egan does perhaps the only thing left that could surprise: she writes a thoroughly traditional novel. Realistically detailed, poetically charged, and utterly satisfying: apparently there's nothing Egan can't do." And further, per Dwight Garner in The New York Times: "Immensely satisfying....

On this installment of our show, an in-depth discussion with the novelist Tom Perrotta, whose books include "Election" and "Little Children" (both of which were made into well-regarded films). Perrotta has a new novel out, titled "Mrs. Fletcher," and he tells us about it on today's program. As was noted of this book in a front-page appreciation in The New York Times Book Review: "[This book], Perrotta's seventh novel and first since 2011's "The Leftovers," operates and succeeds in ways that will be pleasingly familiar to his admirers.

On this edition of ST, we are pleased to welcome the noted book critic, editor, and retired librarian Nancy Pearl back to our show. A former Tulsan, she's also the longtime book reviewer for this program, and she can be heard talking about books from time to time on NPR's Morning Edition. Nancy has a new novel out -- it's her first, and it's called "George and Lizzie" -- and it was thus praised by Booklist (in a starred review): "Pearl dramatizes a complicated and deeply illuminating union of opposites and conducts profound inquiries into the self, family, empathy, and love.

On this episode of ST, we welcome Jared Johnson to the show. He's an active drummer on the Tulsa-area music scene as well as a drumset instructor at Northeastern State University. Jared gigs widely on the local scene, playing in all sorts of bands and musical settings, and mainly works as a jazz drummer.

On this edition of ST, we welcome the Tulsa-based author Jennifer Latham back to our show. Her recently published YA novel, "Dreamland Burning," is a suspenseful narrative about the Tulsa Race Riot. As was noted of this book in an appreciative review from School Library Journal: "Latham follows up 'Scarlett Undercover' with a rich work that links past and present in a tale that explores racial prejudice. After the remains of a skeleton are found in her Tulsa, OK, backyard, 17-year-old Rowan Chase becomes consumed with finding out the story behind the death.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in April.) On this installment of ST, the bestselling writer Jonathan Lethem is our guest. He's known for such celebrated novels as "Dissident Gardens," "The Fortress of Solitude," and "Motherless Brooklyn." He joins us to discuss his latest book, which is a gathering of nonfiction pieces. It's called "More Alive and Less Lonely: On Books and Writers," and it's an impressive collection of 50+ essays, some of them previously published and some newly written.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in May.) We speak with the New Mexico-based writer and biographer James McGrath Morris, who joins us to discuss his newest work: "The Ambulance Drivers: Hemingway, Dos Passos, and a Friendship Made and Lost in War." As was noted of this historical biography by the New York Journal of Books: "[This book] delves head-first into the mercurial relationship of these two American literary legends....

Our guest on this edition of StudioTulsa is Daniel Wilson, the bestselling sci-fi writer and Tulsa native (and TU alum) whose new novel, just out, is called "The Clockwork Dynasty." (Please note that Wilson will soon be reading from this book, and signing copies of it, at a Book Smart Tulsa event here in our community.) As was noted of this novel in The Los Angeles Review of Books: "Wilson is one of the foremost prophets of the near future.... In 'The Clockwork Dynasty,' the irrepressibly readable Wilson has retreated to pseudo-vampiric sentient robots.

(Note: This program first aired back in January.) On this edition of ST, we speak with Randall Fuller, the Chapman Professor of English here at TU.

(Note: This program originally aired last year.) Is technology taking over and/or fundamentally changing and/or worsening our lives? It's a debatable question...or series of questions...but, for whatever it's worth, there ARE more and more books and novels and TV shows these days in which technological devices are taking over, changing, or even, yes, worsening our lives as human beings.

On this installment of ST, we speak with the New Mexico-based writer and biographer James McGrath Morris, who is the author of (among other books) the bestselling "Eye on the Struggle: Ethel Payne, The First Lady of the Black Press." Morris joins us to discuss his newest work, which is just out: "The Ambulance Drivers: Hemingway, Dos Passos, and a Friendship Made and Lost in War." As was noted of this historical biography by the New York Journal of Books: "[This book] delves head-first into the mercurial relationship of these two American literary legends....

On this installment of ST, the bestselling writer Jonathan Lethem is our guest. He's well-known for such celebrated novels as "Dissident Gardens," "The Fortress of Solitude," and "Motherless Brooklyn." He joins us to discuss his latest book, just out now, which is a gathering of nonfiction pieces. It's called "More Alive and Less Lonely: On Books and Writers." It's an impressive collection of 50+ essays, some of them previously published and some newly written.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Randall Fuller, the Chapman Professor of English here at TU. He joins us to discuss his new book, "The Book That Changed America: How Darwin's Theory of Evolution Ignited a Nation." As the historian Eric Foner recently wrote of this book in The New York Times: "Fuller...is [previously] the author of a prize-winning study of the Civil War's impact on American literature.

On this installment of ST, we speak with Nancy Pearl, our longtime book reviewer. She's a Seattle-based bestselling author and retired librarian, and she used to work as a bookseller (decades ago) here in Tulsa. A tireless book advocate and literary critic -- and perhaps the only librarian ever to be fashioned and sold as an action figure -- Nancy can also be heard occasionally recommending books on NPR's Morning Edition. She talked with us about the following titles, all of which she thinks would make great gifts this holiday season:

On this edition of ST, we welcome Billy Collins back to our show. He is the winner of the Tulsa Library Trust's 2016 Peggy V. Helmerich Distinguished Author Award, and he'll be reading from his work at an event here in Tulsa on Saturday the 3rd at the downtown Central Library. (This event begins at 10:30am and is free to the public.) Known and loved by readers everywhere for his accessible, conversational, clearly rendered, and often witty poems, Collins has been called "the most popular poet in America" by The New York Times.

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