African-American Life

(Note: This show originally aired in August of this year.) Our guest is author Ladee Hubbard, who joins us to discuss her first novel. It's called "The Talented Ribkins." It's a creative and widely acclaimed book about race, class, politics, and America itself...and it focus on, of all things, a family of super-heroes. And per a starred review of this novel by Kirkus: "Crafty and wistful.... Hubbard weaves this narrative with prodigious skill and compelling warmth. You anticipate a movie while wondering if any movie could do this fascinating family, well, justice.

Our guest on ST is Issa Kohler-Hausmann, who will tomorrow night (Thursday the 16th) deliver the 2017 Judge Stephanie K. Seymour Distinguished Lecture in Law here at TU.

There is a difference, of course, between a true leader and a person who's simply in charge -- but what, precisely, is that difference? On this edition of ST, our guest is Nancy Koehn, an historian who teaches at the Harvard Business School, where she holds the James E. Robison Chair of Business Administration.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Joseph Opala, an American historian who's known for his research on the so-called "Gullah Connection," i.e., the long historical thread linking the West African nation of Sierra Leone to the Gullah people of coastal South Carolina and Georgia. Opala, an Oklahoma native, first learned of the Gullah people while serving in the Peace Corps, just after college; by now, he has spent more than four decades making historical discoveries about these people, their language, their culture, their lineage, and so forth.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Herb Boyd, an award-winning journalist and historian who's also the author of several books on black history and activism, including biographies of James Baldwin and Sugar Ray Robinson; his latest book is a remarkable 300-year history of African-American life and politics in his hometown of Detroit. Boyd, who now teaches at the City College of New York, will be giving a free-to-the-public lecture tonight, the 12th, at 7pm here at TU.

On this edition of ST, we welcome the Tulsa-based author Jennifer Latham back to our show. Her recently published YA novel, "Dreamland Burning," is a suspenseful narrative about the Tulsa Race Riot. As was noted of this book in an appreciative review from School Library Journal: "Latham follows up 'Scarlett Undercover' with a rich work that links past and present in a tale that explores racial prejudice. After the remains of a skeleton are found in her Tulsa, OK, backyard, 17-year-old Rowan Chase becomes consumed with finding out the story behind the death.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we learn about a new exhibition (which opens this evening, the 4th) at the 108 Contemporary Gallery in downtown Tulsa. "Both Sides Now: Joyce J. Scott & Sonya Clark" will be on view through September 24th. Scott is our guest on the program today. And the exhibit in which she's co-featured is thus described at the 108 website: "Through the use of glass, beadwork, and fiber, 2016 MacArthur Fellow Joyce J.

On this edition of ST, a discussion with Richard Rothstein, who is a research associate of the Economic Policy Institute and a Fellow at the Thurgood Marshall Institute of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund. Widely seen as a leading authority on U.S.

What can American motion pictures tell us about the American South, and what can the South tell us about the movies? Our guest is Robert Jackson, an Associate Professor of English here at the University of Tulsa.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, an equally fascinating and entertaining discussion with the one-and-only Rebecca Ungerman, the influential and diversely-talented and fan-tabulous singer/songwriter/performer who's been wowing Tulsa audiences for 20+ years. She's bringing not one but two different shows to the Tulsa PAC's SummerStage series this month: "Cats of Any Color" will be staged on the 17th and 18th, and "Oy, Gestalt!" will be presented on the 24th and 25th.

KWGS News File Photo

Last night, a jury here in Tulsa acquitted one Betty Shelby -- a white Tulsa Police officer -- who had been charged with first-degree manslaughter after she shot and killed an unarmed black man named Terence Crutcher last September. Some people in this community feel that justice has been served, while others feel, as was stated by Rev. Joey Crutcher, the victim's father, after the verdict came down: "I believe in my heart that Betty Shelby got away with murder." Where does Tulsa go from here?

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we're discussing the Oscar-nominated documentary feature, "I Am Not Your Negro," which opens locally tomorrow (Friday the 24th) at the Circle Cinema. Indeed, our two guests today -- Hannibal Johnson (a Tulsa-based author and attorney) and Bob Jackson (an Associate Professor of English here at the University of Tulsa) -- will both be speaking about this film, and co-leading an audience-wide discussion about it, tomorrow night at the Circle.

Our guest is Edward Baptist, a professor at Cornell University, who will soon give the 2017 Cadenhead-Settle Memorial Lecture here at TU. (This free-to-the-public event happens on Monday the 6th, beginning at 7pm; you'll find more information here.) Prof.

On this edition of ST, we learn about several special, free-to-the-public events scheduled for this coming weekend in connection with MLK Day. Events are planned for both Sunday the 15th and Monday the 16th in downtown Tulsa (with the 16th, of course, being the actual Martin Luther King Jr. Day holiday). On the 15th, there will be a Walk of Peace and Solidarity as well as an Interfaith Commemorative Service. On the 16th, a Founders Breakfast will precede the 2017 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we listen back to a discussion that originally aired in February of last year. At that time, we spoke with Julia Clifford, the director of a documentary film called "Children of the Civil Rights." This film tells the little-known yet true story of a group of schoolchildren in Oklahoma City who -- for nearly six years -- staged Civil Rights-era sit-ins at various diners and lunch counters in OKC. These protests began in 1958, more than a year before the far more familiar Greensboro, North Carolina, sit-ins occurred.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Jeff Olivet, who is the President and CEO of the Boston-based Center for Social Innovation. Olivet is also a nationally recognized expert on homelessness, poverty, affordable housing, behavioral health, public health, and HIV -- and he'll be speaking about "Racism and Homelessness in America" at this year's National Zarrow Mental Health Symposium, which happens here in Tulsa from today (the 28th) through Friday (the 30th) at the Cox Business Center downtown.

How have civil rights changed in this country -- and indeed, around the world -- since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001? How has our understanding of civil rights -- our common impression of it -- changed in this regard, as well as our politics? We explore such questions with our guest on ST today, Sahar F. Aziz, who is a professor at the Texas A&M University School of Law and a nonresident fellow at the Brookings Doha Center. She'll deliver the 17th Annual Buck Colbert Franklin Memorial Civil Rights Lecture at the TU Law School on Thursday the 15th at 6pm.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Doug Henderson, an architectural photographer based here in Tulsa who has photographed, starting back in 2010, many different forts and castles along the coast of West Africa where, from the 1600s to the early 1800s, European traders imprisoned slaves until ships could carry them to the New World. Through these grim and rather under-documented structures, more than 12 million people passed in their shameful journey to slavery.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Alton Carter, an Oklahoma Book Award-winning author whose memoir, "The Boy Who Carried Bricks," was originally published in 2015. It's a painful-to-read yet ultimately uplifting autobiography that details Carter's growing up in smalltown Oklahoma. Carter will be participating in the upcoming "Chapters" event at the TCCL's Hardesty Regional Library, on September 8th at 6:30pm; this event is a fundraiser in support of adult literacy programs, and the deadline to register for it is September 1st.

On this installment of ST, we speak with author Norm Stamper, who was a police officer for more than 30 years, first in San Diego and then in Seattle, where he retired as that city's police chief. He is widely credited as the architect of the nation's first community policing program and served as a founding member of President Bill Clinton's National Advisory Council on the Violence Against Women Act.

On this edition of ST, a compelling discussion with Ari Berman, a political correspondent for The Nation whose writing has also appeared in The New York Times and Rolling Stone (and who is a frequent commentator on MSNBC and NPR). We are discussing Berman's widely acclaimed book, "Give Us the Ballot: The Modern Struggle for Voting Rights in America," which first appeared last summer and will be published in paperback early next month.

Questions of race and ethnicity are clearly at the heart of American politics -- and American culture, and American life -- in an all-encompassing way that we as a nation haven't seen since the Sixties. On this edition of ST, we speak with Dr. Shelly Tochluk, author of "Witnessing Whiteness: The Need to Talk About Race and How to Do It." It's a widely read book on contemporary US race relations, and one that Dr. Tochluk has spoken about -- and led workshops on -- here in Tulsa in the past.

On this edition of our show, we learn about a documentary film that will be screened tonight (Thursday the 11th) in Helmerich Hall on the TU campus. The screening is free to the public, and it will also feature a panel discussion; it begins at 7pm. The film is question is "Children of the Civil Rights," and our guest is Julia Clifford, who directed it. As noted of this film at the "Children of the Civil Rights" website: "No one knew a group of children in Oklahoma City were heroes; not even the children themselves.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Kristen T. Oertel, the Barnard Associate Professor of 19th Century American History here at TU.

On this presentation of ST, our guest by phone is Tavis Smiley, the renowned broadcaster, author, political commentator, publisher, and columnist. Tomorrow night, Thursday the 28th, Smiley will be given the Tulsa Library Trust's 2016 Sankofa Freedom Award during a free-to-the-public ceremony at the Rudisill Regional Library in North Tulsa. (The library is located at 1520 N.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in June; we are pleased to present it once again on MLK Day.) On this edition of ST, a discussion with the longtime Georgia-based journalist, Jim Auchmutey, who tells us about his book, "The Class of '65: A Student, a Divided Town and the Long Road to Forgiveness." It's a detailed profile of Americus High School, in rural southern Georgia, at a pivotal time in that school's -- and this country's -- history.

On this edition of ST, we chat with The Reverend Dr. William J. Barber II, who's the president of the North Carolina chapter of the NAACP. Rev.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we listen back to show that first aired in May. At that time, we spoke with the well-regarded Atlanta-based author, Jim Grimsley, who is best known for his novels "Winter Birds," "Dream Boy," and "My Drowning." We chatted with Grimsley about his latest book, a memoir called "How I Shed My Skin: Unlearning the Racist Lessons of a Southern Childhood." As was noted of this account of the author's rural 1960s North Carolina childhood, per a book critic for The Charlotte Observer: "Excellent....

On this edition of ST, a discussion with the longtime Georgia-based journalist, Jim Auchmutey, who tells us about his new book: "The Class of '65: A Student, a Divided Town, and the Long Road to Forgiveness." It's a detailed profile of Americus High School, in rural southern Georgia, at a pivotal time in that school's -- and this country's -- history. In particular, Auchmutey depicts the life and times of one Greg Wittkamper, a student at the school who came from a nearby Christian commune that devoutly and publicly (and often quite dangerously) supported racial equality.

The John Hope Franklin Center for Reconciliation here in Tulsa will present its 2015 Symposium on Reconciliation next week, from May 26th through the 29th, and the theme for this year's gathering is "The Media and Reconciliation." Our guest on StudioTulsa will give an address at this symposium; Isabel Wilkerson -- who won a Pulitzer Prize for her work as Chicago Bureau Chief of The New York Times, and whose bestselling nonfiction account, "The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration," won the 2010 National Book Critics Circle Award for Nonfiction, the 2011 Heartlan

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