Weekend Edition on 89.5-1

Saturdays & Sundays 7am to 10am
Scott Simon and Audie Cornish

This two-hour morning newsmagazine covers hard news, a wide variety of newsmakers, and cultural stories with care, accuracy, and a wink of humor.

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5182a86de1c80b78054d2fb9|5182a865e1c80b78054d2f8f

Pages

Around the Nation
5:28 am
Sat August 25, 2012

'D'oh!' Simpsons Stamps A Flop For Postal Service

Originally published on Sat August 25, 2012 9:16 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

There's only one way to begin this item.

(SOUNDBITE OF THEME FROM "THE SIMPSONS")

Read more
NPR Story
4:47 am
Sat August 25, 2012

Apple Win Over Samsung Sends Message To Industry

Originally published on Sat August 25, 2012 9:16 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Apple has won a decisive victory in a closely watched patent lawsuit. A federal jury in California yesterday ordered Samsung to pay Apple slightly more than $1 billion. The jury found that the world's largest maker of smartphones had essentially stolen iPhone and iPad technology. As NPR's Wendy Kaufman reports, the impact of the ruling is likely to be felt throughout the tech industry.

Read more
NPR Story
4:47 am
Sat August 25, 2012

Need A Soprano? Get A Gibbon On Helium

Originally published on Sat August 25, 2012 9:16 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This just in: Gibbons on helium sing like sopranos. Wired magazine reports on a study at Kyoto University in which an ape named Fuku-chan was placed in a chamber filled with helium enriched air. This was not a party trick. Helium-rich air apparently allows scientists to more easily analyze vocalizations. Fuku-chan's bellow went from this:

(SOUNDBITE OF BELLOWING)

SIMON: To this:

(SOUNDBITE OF BELLOWING)

Read more
NPR Story
4:47 am
Sat August 25, 2012

Hurricane Andrew: Florida's Unwelcome Visitor

Originally published on Sat August 25, 2012 9:16 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Read more
Music Interviews
1:03 am
Sat August 25, 2012

Sean Rowe: An Outdoorsman Enters Civilization

Sean Rowe's new album is The Salesman and the Shark.
Marius Bugge

Originally published on Sat August 25, 2012 9:16 am

Sean Rowe has a voice and a style that stands out in popular music. His voice is deep — really, truly deep — fine, and often doleful. He's a baritone troubadour who sings of roads not taken, regrets and the dreams that shake you awake at 3 in the morning.

After years of working bars, road houses and more bars, Rowe is playing concert stages and winning over critics for his story-songs and that remarkable voice. But, as he tells NPR's Scott Simon, he wasn't always so proud to be a singer.

Read more
Music Al Fresco
1:03 am
Sat August 25, 2012

A Roving Percussionist On The Big Easy's Busy Streets

Clyde Casey has been performing on the streets of New Orleans for 40 years.
Tegan Wendland

Originally published on Sat August 25, 2012 11:53 am

All summer long, Weekend Edition has been bringing listeners the sounds of music played outdoors by all manner of street performers. Of all the cities in America that embrace buskers, New Orleans, with its tradition of jazz and oompah bands at Mardi Gras, may be the most welcoming. It also happens to be a city with a certain eccentric flair — so Weekend Edition wasn't surprised to find Clyde Casey there.

Read more
Music Interviews
1:03 am
Sat August 25, 2012

Selah Sue: From Online Stardom To A Stage With Prince

Selah Sue performs at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C.
Coburn Dukehart NPR

Originally published on Sat August 25, 2012 10:18 am

Just a small-town girl, living in a lonely world — in Belgium, with her guitar and a MySpace page. That's how Selah Sue used to introduce her music to those outside her hometown: with short videos made between high-school classes and weekend shows at local clubs, posted to her online journal.

Read more
What's New?
9:56 am
Tue August 21, 2012

Climate Change and the American Southwest: The New Normal

Craig Allen, research ecologist with the U.S. Geological Survey, surveys the Dome Wilderness area of New Mexico's Cochiti Canyon. Once heavily forested, the area was devastated by the Las Conchas Fire in 2011.
David Gilkey NPR

This summer, huge wildfires burned across the U.S., especially in dry western states. Though there were fewer fires than usual, they were uncommonly large. Fire scientists say these "mega fires" are becoming the new normal, and climate change that dries out these regions is making the situation worse. They're not sure these fires can be stopped, and the forests of the American Southwest may soon be lost.

Read more
Europe
2:03 pm
Sat August 18, 2012

For Julian Assange, A Tricky Exit For Asylum

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This week, Ecuador announced that it would grant Julian Assange, the founder of WikiLeaks, political asylum. He's been holed up in Ecuador's London embassy since June facing extradition to Sweden over sexual assault claims that he denies. But somehow he's got to get from London to Ecuador and he can't just buy a ticket, buy a canister of tea in duty-free and fly to Quito. The British government says that Julian Assange will be arrested if he sets a foot out of the embassy door.

Read more
Business
8:43 am
Sat August 18, 2012

In Wall Street 2.0, Computers Are King

Originally published on Sat August 18, 2012 2:03 pm

Weekend Edition Saturday host Scott Simon talks to Sean Gourley, physicist and founder of quid.com, about the computers that trade stock shares faster than human minds can comprehend.

Pages