American History

On this edition of ST, a compelling discussion with Ari Berman, a political correspondent for The Nation whose writing has also appeared in The New York Times and Rolling Stone (and who is a frequent commentator on MSNBC and NPR). We are discussing Berman's widely acclaimed book, "Give Us the Ballot: The Modern Struggle for Voting Rights in America," which first appeared last summer and will be published in paperback early next month.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Tulsa native and longtime New Yorker Magazine writer Mark Singer, whose latest book is called "Trump and Me." It's based in large part on a profile of the real estate mogul that Singer wrote for the magazine 20 years ago, and it's just out Tim Duggan Books / Penguin Random House.

On this installment of ST, we speak with Dr. Bob Pickering, a Professor of Anthropology in the Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences here at TU. Dr. Pickering is also the curator for a new exhibit at Gilcrease Museum; "West Mexico: Ritual and Identity" will be on view through November 6th. It's a show that, per the Gilcrease website, "will feature a spectacular selection of ceramic figures and vessels from the Gilcrease collection, augmented by items from public and private collections....

On this installment of ST, we speak with the corporate lawyer, conservation leader, and author Frederic C. Rich. His new book, just out, is called "Getting to Green" -- it argues for a new bipartisan coalition in American politics and culture in order to fix the ongoing (and basically nonfunctioning) mess that is the current Green Movement in the US.

(Note: This interview originally aired last summer.) Our guest is the author and former journalist Rinker Buck, whose book, "Flight of Passage," was praised by The New Yorker as "a funny, cocky gem." Buck's latest book, which he talks with us about, is "The Oregon Trail: A New American Journey." In this bestselling work, the author and his brother travel the original trail -- over some 2,000 miles -- from St. Joseph, Missouri, to Baker City, Oregon. It's a journey made by mule-pulled wagon, no less -- like the pioneers did, a century ago -- and it lasts four months.

(Note: This show originally aired back in January.) Our guest on ST is Edward B. Foley, the Ebersold Chair in Law and Director of Election Law at the Ohio State University School of Law. Professor Foley tells us about his new book, "Ballot Battles: A History of Disputed Elections in the U.S." As was noted of this title by Tamara Keith, a correspondent for NPR News: "It's hard not to feel outrage and a little dread reading Edward Foley's retelling of ballot battles dating back to the nation's founding.

(Note: This show originally aired back in November.) We speak with the author and journalist John Sedgwick, whose many books range from a psychological thriller, "The Dark House," to a multi-generational family memoir, "In My Blood." He joins us to talk about his newest book, a work of popular history entitled "War of Two: Alexander Hamilton, Aaron Burr, and the Duel That Stunned the Nation." Interestingly, Sedgwick has an ancestor who actually knew both Hamilton and Burr quite well, and it was his own research into the life and work of that ancestor which first led Sedgwick to think of wri

(Note: This program originally aired in June of last year.) On this installment of StudioTulsa, we speak by phone with Thomas Fleming, a prolific historian and historical novelist who has contributed articles to American Heritage, MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History, and other magazines -- and who has written more than 50 books.

On this installment of ST, we listen back to great discussion from May of last year, when we spoke with Steve Inskeep, co-host of National Public Radio's Morning Edition.

Late one night in 2011, a large animal collided with an SUV on a Connecticut parkway. This animal was not a deer -- as is, sadly, so often the case. It was a 140-pound mountain lion...and it had been born in the Black Hills of South Dakota...in 2009!

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