American Art

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we're talking about an engaging and multi-faceted little art exhibit on view at TU's Zarrow Center for Art and Education (at 124 East Brady Street, in downtown Tulsa) through June 28th. "The Art of the Book" offers more than 20 works that both explore and encapsulate the book as an art form -- from hand-crafted miniature volumes to book-inspired sculptures to re-purposed "altered book" creations.

On this installment of ST, we learn about "Red," an award-winning play about the Abstract Expressionist artist Mark Rothko that will soon be presented at the Williams Theater in the Tulsa PAC by the locally-based American Theatre Company. Our guest is Lisa Wilson, who is directing this production.

On this installment of ST, we learn about a gorgeous new show at the Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa; "California Impressionism: Selections from The Irvine Museum" opens on Sunday (the 3rd) and runs through September 6th. Our guest is the curator for this traveling exhibition, Jean Stern, who is the founding executive director of The Irvine Museum (in Irvine, CA).

On this installment of ST, we speak with Holcombe Waller, an award-winning musician and performance artist who is based in Portland, Oregon, and who will present a multimedia production entitled "Surfacing" tonight (Friday the 6th) and tomorrow night (Saturday the 7th) at the Liddy Doenges Theatre in the Tulsa PAC. Both shows begin at 8pm, and both are offered as part of the now-underway New Genre Festival XXII-A from Living Arts of Tulsa.

The 108 Contemporary gallery in the Brady Arts District in downtown Tulsa opened a new exhibit this past weekend that focuses on the growth and development of fiber art in America from roughly the 1950s onward. The show -- called "Innovators and Legends" -- runs through March 22nd. Our guest on ST is the curator for this exhibit, Geary Jones, who is himself a well-regarded fiber artist.

On today's ST, we are pleased to once again welcome Catherine Whitney, the Chief Curator and Curator of American Art at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa, who tells us about a fantastic new show on view at that museum called "New York to New Mexico: Masterworks of American Modernism from the Vilcek Foundation Collection." This show will run through May 3rd; more info can be accessed at the museum's website.

On this edition of ST, we welcome back Karen York, Director of Collections and Exhibitions at the Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art here in Tulsa. York tells us about two interesting exhibits at the museum that will close this coming weekend; the last day to view each show is Sunday the 1st.

On this edition of ST, we welcome James Warhola (born 1955), an American artist and illustrator who's created more than two dozen children's picture books over the years. Warhola briefly worked at Interview magazine in New York City -- which was established and edited by Andy Warhol, his uncle -- before becoming a science fiction illustrator. As such, beginning in the early 1980s, he did the cover art for hundreds of sci-fi books, and he was later an artist and illustrator for Mad magazine.

From now through February 26th, the nonprofit Living Arts of Tulsa (in the downtown Brady Arts District) will present "Speaking Volumes: Transforming Hate," a striking and wide-ranging exhibition collecting work by sixty different artists that first went on view in Helena, Montana, in 2008.

(Photo: Craig Smith / Heard Museum)

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with James Pepper Henry, director of the well-regarded Heard Museum in Phoenix, Arizona, who's just been named at the new director of the Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa. Pepper Henry will begin his tenure at Gilcrease in late March. He's a member of Oklahoma's Kaw Nation, and in a statement released on Monday the 5th, he referred to his upcoming arrival at Gilcrease as "a real homecoming.... I have lots of family and friends in Oklahoma. The museum's founder, Thomas Gilcrease, and I share Muscogee Creek heritage.

Alfred Hitchcock's longtime collaborator, Alexander Graham Bell's assistant, Vladimir Nabokov's wife, Muhammad Ali's first coach, Ernest Shackleton's right-hand man, John Wayne's stunt man, and the little-known sixth member of The Rolling Stones -- on this installment of ST, we're talking about some of the great "sidekicks" of modern history. Our guest is Julia Rothman, one of the editors of a new book called "The Who, the What, and the When: 65 Artists Illustrate the Secret Sidekicks of History," which is just out from Chronicle Books.

On this edition of our program, we are talking about the fascinating and far-reaching work of Dennis Oppenheim (1938-2011), the American conceptual artist, performance artist, earth artist, sculptor, photographer, and filmmaker. TU's School of Art will soon present a double-venued exhibition entitled "Dennis Oppenheim: Architecture/Not Architecture, Landscape/Not Landscape," which will be on view at the Alexandre Hogue Gallery (on the TU campus) as well as the Zarrow Center for Art and Education (in downtown Tulsa's Brady Arts District).

From just after WWII until the late 1970s, the Indian Annual exhibition at Tulsa's Philbrook Museum of Art served as a vital outlet -- and a nationally recognized showcase -- for Native American fine art. This juried competition and sale attracted artists, collectors, and curators from across the country for more than three decades. It also helped build the collections of institutions like Philbrook, the Heard Museum (AZ), and the Museum of the American Indian (NY), all of which consistently purchased award-winning pieces at this show.

On this edition of our show, we learn about "Mother Road," which is "an exploration of Route 66 by artist Jessica Harvey" that will be on view at the AHHA space (in the Brady Arts District in downtown Tulsa) through November 23rd. Harvey, who's originally from Chicago, has exhibited throughout the United States, and is currently in residence at the AHHA Creative Studios, is our guest on ST today.

The lasting and widespread influence that choreographer Martha Graham (1894-1991) had on the world of dance has been likened to the impact that Pablo Picasso had on painting, or that Aaron Copland had on music, or that Frank Lloyd Wright had on architecture. In other words, it's an influence that clearly continues to this day; Graham is commonly seen as a visionary who all but created what we now call modern dance, and who shaped the ideas and careers of countless dancers who came after her.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we present a delightful chat with Rosalind Cook, the locally based sculptor whose well-liked works can be seen throughout the Tulsa community (with more than 30 of her sculptures on public display). Cook's fine, sensitively rendered, and decidedly humane pieces celebrate the human as well as the divine, the earthbound or natural as well as the spiritual or devotional. And as the artist herself has noted, at her website: "I specialize in figurative bronze sculptures that are representational in style.

On today's show, we're discussing an interesting new exhibition that recently opened at the 108 Contemporary Gallery in Tulsa's Brady Arts District: "Twists and Turns" will be on display through October 26th. It's a craft exhibit of tapestries and ceramics that pairs -- for the first time ever -- two Israeli artists, Aleksandra Stoyanov and Zemer Peled, and it's actually the first "stop" in what will be a national tour for this show.

On this edition of ST, we speak with artist Ken Kewley, who teaches at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts and has shown his work at many galleries, museums, and schools nationwide. "Ken Kewley: Collages, Drawings, and Paintings" is a new show that will be on display at the Alexandre Hogue Gallery (in Phillips Hall on the TU campus) from today, Thursday the 4th, through the 25th of this month. Indeed, there will be an opening reception for this show today -- from 5pm to 7pm -- at the Hogue Gallery. This reception will begin with an Artist's Talk and is free to the public.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Steve Liggett, artistic director of the nonprofit Living Arts of Tulsa (located downtown at 307 East Brady). Liggett is also the curator of "Chandelier & Other Luminous Objects," which opened in early August and will remain on exhibit at the Living Arts gallery through September 25th -- and which Liggett tells us all about on today's program.

The "Rediscover Gilcrease" weekend -- a two-day, free-to-the-public gala happening at the museum on September 6th and 7th -- will feature unique attractions, special activities, and lots of family-friendly entertainment. Among the highlights, without question, will be the official opening of the striking new Helmerich Center for American Research at Gilcrease. Several different lectures and presentations will be presented at the Helmerich Center, and one of them will be given by our guest today. Our guest is Brian Hosmer, the H.G.

On this edition of our show, we welcome back Catherine Whitney, the Chief Curator and Curator of American Art at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa, who tells us all about a small but impressive photography show currently on view at the museum. "Hard Times, Oklahoma, 1939-40: The Documentary Photography of Russell Lee" will run through October 26th. Beginning in 1936, Lee worked alongside Walker Evans, Dorothea Lange, and others as part of the government-sponsored Farm Security Administration, which was a New Deal program created by FDR.

On this installment of ST, we preview a new exhibition that will soon open at the Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa; "Alexandre Hogue: An American Visionary -- Paintings and Works on Paper" will be on view at Gilcrease from August 24th through November 30th. Mainly known for his "Dust Bowl" or "Erosion Series" of Depression-era paintings, Alexandre Hogue (1898-1994) was one of the more celebrated artists to come to prominence during the Regionalist movement in American art (which also saw the rise of such masters as Thomas Hart Benton and Grant Wood).

(Note: This program originally aired earlier this year.) On this edition of our show, we offer an interesting chat with Peter Korn, the founder and executive director of the Center for Furniture Craftsmanship, a non-profit school in Rockport, Maine. A furniture-maker since 1974, Korn is also the author of several noted how-to books, yet his latest volume is, so to speak, more of a "why" book. It's a readable and far-reaching memoir called "Why We Make Things and Why It Matters: The Education of a Craftsman" --- and he discusses it with us today.

Our guest on ST today is William Joyce, the well-known children's book author and illustrator, veteran New Yorker magazine cover artist, and all-around creative guru. Joyce's many picture books include "George Shrinks," "Dinosaur Bob," and "Santa Calls" --- and he won three Emmy Awards for his "Rolie Polie Olie" animated TV series.

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with the Oklahoma City-based artist and curator, Nathan Lee. Lee is the curator of "Noir," a newly opened group show at the Living Arts space in downtown Tulsa which includes work from a number of different African-American artists from throughout Oklahoma --- and which will be on exhibit through July 11th. As is noted of this show at the Living Arts of Tulsa website: "'Noir' is an examination of the shifting definition of Black culture.

On this edition of ST, we offer an interesting discussion with the mixed-media artist Naomi Wanjiku Gakunga, who studied art at the University of Nairobi in Kenya and then at UCLA and now lives and works in San Antonio, Texas. As is noted of this artist at her personal website: "[Gakunga's] works are predominantly wall-hanging sculptures created from tin cans, steel wire, and oxidized sheet metal forms.

On this edition of our show, we offer an interesting chat with Peter Korn, the founder and executive director of the Center for Furniture Craftsmanship, a non-profit school in Rockport, Maine. A furniture-maker since 1974, Korn is also the author of several noted how-to books, yet his latest volume is, so to speak, more of a "why" book. It's a readable and far-reaching memoir called "Why We Make Things and Why It Matters: The Education of a Craftsman" --- and he discusses it with us today.

Once upon a time, museums throughout this country would invariably display or organize their "art" and their "Native American art" in two distinct categories; a piece would "belong" to one or the other camp, but never both. That's increasingly not the case anymore, thankfully --- and our guest today talks about why. We're pleased to welcome Rick West back to ST; he'll be the keynote speaker for a day-long Native Art Symposium tomorrow (Saturday the 5th) at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa.

On this installment of ST, we're discussing a terrific new art exhibit at TU's Henry Zarrow Center for Art and Education, located at 124 East Brady in Tulsa's downtown Brady Arts District: "Painted Faces" will be on view through April 20th. This show explores the work of ten outstanding artists --- from Kansas City, Connecticut, Texas, the U.K., and elsewhere --- all of whom use the human head as a regular element in their picture-making.

On this edition of ST, we welcome Leticia Bajuyo, an Indiana-based artist whose vast, mixed-media, and digital-disc-driven installation/sculpture called "Dual Wielding" is now on view at the Living Arts Gallery in downtown Tulsa; this work is being exhibited in connection with Living Arts New Genre Festival XXI, which runs through Saturday the 8th. Tonight, Friday the 7th --- as part of the Brady Arts District's "First Friday Art Crawl" --- "Dual Wielding" will have its opening reception, which begins at 6pm.

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