StudioTulsa on 89.5-1

Weekdays 11:30am and 7:30pm
  • Hosted by Rich Fisher

StudioTulsa features down-to-earth interviews that make sense of complex issues and offer new perspectives on topics we might take for granted. It's an award-winning program covering the arts, sciences, news events, books, politics, culture, economics, history, social trends, the media, the humanities, and so forth --- and it's been a popular show here at Public Radio Tulsa ever since it began in August of 1992.

Medical Mondays with Dr. John Schumann are heard each Monday.

The program is hosted by Rich Fisher and produced/edited by Scott Gregory.

Visit the StudioTulsa Archives.

"What Teachers Make"

Apr 6, 2012

On today's show, we speak by phone with the noted performance poet, former middle-school teacher, and current teachers' advocate Taylor Mali. His new book --- "What Teachers Make: In Praise of the Greatest Job in the World" --- is based on a poem that he wrote several years ago, a spirited and encouraging defense of the teaching profession that has, by now, been seen and forwarded millions of times on Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, and elsewhere. It's a poem that gave heart to an entire movement --- and in this book we get the story of what drove Mali to compose that poem in the first place.

On our show today, which first aired last year, we explore an epic series of political struggles, leadership battles, and strategic deals and double-crossings --- not in Washington, DC; nor in the underworld of organized crime; but in the ancient world. Our guest is James Romm, a professor of Greek language, literature, and history at Bard College.

On today's StudioTulsa, we look back on the award-winning career of TV journalist Bob Brown, who earned a BS at the University of Tulsa in 1968. Brown held radio and television positions in Tulsa, Houston, and Dallas before joining ABC News in New York in 1977. In 1980, he was assigned to the staff of a then-new program called 20/20, where he would remain for the next thirty years. At his retirement in 2009, Brown had been honored with six Emmy awards, the Investigative Reporters Award, and the prestigious Alfred I.

On today's show, we speak with Joshua Piker, an associate professor of history at the University of Oklahoma. Prof. Piker will give the 2012 Cadenhead-Settle Memorial Lecture, which is presented annually by the TU Department of History, on Thursday of this week (the 5th) at 6pm at the Gilcrease Museum in Tulsa. His lecture is entitled, "The Four Deaths of Acorn Whistler: Telling Stories on the Colonial American Frontier," and it's based on a book that Prof. Piker is just now completing.

Today on ST, we chat with Paul Chihara (born 1938 in Seattle), a film and TV composer who's been active in Hollywood since the 1970s. Interestingly, Chihara is also a well-respected and prolific composer of classical music --- from avant-garde works to mainstream, highly melodic pieces; from symphonies and concertos to chamber music, choral compositions, and ballets --- and he's still, today, writing music for noted orchestras throughout the country.

Should we --- could we --- really do away with the personal income tax here in Oklahoma? The State Legislature is now considering various proposals to reduce and/or eliminate the state's personal income tax; these proposals are largely based on a study prepared for the Oklahoma Council of Public Affairs by economist (and former Reagan administration economic advisor) Arthur Laffer and his colleagues. But what if this study is, in fact, bogus? That's the claim now being made by a number of well-respected economists across the state.

Today on our program we speak by phone with Michelle Dammon Loyalka, a freelance journalist and editor, who's just put out a new book (from the University of California Press) called "Eating Bitterness: Stories from the Front Lines of China's Great Urban Migration." Praised in Publishers Weekly as "a thorough and insightful examination of the gritty, arduous side of the Chinese economic miracle," this book profiles eight different migrant peasants in contemporary China --- an impossibly vast and rapidly changing country where, each year, some 200 million such migrants travel from the countr

On today's show, we speak with Dr. Laurence Smith, a professor of geography at UCLA, about his much-discussed book, "The World in 2050: Four Forces Shaping Civilization's Northern Future," which first appeared in 2010 (and which The Wall Street Journal called "lively and impressive...[and] among the first in what promises to be an important publishing category, the explication of how the human landscape will be altered by artificially triggered climate change"). Dr.

On our show today, we speak with the accomplished and award-winning teacher and educational theorist who coined the term "culturally responsive pedagogy" --- Gloria Ladson-Billings --- who is the Kellner Family Professor of Urban Education in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

On today's show, we chat with Dr. John Henning Schumann, a writer, internist, and medical educator at the University of Oklahoma's School of Community Medicine here in Tulsa. Earlier this month, Dr. Schumann wrote an article for The Atlantic entitled "The Doctor Is Out: Young Talent Is Turning Away From Primary Care" (which you can view here). As Dr. Schumann notes in this piece: "It's no secret that there's a looming crisis in primary care.

On today's program, which revisits an interview that we originally aired in September of last year, we hear from the veteran author, critic, and scholar Andrew Delbanco, who is the Chair of American Studies at Columbia University as well as a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and The New Republic.

On today's show, which originally aired late last year, we speak with Keith Recker, the co-author of an interesting and visually striking new book called "Pantone: The Twentieth Century in Color." Pantone, LLC, is known and referred to worldwide for its color systems, which are routinely used in digital and print publishing, fashion, plastics, architecture, interiors, paints, and so on. Indeed, Pantone's colors are seen as the universal language for accurate color communication --- and in this book, we're presented with the cultural history of 20th-century America in terms of these colors.

On today's program, which first aired last fall, we hear from the longtime New Yorker Magazine writer and bestselling author Ian Frazier, whose latest book (now in paperback) is "Travels in Siberia," which the San Francisco Chronicle has called "a masterpiece of nonfiction writing --- tragic, bizarre, and funny." Further, as one critic of this book has noted in The New York Times Book Review: "['Travels in Siberia' is] an uproarious, sometimes dark yarn filled with dubious meals, broken-down vehicles, abandoned slave-labor camps, and ubiquitous statues of Lenin --- 'On the Road' meets 'The

On today's program, an encore broadcast of a show that first aired back in November, we hear from Kristen Oertel, who holds the Barnard Chair in 19th-Century American History here at the University of Tulsa. Oertel has co-written a new and award-winning book (just out from the University Press of Kansas) called "Frontier Feminist: Clarina Howard Nichols and the Politics of Motherhood." It's a remarkable biography of a little-remembered yet vitally important American woman who meaningfully participated in several of the crucial social/political movements of her time.

On our show today, we visit with John M. Henshaw, the Harry H. Rogers Professor of Mechanical Engineering and chair of the Department of Engineering here at the University of Tulsa. Professor Henshaw's new book, just out from Johns Hopkins University Press, is "A Tour of the Senses: How Your Brain Interprets the World." This book offers an engaging and accessible (yet also scholarly and up-to-the-minute) consideration of the five senses --- taste, smell, touch, sight, and hearing --- and, moreover, of how these senses influence and affect one another.

The Tulsa PAC @ 35

Mar 15, 2012

Thirty-five years ago, in March of 1977, in the heart of downtown, the Tulsa Performing Arts Center first opened its doors --- and Ella Fitzgerald, backed by the Tulsa Philharmonic, offered this beloved venue's debut performance. Built with a combination of public and private funds, following a 1973 bond issue, the Tulsa PAC is owned and operated by the City of Tulsa; it remains a leading arts/cultural/performance space for Tulsans of all ages and backgrounds.

bobwoodward.com

StudioTulsa host Rich Fisher spoke with Bob Woodward, who will be on campus as part of this Spring's Presidential Lecture Series. In this web-exclusive interview, they discuss the span of Woodward's career and events affecting Barack Obama's presidency.

Ever felt like quitting the whole earning-and-buying rat race? Ever wondered what it'd be like to live without a wallet, a car, a mortgage, or even a roof over your head?

Today we're speaking about the intersection of law and politics at the highest levels of American society --- which is to say, we're discussing the workings of the U.S. Supreme Court, both then and now --- and our guest is a highly regarded expert in this regard, Professor Martin Shapiro of the UC-Berkeley School of Law. Prof. Shapiro gave two free-to-the-public lectures here at TU last week, when he spoke as a part of the TU College of Law's 2012 Lectureship in Politics and Law.

[Aired on Monday, March 12th.] On today's show, we speak by phone with Lisa See, the bestselling author of "Shanghai Girls," "Peony in Love," "Snow Flower and the Secret Fan," "Dragon Bones," and other novels, as well as the acclaimed memoir, "On Gold Mountain." See's latest book, just out in paperback, is a novel called "Dreams of Joy," which she tells us about on today's ST.

Our guest today is Terrie Correll, the CEO of Tulsa Zoo Management, Inc. (or TZMI). It's been about a year since the Tulsa Zoo moved from being a city-owned facility to a public-private partnership, and earlier this week, the impending benefits of this move were made readily apparent by the announcement of the zoo's brand-new master plan. As Correll tells us, it's a 20-year master plan that was commissioned by TZMI --- and that describes what the zoo's exhibits, features, facilities, and events will look like in the years to come, as well as where these will be located. The St.

© Ibbob Music Inc. / Photo credit: Oliver Rossberg

[Aired Thursday, March 8th.] While growing up in Philadelphia, Benny Golson (born 1929) --- our guest today on StudioTulsa --- jammed and woodshedded with the likes of John Coltrane, Red Garland, Jimmy Heath, Philly Joe Jones, and Red Rodney. Later, he played alongside the great be-bop composer/pianist/arranger Tadd Dameron --- a major influence, and a mentor of sorts --- before doing stints with such notable bandleaders as Lionel Hampton, Dizzy Gillespie, Art Blakey, and Tulsa's own Earl Bostic.

[Aired Wednesday, March 7th.] Today we speak with Dr. David Cook, who has been on our show several times before, has been a member of the Theatre faculty here at the University of Tulsa for more than 30 years, and has announced that he'll retire at the end of this school year. Therefore, Cook is currently directing his final production for the TU Theatre Department: Thornton Wilder's iconic American masterpiece, "Our Town," which opens tomorrow night (Thursday the 8th) and runs through Sunday afternoon (the 11th) at the Chapman Theater in Kendall Hall on the TU campus.

[Aired Tuesday, March 6th.] On today's show, we speak with the New York-based poet Erica Hunt, who'll give a free-to-the-public reading of her poetry tonight on the TU campus. Her reading is presented by the TU Department of English / Creative Writing; it takes place in the Faculty Study of McFarlin Library, beginning at 7:30pm. As we learn on today's show, Hunt has also worked as a housing organizer, radio producer, poetry teacher, and social justice advocate.

[Aired on Monday, March 5th.] On today's show, we look ahead to the exciting and far-reaching day-long symposium, "Different Shades of Red: Woody Guthrie and the Oklahoma Experience at 100," which will happen on Saturday the 10th at the University of Tulsa's Lorton Performance Center. Our guest is Brian Hosmer of TU's Department of History; he's serving as the committee chair for this symposium.

[Aired on Friday, March 2nd.] Book reviewer Nancy Pearl joins us to talk about the best new books of 2012 and a few overlooked gems from the past couple of years. Pearl is the author of six highly regarded "books about books" in her Book Lust series, and she's embarking as the series editor for "Book Lust Discoveries," which will revive twelve classic, long-out-of-print titles that are worth a fresh read. The series gets underway in April with Merle Miller's "A Gay and Melancholy Sound."

Here's Nancy's latest picks:

[Aired on Thursday, March 1st.] Today, we speak with Jamal Joseph, whose new memoir is "Panther Baby: A Life of Rebellion and Reinvention." This engrossing autobiography --- a gritty yet hopeful hybrid of coming-of-age candor, street-savvy wisdom, and recent socio-political history --- follows Jospeph from his early years in the Bronx and Harlem, to incarceration stints in Riker’s Island and then Leavenworth, to the Film School faculty of Columbia University.

[Aired on Wednesday, February 29th.] (Note: This show originally aired last year.) Today we speak with the music historian, writer, and educator Harvey Sachs, whose latest book, just out in paperback from Random House, is "The Ninth: Beethoven and the World in 1824." It's a fascinating, in-depth, and wonderfully readable account of the creation and reception of one of the world's immortal pieces of music: Beethoven's Ninth Symphony.

[Aired on Tuesday, February 28th.] On today's program, we chat by phone with Dr. Lenn Goodman, Mellon Professor of Humanities and Professor of Philosophy at Vanderbilt University. He'll present the Annual Snuggs Lecture in Religion tomorrow night (Wednesday the 29th) at 7:30pm in Helmerich Hall on the TU campus; the lecture is free to the public and is entitled "Creation and Evolution." An award-winning scholar and prolific author, Dr.

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