StudioTulsa on 89.5-1

Weekdays 11:30am and 7:30pm
  • Hosted by Rich Fisher

StudioTulsa features down-to-earth interviews that make sense of complex issues and offer new perspectives on topics we might take for granted. It's an award-winning program covering the arts, sciences, news events, books, politics, culture, economics, history, social trends, the media, the humanities, and so forth --- and it's been a popular show here at Public Radio Tulsa ever since it began in August of 1992.

Medical Mondays with Dr. John Schumann are heard each Monday.

The program is hosted by Rich Fisher and produced/edited by Scott Gregory.

Visit the StudioTulsa Archives.

On today's program, we offer a linguistic/semantic discussion of technology and culture --- what these two terms mean, what they've meant, what they mean in America as opposed to Europe, and where the ideas behind these terms overlap.

Tomorrow night (Thursday the 19th) at 7pm, Temple Israel in Tulsa (at 2004 East 22nd Place, near Utica Square) will host the 15th Annual Interfaith Holocaust Commemoration; this year's commemoration is entitled "Why Memory Matters: Israel's Yad Vashem." The featured speaker at this event will be Dr. Mordecai Paldiel, the former director of the Department of the Righteous at Yad Vashem, which is Israel’s Holocaust authority. Dr. Paldiel, who's also our guest today on ST, is a leading authority on rescue during the Holocaust.

On today's StudioTulsa, which is a re-broadcast of a program that first aired back in January, we speak with Clay Johnson about his interesting new book, "The Information Diet: A Case for Conscious Consumption." Everyone knows that many of us --- perhaps most of us --- seem obsessed with information these days. We incessantly check our favorite websites, texts, instant messages, emails, downloads, videos, status updates, tweets, etc.

A century ago, women could not own property or vote. Today, women are the primary wage earners in about 40% of American households, and are poised to be a majority within twenty years if current trends continue. Washington Post staff writer Liza Mundy calls it "The Big Flip" and examines this huge cultural shift and its impact on gender roles, relationships, and social dynamics.

On today's show, we meet Bill Courtney, volunteer football coach of the impoverished North Memphis Manassas High School Tigers, and subject of the 2012 Oscar-winning documentary, "Undefeated." Filmmakers Dan Lindsay and T. J. Martin followed the coach and team through the 2009 season which found them on the verge of winning their first high school playoff game ever.

On today's edition of our show, we speak by phone with Lawrence Lessig, who is the Roy L. Furman Professor of Law and Leadership at Harvard Law School and the Director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University.  A widely respected legal scholar and political activist, Lessig is known for his efforts to promote reduced legal restrictions on copyright as well as trademark laws --- particularly as these relate to the Internet and to other technology-based applications --- and for his sharp criticism of how Big Money has profoundly corrupted American politics.

On today's show, we hear from Susan Barrett, an associate professor in the TU Department of Theatre and Musical Theatre. Barrett is directing a new production of the Tony Award-winning musical, "The Drowsy Chaperone," which opened on Broadway in 2006. As Barrett tells us, this funny and terrifically fun-to-watch musical actually began as a spoof --- written for a wedding reception --- of old-time musicals . . . and of the out-dated styles, politically incorrect jokes, and wonderful, jazzy tunes that tend to define such musicals.

On today's program, we speak with Tulsa Public Schools Superintendent Dr. Keith Ballard, who --- like every other school system administrator across Oklahoma --- is working hard to deal with the new reality of reduced state expenditures for education. Indeed, such aid is now lower than it was four years ago. Less and less money for schools, teachers, classrooms, and textbooks means more and more to be alarmed about, according to Dr.

On today's show, a discussion of the nascent but rapidly growing "D.I.Y. fabrication movement" occurring in America today. Our guest is Dale Dougherty, the founder/publisher of Make Magazine (see makezine.com) --- and one of the leading voices in this movement. Our own Hardesty Center for Fab Lab Tulsa, which just opened for business a few months ago (and which is one of only 100 or so fab labs worldwide), is hosting the 2012 US Fab Lab Symposium here in T-Town, from April 10th through the 12th.

"What Teachers Make"

Apr 6, 2012

On today's show, we speak by phone with the noted performance poet, former middle-school teacher, and current teachers' advocate Taylor Mali. His new book --- "What Teachers Make: In Praise of the Greatest Job in the World" --- is based on a poem that he wrote several years ago, a spirited and encouraging defense of the teaching profession that has, by now, been seen and forwarded millions of times on Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, and elsewhere. It's a poem that gave heart to an entire movement --- and in this book we get the story of what drove Mali to compose that poem in the first place.

On our show today, which first aired last year, we explore an epic series of political struggles, leadership battles, and strategic deals and double-crossings --- not in Washington, DC; nor in the underworld of organized crime; but in the ancient world. Our guest is James Romm, a professor of Greek language, literature, and history at Bard College.

On today's StudioTulsa, we look back on the award-winning career of TV journalist Bob Brown, who earned a BS at the University of Tulsa in 1968. Brown held radio and television positions in Tulsa, Houston, and Dallas before joining ABC News in New York in 1977. In 1980, he was assigned to the staff of a then-new program called 20/20, where he would remain for the next thirty years. At his retirement in 2009, Brown had been honored with six Emmy awards, the Investigative Reporters Award, and the prestigious Alfred I.

On today's show, we speak with Joshua Piker, an associate professor of history at the University of Oklahoma. Prof. Piker will give the 2012 Cadenhead-Settle Memorial Lecture, which is presented annually by the TU Department of History, on Thursday of this week (the 5th) at 6pm at the Gilcrease Museum in Tulsa. His lecture is entitled, "The Four Deaths of Acorn Whistler: Telling Stories on the Colonial American Frontier," and it's based on a book that Prof. Piker is just now completing.

Today on ST, we chat with Paul Chihara (born 1938 in Seattle), a film and TV composer who's been active in Hollywood since the 1970s. Interestingly, Chihara is also a well-respected and prolific composer of classical music --- from avant-garde works to mainstream, highly melodic pieces; from symphonies and concertos to chamber music, choral compositions, and ballets --- and he's still, today, writing music for noted orchestras throughout the country.

Should we --- could we --- really do away with the personal income tax here in Oklahoma? The State Legislature is now considering various proposals to reduce and/or eliminate the state's personal income tax; these proposals are largely based on a study prepared for the Oklahoma Council of Public Affairs by economist (and former Reagan administration economic advisor) Arthur Laffer and his colleagues. But what if this study is, in fact, bogus? That's the claim now being made by a number of well-respected economists across the state.

Today on our program we speak by phone with Michelle Dammon Loyalka, a freelance journalist and editor, who's just put out a new book (from the University of California Press) called "Eating Bitterness: Stories from the Front Lines of China's Great Urban Migration." Praised in Publishers Weekly as "a thorough and insightful examination of the gritty, arduous side of the Chinese economic miracle," this book profiles eight different migrant peasants in contemporary China --- an impossibly vast and rapidly changing country where, each year, some 200 million such migrants travel from the countr

On today's show, we speak with Dr. Laurence Smith, a professor of geography at UCLA, about his much-discussed book, "The World in 2050: Four Forces Shaping Civilization's Northern Future," which first appeared in 2010 (and which The Wall Street Journal called "lively and impressive...[and] among the first in what promises to be an important publishing category, the explication of how the human landscape will be altered by artificially triggered climate change"). Dr.

On our show today, we speak with the accomplished and award-winning teacher and educational theorist who coined the term "culturally responsive pedagogy" --- Gloria Ladson-Billings --- who is the Kellner Family Professor of Urban Education in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

On today's show, we chat with Dr. John Henning Schumann, a writer, internist, and medical educator at the University of Oklahoma's School of Community Medicine here in Tulsa. Earlier this month, Dr. Schumann wrote an article for The Atlantic entitled "The Doctor Is Out: Young Talent Is Turning Away From Primary Care" (which you can view here). As Dr. Schumann notes in this piece: "It's no secret that there's a looming crisis in primary care.

On today's program, which revisits an interview that we originally aired in September of last year, we hear from the veteran author, critic, and scholar Andrew Delbanco, who is the Chair of American Studies at Columbia University as well as a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and The New Republic.

On today's show, which originally aired late last year, we speak with Keith Recker, the co-author of an interesting and visually striking new book called "Pantone: The Twentieth Century in Color." Pantone, LLC, is known and referred to worldwide for its color systems, which are routinely used in digital and print publishing, fashion, plastics, architecture, interiors, paints, and so on. Indeed, Pantone's colors are seen as the universal language for accurate color communication --- and in this book, we're presented with the cultural history of 20th-century America in terms of these colors.

On today's program, which first aired last fall, we hear from the longtime New Yorker Magazine writer and bestselling author Ian Frazier, whose latest book (now in paperback) is "Travels in Siberia," which the San Francisco Chronicle has called "a masterpiece of nonfiction writing --- tragic, bizarre, and funny." Further, as one critic of this book has noted in The New York Times Book Review: "['Travels in Siberia' is] an uproarious, sometimes dark yarn filled with dubious meals, broken-down vehicles, abandoned slave-labor camps, and ubiquitous statues of Lenin --- 'On the Road' meets 'The

On today's program, an encore broadcast of a show that first aired back in November, we hear from Kristen Oertel, who holds the Barnard Chair in 19th-Century American History here at the University of Tulsa. Oertel has co-written a new and award-winning book (just out from the University Press of Kansas) called "Frontier Feminist: Clarina Howard Nichols and the Politics of Motherhood." It's a remarkable biography of a little-remembered yet vitally important American woman who meaningfully participated in several of the crucial social/political movements of her time.

On our show today, we visit with John M. Henshaw, the Harry H. Rogers Professor of Mechanical Engineering and chair of the Department of Engineering here at the University of Tulsa. Professor Henshaw's new book, just out from Johns Hopkins University Press, is "A Tour of the Senses: How Your Brain Interprets the World." This book offers an engaging and accessible (yet also scholarly and up-to-the-minute) consideration of the five senses --- taste, smell, touch, sight, and hearing --- and, moreover, of how these senses influence and affect one another.

The Tulsa PAC @ 35

Mar 15, 2012

Thirty-five years ago, in March of 1977, in the heart of downtown, the Tulsa Performing Arts Center first opened its doors --- and Ella Fitzgerald, backed by the Tulsa Philharmonic, offered this beloved venue's debut performance. Built with a combination of public and private funds, following a 1973 bond issue, the Tulsa PAC is owned and operated by the City of Tulsa; it remains a leading arts/cultural/performance space for Tulsans of all ages and backgrounds.

bobwoodward.com

StudioTulsa host Rich Fisher spoke with Bob Woodward, who will be on campus as part of this Spring's Presidential Lecture Series. In this web-exclusive interview, they discuss the span of Woodward's career and events affecting Barack Obama's presidency.

Ever felt like quitting the whole earning-and-buying rat race? Ever wondered what it'd be like to live without a wallet, a car, a mortgage, or even a roof over your head?

Today we're speaking about the intersection of law and politics at the highest levels of American society --- which is to say, we're discussing the workings of the U.S. Supreme Court, both then and now --- and our guest is a highly regarded expert in this regard, Professor Martin Shapiro of the UC-Berkeley School of Law. Prof. Shapiro gave two free-to-the-public lectures here at TU last week, when he spoke as a part of the TU College of Law's 2012 Lectureship in Politics and Law.

[Aired on Monday, March 12th.] On today's show, we speak by phone with Lisa See, the bestselling author of "Shanghai Girls," "Peony in Love," "Snow Flower and the Secret Fan," "Dragon Bones," and other novels, as well as the acclaimed memoir, "On Gold Mountain." See's latest book, just out in paperback, is a novel called "Dreams of Joy," which she tells us about on today's ST.

Our guest today is Terrie Correll, the CEO of Tulsa Zoo Management, Inc. (or TZMI). It's been about a year since the Tulsa Zoo moved from being a city-owned facility to a public-private partnership, and earlier this week, the impending benefits of this move were made readily apparent by the announcement of the zoo's brand-new master plan. As Correll tells us, it's a 20-year master plan that was commissioned by TZMI --- and that describes what the zoo's exhibits, features, facilities, and events will look like in the years to come, as well as where these will be located. The St.

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