American Culture

On this edition of ST, we welcome Amy Wells, a Hollywood-based set decorator who's worked on several outstanding films and TV series over the years, among them the television programs "House," "Love Field," and "Mad Men," as well as the motion pictures "Clueless," "There Will Be Blood," and "A Single Man." Wells will speak this evening (Thursday the 17th) at 7pm at the Philbrook Museum of Art; her appearance is a part of the museum's ongoing "Third Thursday" series.

On today's show, which originally aired earlier this year, we offer a conversation with Katherine Newman, Dean of the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences and Professor of Sociology at Johns Hopkins University, who's written several books on middle-class economic instability, urban poverty, and the sociology of inequality.

"Homesick and Happy"

May 1, 2012

On today's edition of StudioTulsa, an informed discussion in praise of summer camp. Our guest is Michael Thompson, PhD, a consulting school psychologist and author who's widely known for his bestselling study of contemporary American boys and their emotions, "Raising Cain." Thompson's new book, just out as a Ballantine Trade Paperback Original, is "Homesick and Happy: How Time Away from Parents Can Help a Child Grow." In this work, he offers an engaging and well-researched consideration of both the traditions and advantages of summer camp.

On today's show, we speak with the writer and new-media strategist Mathew Gross, who (along with Mel Gilles) is one of the two authors of a thought-provoking and quite timely non-fiction book called "The Last Myth: What the Rise of Apocalyptic Thinking Tells Us About America." It's an engaging historical study that mainly explores two separate yet related queries: "Why are contemporary Americans so obsessed with the end of the world?" and "What does this obsession actually say about us, as a people?" Did you know, for example, that nearly 60 percent of Americans believe that the events fore

On today's program, we offer a linguistic/semantic discussion of technology and culture --- what these two terms mean, what they've meant, what they mean in America as opposed to Europe, and where the ideas behind these terms overlap.

On today's StudioTulsa, which is a re-broadcast of a program that first aired back in January, we speak with Clay Johnson about his interesting new book, "The Information Diet: A Case for Conscious Consumption." Everyone knows that many of us --- perhaps most of us --- seem obsessed with information these days. We incessantly check our favorite websites, texts, instant messages, emails, downloads, videos, status updates, tweets, etc.

A century ago, women could not own property or vote. Today, women are the primary wage earners in about 40% of American households, and are poised to be a majority within twenty years if current trends continue. Washington Post staff writer Liza Mundy calls it "The Big Flip" and examines this huge cultural shift and its impact on gender roles, relationships, and social dynamics.

On today's show, we meet Bill Courtney, volunteer football coach of the impoverished North Memphis Manassas High School Tigers, and subject of the 2012 Oscar-winning documentary, "Undefeated." Filmmakers Dan Lindsay and T. J. Martin followed the coach and team through the 2009 season which found them on the verge of winning their first high school playoff game ever.

On today's program, which revisits an interview that we originally aired in September of last year, we hear from the veteran author, critic, and scholar Andrew Delbanco, who is the Chair of American Studies at Columbia University as well as a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and The New Republic.

On today's show, which originally aired late last year, we speak with Keith Recker, the co-author of an interesting and visually striking new book called "Pantone: The Twentieth Century in Color." Pantone, LLC, is known and referred to worldwide for its color systems, which are routinely used in digital and print publishing, fashion, plastics, architecture, interiors, paints, and so on. Indeed, Pantone's colors are seen as the universal language for accurate color communication --- and in this book, we're presented with the cultural history of 20th-century America in terms of these colors.