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Talk of the Nation on 89.5-1

Weekdays at 1pm
Neal Conan

When Americans want to be a part of the national conversation, they turn to Talk of the Nation, NPR's live, midday news-talk program. Host Neal Conan leads a productive exchange of ideas and opinions on the issues that dominate the news landscape.

From breaking news, science, and education to religion and the arts, Talk of the Nation offers listeners the opportunity to join enlightening discussions with decision-makers, authors, academicians, and artists from around the world.

For two hours each Monday through Thursday, Talk of the Nation listeners weigh-in, share their thoughts and ask questions by calling, emailing, messaging through social media.

On Fridays the conversation turns to the topics of science, with Talk of the Nation Science Friday with Ira Flatow, focusing on news and issues about the world of science and technology. For show listings and archives, visit here.

 

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Television
12:00 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Wendell Pierce On 'The Wire,' 'Treme' And Food

When actor Wendell Pierce returned to his native New Orleans to help rebuild after Hurricane Katrina, he noticed a lack of grocery stores selling fresh food. Now, Pierce is opening Sterling Farms — a chain of stores in the Ninth Ward that will sell food at affordable prices for low-income shoppers.

From Our Listeners
12:00 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Letters: Homeless Hotspots And Earworms

NPR's Neal Conan reads from listener comments on previous show topics including the controversy over homeless hotspots, why some songs get stuck in our heads, and sober advice for former Illinois Governor Blagojevich as he begins a long sentence in federal prison.

The Impact of War
12:00 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Grading The Military's Mental Health Screenings

Originally published on Tue March 20, 2012 1:43 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. On Thursday, Staff Sergeant Robert Bales is expected to be charged with the murder of 16 civilians in Afghanistan. A court martial may eventually explain what happened and why, but there are other questions that arise from this atrocity that need answers.

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NPR Story
12:00 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Iditarod Winner Dallas Seavey Raced Against Family

2012 Iditarod winner Dallas Seavey's team climbs a hill. Seavy has guest riders on his sled for the ceremonial start of the race.
Frank Kovalchek Flickr

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:56 am

After more than a week of grueling days on a dog sled, Dallas Seavey won 2012's Iditarod, beating his father and grandfather in the process. The race took off from Willow, Alaska, on March 4, Seavey's 25th birthday. Nine days, 4 hours and 29 minutes later, he crossed the finish line in Nome as the youngest musher ever to win the race.

Seavey talks with NPR's Neal Conan about the extreme conditions of the Iditarod, from freezing dogs to sleepless nights, and what it means to be in a legacy racing family.

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Law
12:00 pm
Mon March 19, 2012

How Do You Define A Hate Crime?

Former Rutgers student Dharun Ravi could face 10 years in prison and deportation to his native India after being convicted of bias intimidation. Ravi used a webcam to spy on his roommate, Tyler Clementi, having an intimate encounter with another man. Clementi killed himself several days later.

History
12:00 pm
Mon March 19, 2012

Women Once Again In Crossfire Of Culture Wars

In recent months, a swarm of controversies have erupted over issues of women's health — from the split in the Catholic church over employer coverage of contraceptives to the proposed ultrasound laws in Virginia and Texas to the uproar over funding for Planned Parenthood.

Opinion
12:00 pm
Mon March 19, 2012

Op-Ed: Shooting Of Black Teen Reveals 'Blindness'

Three weeks after 17-year-old Trayvon Martin was shot and killed by neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman, no arrests have been made in what critics are calling a case of racial profiling. Columnist Leonard Pitts says the incident exposes society's "blindness" to African-Americans.

NPR Story
12:00 pm
Fri March 16, 2012

Adam Riess: One Cosmic Puzzle Solved, Many To Go

Astrophysicist Adam Riess shared the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2011 for his work on distant supernovae, which demonstrated that the universe was not only expanding--but that its expansion was accelerating. Now he's hunting for clues that might explain why, and one of the prime suspects is a mysterious force known as dark energy.

NPR Story
12:00 pm
Fri March 16, 2012

Mount Everest Still Holds Mysteries For Scientists

Originally published on Fri March 16, 2012 12:03 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

The world's tallest peak. It's so iconic. It's so classic. You'd think we'd have learned everything there is to know about it by now, but you'd be wrong. Scientists still can't even agree on the exact height of the mountain. And what's more, they're not even sure what kind of rocks the mountaintop is made of.

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NPR Story
12:00 pm
Fri March 16, 2012

Sizing Up America's High-Tech Talent

Business and political leaders have repeatedly warned that America's scientists and engineers are in short supply. However, some economists say the numbers indicate the opposite — a glut of high-tech workers. A panel of experts debate whether America's schools produce the scientific workforce needed to compete globally.

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