American History

"Watergate: A Novel" (Encore presentation.)

Jul 8, 2013

(Please note: This program originally aired earlier this year.) On this installment of our show, we speak by phone with the writer, critic, and journalist Thomas Mallon, whose critically acclaimed novels include "Henry and Clara" and "Dewey Defeats Truman." Mallon frequently writes for The New Yorker, The New York Times Book Review, and The Atlantic, and his newest novel, now out in paperback, is "Watergate." Hailed as "wildly entertaining from beginning to end" (Fort Worth Star-Telegram) and "a brilliant presentation, subtle and sympathetic but spiked with satire" (The Washington Post), th

The issue of slavery was, of course, at the heart of the American Civil War --- but have you ever wondered why this country fought a four-year, deeply tragic war over the issue, while many other nations (during basically the same historical period) did away with slavery without going to war? We're pleased to welcome to our show the historian Thomas Fleming, who has written more than 50 books and often appears as a commentator on PBS, A&E, and the History Channel.

For this encore presentation of our show, we look back on a remarkable year in the tenure  of our nation's greatest president, Abraham Lincoln. Our guest is journalist David Von Drehle, author of "Rise to Greatness: Abraham Lincoln and America's Most Perilous Year." Von Drehle argues that the truly pivotal year of the American Civil War was 1862 --- not 1863, as many historians have asserted. As 1862 opens, the war is going badly, Lincoln's own advisors are questioning his leadership, European powers are openly considering intervening on behalf of the South, the U.S.

On this edition of ST we are pleased to speak by phone with Steve Vogel, a veteran national reporter for The Washington Post as well as the author of "The Pentagon: A History" (2008).

On this edition of our show, we speak with the author and journalist Denise Kiernan, whose writing has appeared in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Village Voice, Discover, Ms., and many other publications. She's written a number of books for adults and children, and has also worked as a producer for ESPN, MSNBC, and other media outlets.

(Please note: This show originally aired earlier this year.) When we say that someone is a "tinkerer," we might be offering a word of praise...or a put-down. Today's edition of ST explores the positive definition of the term "tinkerer," as a creative inventor or innovator.

On this installment of our show, we speak by phone with the writer, critic, and journalist Thomas Mallon, whose critically acclaimed novels include "Henry and Clara" and "Dewey Defeats Truman." Mallon frequently writes for The New Yorker, The New York Times Book Review, and The Atlantic, and his newest novel, just out in paperback, is "Watergate." Hailed as "wildly entertaining from beginning to end" (Fort Worth Star-Telegram) and "a brilliant presentation, subtle and sympathetic but spiked with satire" (The Washington Post), this novel was named a New York Times Notable Book as well as a S

Our guest on this installment of ST is Richard Blackett, the Andrew Jackson Professor of History at Vanderbilt University, who joins us by phone.

"Abraham Lincoln and America's Most Perilous Year"

Feb 19, 2013

For this installment of ST, on the day after Presidents' Day, we are looking back on the war-torn tenure of our nation's greatest president, Abe Lincoln. Our guest is the author and journalist David Von Drehle, whose widely acclaimed and most recent book, "Rise to Greatness: Abraham Lincoln and America's Most Perilous Year," was named one of the Kansas City Star's Top 100 Books of 2012.

When we say that someone is a "tinkerer," we might be offering a word of praise...or a put-down. Today's edition of ST explores the positive definition of the "tinkerer," as a creative inventor or innovator.

Our guest on this installment of StudioTulsa is Robert Caro, the widely celebrated historian and biographer whose detailed, tirelessly researched writings have been awarded the Pulitzer Prize (twice), the National Book Critics Circle Award, the National Book Award, and the Francis Parkman Prize, among other honors. Tomorrow night, Tuesday the 12th, he'll deliver a Presidential Lecture in the Allen Chapman Activity Center here on the TU campus. The lecture begins at 7:30pm and is free to the public. (The Presidential Lecture Series is sponsored by TU's Darcy O'Brien Endowed Chair.) Mr.

Talk about the influential use of language.... Did you know that "bloviate," "lunatic fringe," "iffy," "military-industrial complex," "Anglophobia," "public relations," and "ottoman" are all terms or phrases that have been either coined or popularized by various U.S. Presidents over the years?

On this "best of" edition of our show, we're listening back to a discussion we had by phone last year with Jack Hitt, who's a contributing editor to The New York Times Magazine, Harper's, and public radio's This American Life.

On this "best of" edition of our show, we're listening back to a discussion from earlier this year with Professor David Blight, the acclaimed Civil War historian based at Yale University.

The Best of ST in 2012: "Panther Baby"

Jan 2, 2013

On this "best of" edition of our show, we're listening back to a discussion from earlier this year with the author and activist Jamal Joseph. Joseph's autobiography, "Panther Baby: A Life of Rebellion and Reinvention," is the focal point of our chat; it's an engrossing hybrid of coming-of-age candor, street-savvy wisdom, and recent socio-political history.

On this edition of ST, we are joined by Michelle Wilde Anderson, an Assistant Professor at the UC-Berkeley School of Law and a Visiting Assistant Professor at the Stanford Law School. She'll deliver the Sixth Annual Judge Stephanie K. Seymour Lecture in Law at the University of Tulsa College of Law tonight, Wednesday the 12th, at 6pm.

How many cigarettes are sold each year, worldwide? Believe it or not, six trillion. Our guest, who calls the cigarette "the deadliest artifact in the history of human civilization," was the first-ever historian, several years ago, to testify in court against Big Tobacco. On this installment of ST, which first aired earlier this year, we speak with Robert N. Proctor, Professor of the History of Science at Stanford University.

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with Eric Jay Dolin, the bestselling author and award-winning popular historian whose previous books include "Fur, Fortune, and Empire: The Epic History of the Fur Trade in America" and "Leviathan: The History of Whaling in America." Dolin's new book, which he discusses with us today, is "When America First Met China: An Exotic History of Tea, Drugs, and Money in the Age of Sail." On this Election Day, after so much stump-speech rhetoric concerning (among several other topics) "getting tough on China," we are taking the long view, so to speak, on thi

On this edition of ST, we welcome Dr. Nicholas Carnes, an Assistant Professor of Public Policy at the Sanford School of Public Policy at Duke University. He's a 2006 graduate of The University of Tulsa; in 2011, he received a doctorate in Politics and Social Policy at Princeton University. Last week, Dr. Carnes presented two lectures as part of TU's Distinguished Alumni Lectureship in Law and Politics. The talks he delivered were entitled "What's the Matter with Law School?

Our guest on this installment of ST is Dr. Stuart Rockoff, who will give the annual Cadenhead-Settle Lecture --- presented by TU's Department of History every fall --- tomorrow night (Wednesday the 24th) here on the University of Tulsa campus. The lecture will begin at 7pm in the Tyrrell Hall Auditorium; it's entitled "Bagels and Grits: How Jews Found a Home in the South." Dr. Rockoff is Director of the History Department at the Goldring/Woldenberg Institute of Southern Jewish Life in Jackson, Mississippi.

On this edition of ST, a reappraisal of U.S. Grant; we are pleased to welcome back to our show the bestselling author and acclaimed historian H.W. Brands, who's also the Dickson Allen Anderson Professor of History at the University of Texas at Austin. In an event co-presented by Book Smart Tulsa and the Gilcrease Museum, Prof. Brands will present a reading/signing/discussion of his newest book, "The Man Who Saved the Union: Ulysses Grant in War and Peace," at Gilcrease on Thursday of this week (the 25th) at 7pm.

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with James B. Steele. He and Donald L. Barlett are the nation's most honored investigative reporting team, having worked together for more than four decades. Now based at Vanity Fair magazine, Barlett and Steele are the only reporting team ever to have received two Pulitzer Prizes for newspaper reporting and two National Magazine Awards for magazine work. (Per the Columbia Journalism Review: "Barlett and Steele's preeminent talent is their knack for combining the micro and the macro. They look systemically at issues and policies, from the U.S.

Our guest on this edition of StudioTulsa is Jeremy Kuzmarov, the Jay P.

Last week, the GOP held its National Convention. This week, the Democratic Party will have its turn. And with the presidential campaign now in full gear, American politics --- and the two-party system at the heart of those politics --- is now, more or less, on just about everyone's mind.

(Please note that this show first aired back in May.) What do we mean when we call someone an "amateur"? What are we saying? As it happens, there are many answers to this question. On this edition of ST, we speak with Jack Hitt, a contributing editor to The New York Times Magazine, Harper’s, and public radio’s This American Life.

"Some folks look at me and see a certain swagger," the former President George W. Bush once remarked to an appreciative audience, "which, in Texas, is called 'walking.'" It's pretty clear to just about everyone that the State of Texas sees itself as a breed apart in many ways, and for many reasons; Texans, as a rule, seem to consider their home state an exceptional, singular, not-to-be-messed-with place.

How many cigarettes are sold each year, worldwide? Believe it or not, six trillion. Our guest, who calls the cigarette "the deadliest artifact in the history of human civilization," was the first-ever historian, several years ago, to testify in court against Big Tobacco. On this installment of our show, we speak by phone with Robert N. Proctor, Professor of the History of Science at Stanford University.

File Photo

"1913 Massacre" is the name of a song that Woody Guthrie wrote circa 1941; it recounts an early-20th-century tragedy that happened at the Italian Hall building in Calumet, Michigan, on Christmas Eve of 1913, when hundreds of miners, along with their families and friends, had gathered for a party. At that time, Calumet was at the heart of Michigan's then-lucrative copper-mining activity.

Tomorrow, of course, is the Fourth of July, America's birthday. But, in the meantime, today (July 3rd) is the 149th anniversary of Pickett's Charge, the failed Confederate infantry assault on the final day of the Battle of Gettysburg: the unsuccessful attack (named for Maj. Gen. George Pickett) that's now basically seen as the beginning of the end of the Southern war effort.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we're joined by Elizabeth Chambers, the collections manager for the Mount Vernon Estate, Museum, and Gardens, who's currently in town to help set-up a show opening at the Gilcrease Museum on Sunday the 24th. It's a traveling exhibit, "Discover the Real George Washington: New Views from Mount Vernon," that will be on view at Gilcrease through September 23rd. What do we know, for certain, about "the Father of Our Country"?

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