American Education

The Arts and Humanities Council of Tulsa will now be known as AHHA Tulsa. As per the AHHA website: "The organization's Board of Directors voted recently to change the name to something modern that encompasses the organization's mission to cultivate creativity in Tulsa, while also honoring its decades-long history.

Our guest today is Lee Gordon, the 2018 Laureate of the Brock Prize in Education. Gordon is the founder of Hand in Hand: The Center for Jewish-Arab Education in Israel. This Israeli non-profit organization has created a network of integrated, bi-lingual public schools serving Arab and Jewish children alike. Starting with just 50 students in 1998, as we learn on today's StudioTulsa, Hand in Hand by now has six campuses. It also has, more to the point, some 1,600 or so students who belive in Jewish-Arab partnership and coexistence.

The author and journalist Mark Whitaker is our guest on StudioTulsa. A former managing editor of CNN Worldwide, and a previous Washington bureau chief for NBC News, Whitaker has a new book out, which he tells us about. It's an "expansive, prodigiously researched, and masterfully told history" (Kirkus Reviews) called "Smoketown: The Untold Story of the Other Great Black Renaissance." As was noted in an appreciation of this book in USA Today: "Pittsburgh was one of the country's citadels of black aspiration in music, sports, business, and culture.

How will this state's very serious budget problems get solved? And when? What, in the end, is it going to take? On this edition of StudioTulsa, we learn about Step Up Oklahoma, which is, per its website, a "nonpartisan group of business, civic, and community leaders [who have come] together to work with lawmakers to...stabilize state revenue, reform government to increase efficiency and cut abuse, and raise teacher pay by $5,000 a year." Our guest is OKC businessman and attorney, Glenn Coffee, who is a vocal member of the Step Up Oklahoma outfit.

For a number of different (and often unsettling) reasons, issues of race and racism have by now come into focus in American life in a pervasive manner that we, as a society, have not seen in decades. Or maybe, actually, we as a nation have never been as racially aware -- or alert -- as we are at this moment.

Our guest on this edition of ST is Sophia Pappas, who formerly led the pioneering initiative to bring "universal pre-K" to the New York City Public Schools. Pappas now resides in Tulsa, as she was recently hired by the Tulsa-based George Kaiser Family Foundation, the nonprofit social-justice and civic-enhancement organization funded by local billionaire and philanthropist George Kaiser. Pappas will now be in charge of introducing and implementing the GKFF's Birth through Eight Strategy, which was ten years in the making (and planning).

On this edition of ST, we get an update on the Kravis Discovery Center at the Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa. Located in the museum’s lower level, the Center recently underwent an extensive renovation in order to create a more interactive, more tech-driven -- and thus more "21st century" -- experience. Our guest is Dr. Bob Pickering, a Professor of Anthropology here at TU as well as a Senior Curator at Gilcrease.

Since 2012, the national non-profit organization Girls Who Code has taught computing and computer-programming skills to thousands of girls all across America. Our guest is the CEO and founder of that organization, Reshma Saujani, who has a new book out.

(Note: This program originally aired in April.) On this edition of ST, we speak with Daniel Connolly, a reporter who has, for more than a decade, covered Mexican immigration into the Southern U.S. for The Associated Press in Little Rock, The (Memphis) Commercial Appeal, and other outlets.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Daniel Connolly, a reporter who has, for more than a decade, covered Mexican immigration into the Southern U.S. for The Associated Press in Little Rock, The (Memphis) Commercial Appeal, and other outlets.

On this edition of our program, we listen back to wonderful discussion about raising kids from last summer. At that time, we spoke with Dr. Ross W. Greene, an author, speaker, and child psychologist who was on the faculty at Harvard Medical School for over twenty years. He told us about his then-new book, "Raising Human Beings: Creating a Collaborative Partnership with Your Child." You can learn more about this book, and can hear a free, on-demand audio-stream of our chat with Dr.

On this edition of ST, we're talking about the nonprofit collective known as ImpactTulsa, which began in 2014, and which (per its website) aims to "improve education for every child. Our partnership includes [several dozens of] leaders from education, business, philanthropic, nonprofit, civic, and faith communities who all believe education is the key to the prosperity of our community." Our guest is Kathy Seibold, the executive director of ImpactTulsa, who tells us about her organzation's recently released Community Impact Report for 2016.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Kim Johnson, who became chief executive officer of the Tulsa City-County Library on January 1st. After more than 15 years as an employee of the TCCL, Johnson seems like a perfect fit for this leadership post. She's very committed, of course, to books and learning and literacy -- and to the vital purpose of libraries within society today -- and she's the first African American to lead the 24-branch system that is the TCCL.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we listen back to a discussion that originally aired in February of last year. At that time, we spoke with Julia Clifford, the director of a documentary film called "Children of the Civil Rights." This film tells the little-known yet true story of a group of schoolchildren in Oklahoma City who -- for nearly six years -- staged Civil Rights-era sit-ins at various diners and lunch counters in OKC. These protests began in 1958, more than a year before the far more familiar Greensboro, North Carolina, sit-ins occurred.

On this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, we welcome Dr. Lisa Miller, an author and psychologist whose latest book, a bestseller called "The Spiritual Child," is now out in paperback. Dr. Miller -- who wrote an article for Time.com last year based on this book entitled "Why Kids Who Believe in Something Are Happier and Healthier" -- is the Director of Clinical Psychology at Columbia University's Teachers College, and she joins us by phone.

(Note: This interview first aired in early June.) "Eighty percent of success is showing up." Or so goes the old saying. But what do we really mean by this? And how does "showing up" in life -- or, if you prefer, routinely exhibiting "perseverance" -- relate to things like intellect, talent, drive, discipline, and so on? On this installment of ST, our guest is Dr. Angela Duckworth, a 2013 MacArthur Fellow and professor of psychology at the University of Pennsylvania who has advised the White House, the World Bank, and both NBA and NFL teams.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in May.) We speak with Susan Cain, who ignited a national conversation a few years ago with her widely celebrated nonfiction book, "Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking." That book challenged how we see introverts -- and how introverts see themselves -- and was mainly focused on the workplace. But now, as we learn on today's ST, Cain is back with a new book, which is aimed at kids and their experiences in the classroom.

"Eighty percent of success is showing up." Or so goes the old saying. But what do we really mean by this? And how does "showing up" in life -- or, if you prefer, exhibiting "perseverance" -- relate to things like intellect, talent, tenacity, drive, discipline, and so on? On this installment of ST, our guest is Dr. Angela Duckworth, a 2013 MacArthur Fellow and professor of psychology at the University of Pennsylvania who has advised the White House, the World Bank, and both NBA and NFL teams.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Dr. Lawrence Aber, the Willner Family Professor of Psychology and Public Policy at the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development at New York University, where he is also a University Professor. Dr. Aber is an internationally respected expert on child development, poverty, psychology, and how all of these relate to social policy.

We speak with Susan Cain, who ignited a national conversation a few years ago with her widely celebrated nonfiction book, "Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking." This book challenged how we see introverts -- and how introverts see themselves -- and was mainly focused on the workplace. But now, as we learn on today's ST, Cain is back with a new book, which is aimed at kids and their experiences in the classroom.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we learn about a "Diplomacy Begins Here" summit happening today, Thursday the 31st, at the Gilcrease Museum. This event is presented by Tulsa Global Alliance and Global Ties Arkansas in partnership with The University of Tulsa, Global Ties U.S., and the U.S. Department of State. Our guest is Jennifer Clinton, president of Global Ties U.S., which was formerly known as the National Council for International Visitors.

You might call it "adding insult to injury," as the old saying goes. Yesterday's announcement that the State of Oklahoma has authorized an additional 4% cut to state expenditures will hurt all agencies statewide, but perhaps especially school districts, since their school year is now almost 3/4 complete. This cut comes at a time of extreme uncertainty for public school leadership all across Oklahoma regarding the shape of next year's appropriation, given the $1.3 billion shortfall in the state budget.

Credit Matt Trotter / KWGS

On this edition of ST, we speak with two outstanding local citizens who were among the ten women recently given the Women of the Year - Pinnacle Award from the YWCA Tulsa collaboration with the Mayor'’s Commission on the Status of Women. Earlier this week, Tulsa Mayor Dewey Bartlett presented these awards in person, and in doing so recognized how each of this year's recipients has worked to eliminate racism and/or empower women.

As noted at Wikipedia: "Public diplomacy...broadly speaking, is the communication with foreign publics to establish a dialogue designed to inform and influence. There is no one definition of public diplomacy, and...definitions vary and continue to change over time. It is practiced through a variety of instruments and methods, ranging from personal contact and media interviews to the Internet and educational exchanges." On this installment of ST, we explore this hard-to-pin-down idea with a scholarly expert on such. Our guest is Dr.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak by phone with the novelist and writing instructor Eileen Pollack, whose books include the novels "Breaking and Entering" and "Paradise, New York," as well as two collections of short fiction and two creative-nonfiction textbooks. Her newest book is a memoir called "The Only Woman in the Room: Why Science Is Still a Boys' Club," and it looks back on her challenging experiences as a young woman majoring in physics at Yale in the 1970s while also highlighting various issues that still plague women in science across the nation today.

In the 1960s, during the tenure of LBJ, a so-called "war on poverty" was decalred in the U.S. Could or should such a "war" be waged again, and if so, how would it fare? On this edition of StudioTulsa, and interesting discussion in that regard with David Grusky, who is the Barbara Kimball Browning Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences at Stanford University. He's also the director of the Center on Poverty and Inequality at Stanford, and he co-edits Pathways Magazine as well as Stanford's Studies in Social Inequality Book Series.

On this edition of ST on Health, an interesting discussion with Dr. Dana Suskind, a Professor of Surgery at the University of Chicago who's also the Director of that school's Pediatric Cochlear Implant Program. She's probably best known as the founder and director of the Thirty Million Words Initiative.

On this edition of ST, we learn about the nonprofit program known as Sistema Tulsa. Per its website, Sistema Tulsa "envisions how a comprehensive and inclusive music program can positively impact the social, cognitive, and aesthetic realms of youth development. Supported by partnerships with the Boston Avenue United Methodist Church and the Tulsa Public Schools, Sistema Tulsa plans to provide a model for accessible, ensemble-based music programs that enrich the lives of local youth across varied underserved communities.

On this edition of our show, a conversation with the prolific and bestselling author Sharon Draper, who's the winner of this year's Anne V. Zarrow Award for Young Readers' Literature. This prize is awarded each year by the Tulsa Library Trust, and Ms. Draper will formally accept the honor at a presentation and address on Friday the 28th at 7pm. This event happens at the Hardesty Regional Library here in Tulsa, and Ms. Draper will also speak about her life and works, answer questions from the audience, and sign copies of her books.

On this edition of ST, we learn about the "summer slide." This phrase is what educational researchers use to refer to the approximately two months of grade-level learning that school kids lose without summertime academic enrichment. Our guests are Kathy Taylor, the CEO of ImpactTulsa and a former Mayor of Tulsa, and Anthony Grant, a recent Teach for America alum who is based in Tulsa (and who will soon be the Vice-Principal at Anderson Elementary School); both are working to combat "summer slide" amid Tulsa-area schoolchildren.

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