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Talk of the Nation on 89.5-1

Weekdays at 1pm
Neal Conan

When Americans want to be a part of the national conversation, they turn to Talk of the Nation, NPR's live, midday news-talk program. Host Neal Conan leads a productive exchange of ideas and opinions on the issues that dominate the news landscape.

From breaking news, science, and education to religion and the arts, Talk of the Nation offers listeners the opportunity to join enlightening discussions with decision-makers, authors, academicians, and artists from around the world.

For two hours each Monday through Thursday, Talk of the Nation listeners weigh-in, share their thoughts and ask questions by calling, emailing, messaging through social media.

On Fridays the conversation turns to the topics of science, with Talk of the Nation Science Friday with Ira Flatow, focusing on news and issues about the world of science and technology. For show listings and archives, visit here.

 

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Politics
12:59 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

The Legacy Of Watergate And The Semantics Of Scandals

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 1:34 pm

Forty years after the Senate committee hearings on the Watergate scandal, Political Junkie Ken Rudin talks with Lowell Weicker, who served on the Senate Watergate committee. Former White House speechwriters Paul Glastris and Peter Robinson talk about writing speeches amid scandal.

Health
12:59 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

Fighting To Breathe: Living With COPD

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 1:21 pm

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive lung disease that slowly robs sufferers of the ability to breathe. COPD is the third leading cause of death in the U.S., surpassed only by cancer and heart disease. There are treatments, but no cure for the disease.

Television
2:42 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Unhappy Endings: When Our TV Show Worlds Get Rocked

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Lynn Neary.

Fans of "Game of Thrones" are well-aware by now that George R. R. Martin, author of the popular book series, is not afraid to kill off his characters. Those who read the books are way ahead of those who discovered the series through HBO. TV viewers were stunned when the first season ended with the graphic beheading of the man everyone thought was the hero of the saga. Season three, which just ended, offered more violent and unexpected deaths.

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Law
1:20 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Justice And Jury Selection: Judging Jurors Before A Trial

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Lynn Neary in Washington; Neal Conan is away. For the second day in a row, lawyers questioned potential jurors in the George Zimmerman trial. Zimmerman is charged with second-degree murder for the shooting death of Trayvon Martin in Sanford, Florida, last year.

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Music
1:10 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

As An Indie Musician, Chad Lawson Finds 'The Space Between'

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 2:08 pm

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

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NPR Story
1:10 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

'One And Only': The Argument For Raising Just One

Lauren Sandler is a journalist, only child, and mother of one.
Justin Lane

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 2:03 pm

In 1907, the first president of the American Psychological Association called only children "sickly, selfish, strange, and stupid." He concluded that "being an only child is a disease in itself."

In her book One and Only: The Freedom of Having an Only Child, and the Joy of Being One, journalist Lauren Sandler takes on these stereotypes and sifts through a huge body of research that debunks many of the worst myths about only children.

Sandler, an only child and mother of one, talks to NPR's Lynn Neary about the joys of raising just one.

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Medical Treatments
1:05 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

The Promise In Unraveling The Mysteries Of Rare Diseases

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 2:13 pm

As a child, Jeannie Peeper was diagnosed with fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva, an extremely rare disease that causes a second skeleton to grow inside the body. Peeper and science writer Carl Zimmer discuss the efforts of a small group to fund research to battle the disease.

National Security
1:03 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

Opinion Roundup: Edward Snowden And The NSA Leaks

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 3:07 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. And we focus today on what we now know about U.S. government information sweeps of telephone and Internet data and on the man who now admits he disclosed the top secret documents to The Guardian and the Washington Post.

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NPR Story
12:38 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

'Matilda' Star Mara Wilson On Why Child Actors 'Go Crazy'

Mara Wilson, 25, was a child actor who starred in Matilda and Mrs. Doubtfire.
Ari Scott

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 7:50 am

After years in movies and TV shows, some child actors end up making headlines later in life for stints in rehab, or ongoing legal battles. But not all former child stars become tabloid fodder. Some leave Hollywood behind and pursue other careers.

Mara Wilson, who starred in Matilda, Mrs. Doubtfire and Miracle on 34th Street, was able to avoid the drama. Wilson, 25, graduated from New York University in 2009 and is now a writer and playwright based in New York.

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Medical Treatments
12:33 pm
Fri June 7, 2013

Promising Results In Early Trial of Novel MS Treatment

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. In the disease multiple sclerosis, the body's own immune cells stage a mutiny. Those cells, white cells, normally go after foreigners in the body like bacteria or other invaders that make us sick. But in MS, the immune cells go after the body itself, attacking the myelin covering that wraps around nerve cells. As that myelin gets degraded, nerve signals don't get transferred properly, and that's what leads to the symptoms of MS.

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