American History

Our guest is Betty Medsger, an author and former journalist whose latest book, "The Burglary: The Discovery of J. Edgar Hoover's Secret FBI," is just out in paperback. As a critic for The Wall Street Journal has noted, this is "an important work, the definitive treatment of an unprecedented and largely forgotten 'act of resistance' that revealed shocking official criminality in postwar America. One need not endorse break-ins as a form of protest to welcome this deeply researched account of the burglary at Media, Penn. Ms.

On this edition of ST, we're pleased to welcome the widely popular and bestselling nonfiction author Bill Bryson. Appreciated for his likable tone, his sly humor, his love of travel, and his gifts as both a storyteller and a history buff, Bryson is the author of "A Walk in the Woods," "Notes from a Small Island," "A Short History of Nearly Everything," "Made in America," and so forth.

On this installment of ST, an interesting chat with Laura Auricchio, a specialist in eighteenth-century French history and art who's received fellowships from the Fulbright Foundation, the Whiting Foundation, and Columbia University -- and who's also Dean of the School of Undergraduate Studies at The New School in NYC. Auricchio speaks about her new book, "The Marquis: Lafayette Reconsidered," which was called "a sharp and moving biography" in a starred review in Kirkus.

(Note: This show first aired in June.) On this installment of ST, we speak with Rachel Urquhart, a writer whose work has been published in The New Yorker, Tin House, Elle, The New York Times, Vogue, and Spy, among other publications. Urquhart has recently published her first novel, "The Visionist," which is a widely acclaimed historical drama about a teenage girl who finds refuge --- or perhaps does not find refuge --- in an 1840s Shaker community.

(Note: This show originally aired in June.) Our guest on this edition of ST is Michael Blanding, an author and magazine writer who's also a senior fellow at the Schuster Institute for Investigative Reporting at Brandeis University.

On this presentation of ST, we welcome Karen Abbott, the bestselling author of "Sin in the Second City" and other books, whom USA Today has called a "pioneer of sizzle history." Abbott joins us by phone to talk about her newest volume, which tells the strange-but-true stories of four different women who risked everything to become spies, combatants, or informants during the Civil War. The book is "Liar, Temptress, Soldier, Spy: Four Women Undercover in the Civil War," and it's just out from Harper.

On this installment of ST, we speak with the award-winning Canadian actor, playwright, and humorist Rick Miller, who will present his one-man show, "Boom," on Saturday the 20th at 7:30pm at the Tulsa PAC's Williams Theatre. As Miller tells us by phone, his 100-minute production offers a sweeping, fascinating, and maybe even educational exploration of the Baby Boomer generation -- from Che Guevara to Janis Joplin, from Buddy Holly to Nikita Khrushchev, and from Walter Cronkite to Martin Luther King, Jr.

The Univeristy of Tulsa's free-to-the-public Presidential Lecture Series, sponsored by the Darcy O'Brien Endowed Chair, will soon get underway here on the TU campus. The first lecture in this annual series, scheduled for tomorrow night (Wednesday the 3rd) at 7:30pm at the Donald W. Reynolds Center, will feature the acclaimed author and journalist Charles C. Mann, whose work has appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, Vanity Fair, National Geographic, The Atlantic Monthly, and elsewhere.

The "Rediscover Gilcrease" weekend -- a two-day, free-to-the-public gala happening at the museum on September 6th and 7th -- will feature unique attractions, special activities, and lots of family-friendly entertainment. Among the highlights, without question, will be the official opening of the striking new Helmerich Center for American Research at Gilcrease. Several different lectures and presentations will be presented at the Helmerich Center, and one of them will be given by our guest today. Our guest is Brian Hosmer, the H.G.

We at StudioTulsa have been enjoying some much-cherished vacation time these past two weeks -- and hopefully you, dear listeners, have likewise enjoyed our Encore Presentations of ST for the weeks of August 4th and August 11th. If you'd like to listen to any of these past programs, you'll find audio-stream buttons for them at the following links.

Photo by Matt Herron

Fifty years ago, in 1964 -- during what would come to be called Freedom Summer in the American South -- a young photographer named Matt Herron, who'd recently relocated to Mississippi from the North (with his wife and kids) in order to work on civil rights issues while also shooting photo-stories for Life, Look, and The Saturday Evening Post, put together a group of talented photographers that was known as the Southern Documentary Project.

US Supreme Court

While the Hobby Lobby contraceptives case made most of the headlines, the U.S. Supreme Court term, which concluded yesterday, also rendered important decisions in 1st Amendment free-speech rights, 4th Amendment search-and-seizure laws, copyright law, the limit of presidential powers, federal election law, and affirmative action. Our guest on this edition of StudioTulsa is constitutional scholar Lyn Entzeroth, the Associate Dean of the University of Tulsa College of Law, where she is also Professor of Law.

On this installment of ST, we speak with Rachel Urquhart, a writer whose work has been published in The New Yorker, Tin House, Elle, The New York Times, Vogue, and Spy, among other publications. Urquhart has recently published her first novel, "The Visionist," which is a widely acclaimed historical drama about a teenage girl who finds refuge --- or perhaps does not find refuge --- in an 1840s Shaker community.

On this installment on ST, we chat with Steve Gerkin, who is originally from Iowa, has lived in Tulsa for more than 35 years, retired from his general dentistry practice in 2010, and has written a number of interesting articles for This Land Press about little-known aspects of Tulsa-area history. Gerkin has gathered several of these articles into a book, "Hidden History of Tulsa," which has just been published.

Our guest on this edition of ST is Michael Blanding, an author and magazine writer who's also a senior fellow at the Schuster Institute for Investigative Reporting at Brandeis University. Blanding tells us about his newest book, just out, which is "The Map Thief: The Gripping Story of an Esteemed Rare-Map Dealer Who Made Millions Stealing Priceless Maps." As was appreciatively noted of this title by Kirkus Reviews, "The Map Thief" profiles the "strange, mysterious world of rare maps --- and the even stranger mystery of the man who stole them for years without getting caught.

(Note: This interview first aired earlier this year.) We speak by phone with Molly Knight Raskin, a freelance journalist whose work has appeared in Psychology Today, The Washington Post, The Baltimore Sun, and elsewhere; her TV credits include two PBS documentaries. Raskin is also the author of "No Better Time: The Brief, Remarkable Life of Danny Lewin, the Genius Who Transformed the Internet," which The Daily Beast has hailed as "a fascinating biography, but...also a history of the Internet and those who took it from clunky dial-up service to the speed-of-light marvel.

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with Adam Makos: a longtime journalist and military historian who's also the editor of the military-themed magazine, Valor. Makos is likewise the co-author of the bestselling nonfiction account, "A Higher Call: An Incredible True Story of Combat and Chivalry in the War-Torn Skies of World War II," which is just recently out in paperback.

Our guest on ST is Anne Hyde, the William R. Hochman Professor of History at Colorado College. She'll be giving the 2014 H.G. Barnard Distinguished Lecture, which is presented annually by the TU Department of History, tonight (Tuesday the 25th) at the Gilcrease Museum Auditorium here in Tulsa. The lecture begins at the 7pm and is free to the public. Prof. Hyde, who mainly teaches courses on the history of Native America as well as that of North America, received her A.B. degree in American Studies from Mount Holyoke College and her M.A.

On this edition of our show, in honor of Presidents' Day, we revisit, and reassess, an American leader who's seen by many as a brilliant general but a rather less-than-brilliant president. Today's ST is an encore presentation of an interesting discussion that we first aired in October 2012. At that time, we chatted with the bestselling author and acclaimed historian, H.W. Brands, who's the Dickson Allen Anderson Professor of History at the University of Texas at Austin. We spoke with Prof.

"Here Is Where: Discovering America's Great Forgotten History"

Jan 24, 2014

On this edition of ST, an interesting chat with Andrew Carroll, a writer and historian best known for the Legacy Project, which he created, and which tirelessly archives wartime correspondence as culled from across the nation; Carroll is also known for "War Letters," a bestselling book which he edited, and which inspired an acclaimed PBS documentary.

On this edition of The Best of StudioTulsa, we're listening back to our chat with A. Scott Berg, whose bestselling, highly regarded biographies include "Max Perkins: Editor of Genius" (winner of the National Book Award), "Goldwyn," "Lindbergh" (winner of the Pulitzer Prize), and "Kate Remembered." Berg's newest book is a life of America's 28th President, Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924) --- it's titled simply "Wilson" --- and the Ft. Worth Star-Telegram calls it "a work of spectacular artistry and objective workmanship....

On this installment of ST, we speak by phone with Dr. Richard Kurin, the Smithsonian Institution's Under Secretary for History, Art, and Culture, who oversees most of the organization's various museums as well as many of its educational programs. An anthropologist and cultural historian by training, and a former Fulbright fellow with a doctorate from the University of Chicago, Dr.

(Please note: This show first aired earlier this year.) Our guest is the celebrated American author, Philip Caputo, who was a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist in Chicago before going on to write several notable works of fiction, nonfiction, and memoir, including 1977's "A Rumor of War," one of the most highly praised and widely read volumes ever published on the Vietnam War.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we speak by phone with A. Scott Berg, whose bestselling, highly regarded biographies include "Max Perkins: Editor of Genius" (winner of the National Book Award), "Goldwyn," "Lindbergh" (winner of the Pulitzer Prize), and "Kate Remembered." Berg's newest book is a life of America's 28th President, Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924) --- it's titled simply "Wilson" --- which the Ft. Worth Star-Telegram has called: "A work of spectacular artistry and objective workmanship....

Our guest is Ari Kelman, an Associate Professor of History at the University of California at Davis. Prof. Kelman discusses his interesting new book, "A Misplaced Massacre: Struggling Over the Memory of Sand Creek," which was published earlier this year by Harvard University Press. As we read of this volume at the Harvard U.

On this edition of ST, we welcome Linda Barnickel, a former Tulsa resident with master's degrees from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and The Ohio State University who now works as an archivist, researcher, and writer in Nashville. She's also the author of "Milliken's Bend: A Civil War Battle in History and Memory" (LSU Press). In June of 1863, on the banks of the mighty Mississippi, at Milliken's Bend, Louisiana, a Union force composed mainly of former slaves met their Confederate foes in one of the most vicious --- and most "hand-to-hand" --- small battles of the entire Civil War.

On this edition of our show, we chat with Jim Murphy, winner of the 2013 Anne V. Zarrow Award for Young Readers' Literature, which is presented annually by the Tulsa Library Trust. Murphy will be given this award on Friday the 23rd at 7pm at Gilcrease Museum; he will then offer a 10am reading/talk/signing, on Saturday the 24th, as part of the TCCL's Young People's Creative Writing Contest Awards Presentation, which will happen at the Hardesty Regional Library.

Our guest is the celebrated American author, Philip Caputo, who was a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist in Chicago before going on to write several notable works of fiction, nonfiction, and memoir, including 1977's "A Rumor of War," one of the most highly praised and widely read volumes ever published on the Vietnam War.

Two years ago, in the summer of 2011, "Whitey" Bulger was arrested. Today, his criminal trial continues, not far from the South Boston neighborhood where he robbed banks as a young punk and then rose through the ranks to become the infamous gangster known and feared by so many; it now seems that Bulger, in his 80s and surely one of the most powerful and deadly crime bosses in American history, has finally seen his terrible past catch up with him.

"Watergate: A Novel" (Encore presentation.)

Jul 8, 2013

(Please note: This program originally aired earlier this year.) On this installment of our show, we speak by phone with the writer, critic, and journalist Thomas Mallon, whose critically acclaimed novels include "Henry and Clara" and "Dewey Defeats Truman." Mallon frequently writes for The New Yorker, The New York Times Book Review, and The Atlantic, and his newest novel, now out in paperback, is "Watergate." Hailed as "wildly entertaining from beginning to end" (Fort Worth Star-Telegram) and "a brilliant presentation, subtle and sympathetic but spiked with satire" (The Washington Post), th

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