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Neal Conan

When Americans want to be a part of the national conversation, they turn to Talk of the Nation, NPR's live, midday news-talk program. Host Neal Conan leads a productive exchange of ideas and opinions on the issues that dominate the news landscape.

From breaking news, science, and education to religion and the arts, Talk of the Nation offers listeners the opportunity to join enlightening discussions with decision-makers, authors, academicians, and artists from around the world.

For two hours each Monday through Thursday, Talk of the Nation listeners weigh-in, share their thoughts and ask questions by calling, emailing, messaging through social media.

On Fridays the conversation turns to the topics of science, with Talk of the Nation Science Friday with Ira Flatow, focusing on news and issues about the world of science and technology. For show listings and archives, visit here.

 

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NPR Story
12:05 pm
Fri May 4, 2012

Antidote For Cocaine Overdose Shows Promise

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 4:39 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. Stroke, kidney failure, seizures are some of the devastating effects of a cocaine overdose that kill thousands of people each year. But new research has created hope that a cocaine overdose antidote may soon be available for doctors who administer in emergency situations.

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NPR Story
12:05 pm
Fri May 4, 2012

Actress Mayim Bialik On TV, Science, And The Combo

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 4:39 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

Depending on how old you are, you may know my next guest as the girl who played the young Bette Midler in "Beaches" or as the star of the '90s sit-down "Blossom," sitcom "Blossom" or as Amy Farrah Fowler, Sheldon Cooper's sort-of girlfriend on "The Big Bang Theory." Or maybe you know her as all three.

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NPR Story
12:05 pm
Fri May 4, 2012

Gauging Public Opinion on Climate Change Policy

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 4:39 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

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NPR Story
1:16 pm
Thu May 3, 2012

'Be Richer' By Learning From Parents' Mistakes

Money — how to make it, and what to do with it when you have it — can be problematic for recent graduates.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 10:29 am

College seniors graduating in 2012 face a sluggish economy, bleak job prospects and a mountain of student loan debt. To make matters worse, many don't have the first clue about how to manage their personal finances.

Author Zac Bissonnette, a recent college graduate himself, learned how to handle money by watching his parents' mistakes and ignoring most of their advice. He put himself through college without loans, scholarships or help from his parents.

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Around the Nation
12:12 pm
Thu May 3, 2012

OWS: A Case Study In Social Movements

Originally published on Thu May 3, 2012 1:16 pm

On May Day, the Occupy Wall Street movement re-emerged to try to reestablish its message and place in the national conversation. Thousands marched in New York City, Oakland and other cities, then quickly faded from national view. Guests consider what sustains social movements, and why some fail.

On Aging
12:12 pm
Thu May 3, 2012

Confronting Your Crown: Male Pattern Baldness

"Macho types are inspired by the likes of Jason Statham," pictured here, writes Daniel Jones.
Max Nash AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 9:33 am

Men dealing with male pattern baldness have decisions to make — go with a comb over, take medication, get hair plugs or a toupee, or do nothing at all.

When New York Times contributing editor Daniel Jones started losing his hair, he chose what he considers a "cooler alternative" — head shaving.

"Losing your hair," he tells NPR's Neal Conan, "is a little bit like a girlfriend who's sort of drifting away, and you're clinging to her as she goes off and sees other people. ... It gets worse and worse. So it's better to take some sort of pre-emptive move."

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Around the Nation
12:12 pm
Thu May 3, 2012

What's So Compelling About Skyscrapers

Rising above the Manhattan skyline: 1 World Trade Center.
Don Emmert AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 12:56 pm

After the terrorist attacks that brought down the twin towers in Manhattan, many said it was the end of an era for skyscrapers. New York City proved them wrong. The building constructed to replace the towers, 1 World Trade Center, has risen above 1,250 feet and surpassed the Empire State Building as the tallest in New York.

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Education
1:04 pm
Wed May 2, 2012

The Best Ways To Integrate Special Needs Students

Originally published on Wed May 2, 2012 1:50 pm

Budget cuts in many school districts have some parents and teachers questioning whether they have the resources to support their students. NPR education correspondent Claudio Sanchez and Thomas Hehir of Harvard University talk about how to integrate special needs students into mainstream classrooms.

Children's Health
1:04 pm
Wed May 2, 2012

What's Lost When Kids Don't Ride Bikes To School

Originally published on Wed May 2, 2012 1:53 pm

As childhood obesity rates continue to rise, schools and parents look for ways to get kids off the couch. But the number of students who walk or ride their bikes to school has dropped from 48% in 1969 to just 13% in 2009. David Darlington talks about his Bicycling article, "Why Johnny Can't Ride."

Politics
1:04 pm
Wed May 2, 2012

Rubio, Ryan, Portman, Christie: Who Will Be VP?

Originally published on Wed May 2, 2012 1:23 pm

Mitt Romney, the presumed GOP presidential candidate, continues to try out potential running mates, though most deny any interest in the job. Sen. Marco Rubio, Rep. Paul Ryan, Sen. Rob Portman, Gov. Chris Christie and others have all made high-profile comments in recent days.

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