American Culture

On this edition of ST, we speak with the Kentucky-based writer and historian, Emily Bingham, who is the author of "Mordecai: An Early American Family" (2003) and co-editor of "The Southern Agrarians and the New Deal." Bingham tells us about her newest book, which is actually a biography of her own great-aunt: "Irrepressible: The Jazz Age Life of Henrietta Bingham." As was noted of this volume in a starred review in Kirkus: "A colorful portrait of a daring woman....

One day in 1903, in the sandy, seaside Outer Banks of North Carolina, two unknown brothers from Ohio changed the direction of history. But it would take the world some time catch up with -- to both understand and appreciate -- what had happened that day. The age of flight had arrived, but its origin had been decidedly quiet, obscure, remote. And who exactly were Wilbur and Orville Wright, anyway? Our guest on ST is the distinguished American historian and biographer -- and two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize -- David McCullough, who joins us to talk about his newest book.

On this installment of our show, a conversation with the distinguished historian and scholar, Robert Middlekauff, who is the Preston Hotchkis Professor of American History, Emeritus, at the University of California, Berkeley. Middlekauff -- whose earlier books include "The Mathers: Three Generations of Puritan Intellectuals, 1596–1728," which won the Bancroft Prize, and "The Glorious Cause: The American Revolution, 1763–1789," which was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize -- joins us to talk about his latest book, "Washington's Revolution: The Making of America's First Leader" (Knopf).

The John Hope Franklin Center for Reconciliation here in Tulsa will present its 2015 Symposium on Reconciliation next week, from May 26th through the 29th, and the theme for this year's gathering is "The Media and Reconciliation." Our guest on StudioTulsa will give an address at this symposium; Isabel Wilkerson -- who won a Pulitzer Prize for her work as Chicago Bureau Chief of The New York Times, and whose bestselling nonfiction account, "The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration," won the 2010 National Book Critics Circle Award for Nonfiction, the 2011 Heartlan

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we chat with the well-regarded Atlanta-based author, Jim Grimsley, who is best known for his novels "Winter Birds," "Dream Boy," and "My Drowning." Grimsley has a new memoir out, "How I Shed My Skin: Unlearning the Racist Lessons of a Southern Childhood," which he tells us about. In this book, which looks back on his rural 1960s North Carolina childhood, he writes: "White people declared that the South would rise again. Black people raised one fist and chanted for black power.

On this edition of ST, we're discussing an interesting new biography, "Jonas Salk: A Life." Our guest is Dr. Charlotte DeCroes Jacobs, the Shenson Professor of Medicine (Emerita) at Stanford University. Dr. Jacobs -- who's also the author of "Henry Kaplan and the Story of Hodgkin's Disease" -- remembers firsthand the polio scare of the middle 20th century, and thus also remembers Salk's widespread celebrity in this country; her heroic portrait of Salk was hailed as a "treasure trove of facts and stories" by Library Journal.

On this edition of ST, we offer an interesting interview with John M. Kinder, an assistant professor of American studies and history at Oklahoma State University.

On this edition of ST, we listen back to an interview that was recorded about a year ago with Blake Bailey, who grew up in Oklahoma City, now teaches creative writing in Virginia, and is the author of three highly regarded literary biographies (of Richard Yates, John Cheever, and Charles Jackson). Bailey has now, in his newest book, turned his attention to his own roots -- and specifically to his late brother, Scott, whose too-brief life was marked by incessant tragedy, addiction, recklessness, and mental instability.

It's been observed by many that disparity between the rich and the poor in the U.S. is now approaching levels not seen since the Great Depression. But how did we get here? On this edition of ST, a we offer a chat with Dean Baker, co-director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research.

On this edition of AT, an interesting and far-reaching chat with Dan and Cheryl Foliart -- a husband-and-wife team who are, respectively, a Hollywood composer and a music executive, and who are both currently visiting TU as J. Donald Feagin Guest Artists.

Our guest is the film historian and journalist Mark Harris, who's written for Entertainment Weekly, Grantland, New York Magazine, The New York Times, The Washington Post, and other publications.

Our guest today on StudioTulsa is D.T. Max, a staff writer at The New Yorker magazine who's also the author of "Every Love Story is a Ghost Story: A Life of David Foster Wallace," a highly regarded literary biography which first appeared a few years ago.

On this edition of ST, we speak with the writer J.C. Hallman, who was raised in Southern California, studied at the University of Pittsburgh and the Iowa Writers' Workshop, and now teaches at Oklahoma State University.

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with Joseph Malham, a Chicago-based writer and iconographer, who will soon appear here in Tulsa at the Gilcrease Museum. Malham is the author of "John Ford: Poet in the Desert," and he'll speak about the life and work of the legendary filmmaker Ford (1894-1973) tomorrow, Friday the 6th, at noon at the museum.

On this penultimate day of Black History Month, we're talking about the life and work of one of our greatest African American writers, Langston Hughes (1902-1967), the prolific and influential poet, activist, novelist, memoirist, playwright, and newspaper columnist. Our guest on ST is David Roessel, one of the editors of the recently published "Selected Letters of Langston Hughes" (Knopf).

(Note: This show originally aired in November.) Our guest is Betty Medsger, an author and former journalist whose latest book, "The Burglary: The Discovery of J. Edgar Hoover's Secret FBI," is now out in paperback. As a critic for The Wall Street Journal has noted, this is "an important work, the definitive treatment of an unprecedented and largely forgotten 'act of resistance' that revealed shocking official criminality in postwar America. One need not endorse break-ins as a form of protest to welcome this deeply researched account of the burglary at Media, Penn. Ms.

(Note: This show originally aired in October of last year.) On this installment of ST, an interesting chat with Laura Auricchio, a specialist in eighteenth-century French history and art who's received fellowships from the Fulbright Foundation, the Whiting Foundation, and Columbia University -- and who's also Dean of the School of Undergraduate Studies at The New School in NYC. Auricchio speaks about her new book, "The Marquis: Lafayette Reconsidered," which was called "a sharp and moving biography" in a starred review in Kirkus.

(Please note: This program originally aired in September of last year.) On this edition of ST, an in-depth discussion with David Rose, an award-winning entrepreneur and instructor at the MIT Media Lab who specializes in how digital information interfaces with the physical environment. Rose also founded Ambient Devices, which pioneered the technology used to embed Internet information in everyday objects like lamps, mirrors, and umbrellas.

On today's ST, we are pleased to once again welcome Catherine Whitney, the Chief Curator and Curator of American Art at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa, who tells us about a fantastic new show on view at that museum called "New York to New Mexico: Masterworks of American Modernism from the Vilcek Foundation Collection." This show will run through May 3rd; more info can be accessed at the museum's website.

On Sunday the 25th -- at Grace Lutheran Church (2331 East 5th Place) in Tulsa -- the 28th Annual Knippa Interfaith / Ecumenical Lecture will be given. It is free to the public, it starts at 7pm, and it will feature the Rev. Dr. John M. Buchanan, Pastor Emeritus of the Fourth Presbyterian Church of Chicago (where he served for more than 25 years). Buchanan is also the editor and publisher of The Christian Century magazine; he has received numerous doctorates and honors for his scholarship, and he's written three books.

On this edition of ST, we welcome James Warhola (born 1955), an American artist and illustrator who's created more than two dozen children's picture books over the years. Warhola briefly worked at Interview magazine in New York City -- which was established and edited by Andy Warhol, his uncle -- before becoming a science fiction illustrator. As such, beginning in the early 1980s, he did the cover art for hundreds of sci-fi books, and he was later an artist and illustrator for Mad magazine.

From now through February 26th, the nonprofit Living Arts of Tulsa (in the downtown Brady Arts District) will present "Speaking Volumes: Transforming Hate," a striking and wide-ranging exhibition collecting work by sixty different artists that first went on view in Helena, Montana, in 2008.

(Photo: Craig Smith / Heard Museum)

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with James Pepper Henry, director of the well-regarded Heard Museum in Phoenix, Arizona, who's just been named at the new director of the Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa. Pepper Henry will begin his tenure at Gilcrease in late March. He's a member of Oklahoma's Kaw Nation, and in a statement released on Monday the 5th, he referred to his upcoming arrival at Gilcrease as "a real homecoming.... I have lots of family and friends in Oklahoma. The museum's founder, Thomas Gilcrease, and I share Muscogee Creek heritage.

(Note: This program originally aired in December of 2013.) On this edition of ST, we tap into the unmistakable holiday cheer that's currently wafting through our offices like so much thick fog in a John Durkee crack-of-dawn weather report. In other words, we sit down with a few of our co-workers here at Public Radio Tulsa to chat about which Christmas songs matter most to them and why. Please note, however, that due to certain music-rebroadcast-rights-related issues, we are not able to offer an online "stream" of this particular show.

From "American Sniper," "Into the Woods," and "The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies" to "Wild," "The Imitation Game" (shown here), and "Boyhood," we're dishing on this installment of StudioTulsa about several of the notable movies that arrived (or else will soon arrive) in theaters in 2014. Our guest is Michael Smith, film critic at The Tulsa World.

Alfred Hitchcock's longtime collaborator, Alexander Graham Bell's assistant, Vladimir Nabokov's wife, Muhammad Ali's first coach, Ernest Shackleton's right-hand man, John Wayne's stunt man, and the little-known sixth member of The Rolling Stones -- on this installment of ST, we're talking about some of the great "sidekicks" of modern history. Our guest is Julia Rothman, one of the editors of a new book called "The Who, the What, and the When: 65 Artists Illustrate the Secret Sidekicks of History," which is just out from Chronicle Books.

Our guest on ST is Dr. George Glass, a longtime Texas-based physician who's also the co-author of "The Overparenting Epidemic: Why Helicopter Parenting Is Bad for Your Kids...and Dangerous for You, Too!" While the notion of "overparenting" or "helicopter parenting" is not really a new concept, what is rather newly and widely apparent is that our society's first generation of overparented children are now becoming adults in their own right.

On this presentation of ST, we speak with Marja Mills, a former reporter and feature writer with The Chicago Tribune. Mills is also the author of a bestselling memoir, "The Mockingbird Next Door," which details the time she spent getting to know novelist Harper Lee -- the author, of course, of the immortal "To Kill a Mockingbird" -- as well as Lee's older sister, Alice. Mills will discuss this recently published book (its origins, its development, its major findings, and so on) tonight, Monday the 8th, at 6:30pm at a Book Smart Tulsa event at the Circle Cinema.

On this installment of ST, we speak with the winner of the 2014 Peggy V. Helmerich Distinguished Author Award, which is annually given by the Tulsa Library Trust. (Past recipients of this honor include Michael Chabon, John Updike, and Geraldine Brooks.) Ann Patchett is our guest today; she is a bestselling American novelist and essayist who's written six novels (among them "The Magician's Assistant," "Bel Canto," "Run," and "State of Wonder") and three books of nonfiction (including the recent "This Is the Story of a Happy Marriage").

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we listen back to an interview that we first aired earlier this year with the author, essayist, and cultural critic Chuck Klosterman. At that time, we chatted with Klosterman about his essay collection, "I Wear the Black Hat: Grappling with Villains (Real and Imagined)," which is an often funny and highly entertaining exploration of why we as a society are so attracted to -- yet also, of course, repelled by -- villains both fictional and nonfictional.

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