StudioTulsa on 89.5-1

Weekdays 11:30am and 7:30pm
  • Hosted by Rich Fisher

StudioTulsa features down-to-earth interviews that make sense of complex issues and offer new perspectives on topics we might take for granted. It's an award-winning program covering the arts, sciences, news events, books, politics, culture, economics, history, social trends, the media, the humanities, and so forth --- and it's been a popular show here at Public Radio Tulsa ever since it began in August of 1992.

Medical Mondays with Dr. John Schumann are heard each Monday.

The program is hosted by Rich Fisher and produced/edited by Scott Gregory.

Visit the StudioTulsa Archives.

Alzheimer's Disease is the 6th leading cause of death in the United States. More than 5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer's -- and by 2050, this number could be as high as 16 million. Alzheimer's Disease kills more people annually than breast cancer and prostate cancer combined. And every 66 seconds, someone in the U.S. develops Alzheimer's Disease.

Our guest on StudioTulsa Medical Monday is Kylla Lanier, the Tulsa-based deputy director of Truckers Against Trafficking, or TAT, which is a nonprofit that aims to, per its mission statement, "educate, equip, empower, and mobilize members of the trucking and travel plaza industry to combat domestic sex trafficking." Among other things, Lanier tells us about TAT's "industry training program." As noted of this initiative at the TAT website: "[This] core program...drives the biggest impact by training hundreds of thousands of industry me

On this edition of ST, we're talking about the nonprofit collective known as ImpactTulsa, which began in 2014, and which (per its website) aims to "improve education for every child. Our partnership includes [several dozens of] leaders from education, business, philanthropic, nonprofit, civic, and faith communities who all believe education is the key to the prosperity of our community." Our guest is Kathy Seibold, the executive director of ImpactTulsa, who tells us about her organzation's recently released Community Impact Report for 2016.

Our guest on this edition of ST is Aravind Adiga, who won the Booker Prize for his novel, "The White Tiger." He joins us to discuss his newest book, just out, which is called "Selection Day." As was noted by The New York Times of this fine coming-of-age saga that focuses on two brothers in a Mumbai slum who are raised to become cricket stars: "Mr. Adiga's third novel supplies further proof that his Booker Prize...was no fluke. He is not merely a confident storyteller but also a thinker, a skeptic, a wily entertainer, a thorn in the side of orthodoxy and cant....

On this edition of our show, we welcome Dr. Roger Horowitz, author of "Kosher USA: How Coke Bacame Kosher and Other Tales of Modern Food." Dr. Horowitz will offer a free-to-the-public presentation about this book tomorrow night, Thursday the 2nd, at 7pm here in Tulsa. The event happens at Congregation B'nai Emunah, at 1719 South Owasso.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Lydia Reeder, a writer and editor based in Denver. She tells us about her now book, a popular history entitled "Dust Bowl Girls: The Inspiring Story of the Team That Barnstormed Its Way to Basketball Glory." It's the surprising but true Depression-era story of a women's basketball team -- the Oklahoma Presbyterian College Cardinals -- who came from Durant, and who were pretty much the best of the best in the early 1930s. The leader of this inspiring team, the visionary coach Sam Babb, is also profiled in Reeder's book -- and, indeed, Ms.

On this installment of ST Medical Monday, our guest is Jessica Nutik Zitter, who practices the atypical combination of ICU and palliative care medicine at a hospital in Oakland, California. She's also the author of a remarkable new book, "Extreme Measures: Finding a Better Path to the End of Life." As was noted of this memoir/critique/meditation by Kirkus Reviews: "End-stage patient suffering and distress inspire an early-career watershed moment for a sympathetic physician.

Earlier this week, on Tuesday the 21st, the State Board of Equalization met in Oklahoma City to approve revised revenue estimates for FY 2017 and FY 2018. The revised estimates for FY 2017 are for revenues to be "under" by some $296 million, or 5.7 percent, and thus a revenue failure has been declared. This is the third time since 2000 that there have been revenue failures for the state budget in two consecutive years; it also happened in 2002-03 and 2009-10. How did the State of Oklahoma (once again) get here? And does the budget outlook for next year look any better?

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we're discussing the Oscar-nominated documentary feature, "I Am Not Your Negro," which opens locally tomorrow (Friday the 24th) at the Circle Cinema. Indeed, our two guests today -- Hannibal Johnson (a Tulsa-based author and attorney) and Bob Jackson (an Associate Professor of English here at the University of Tulsa) -- will both be speaking about this film, and co-leading an audience-wide discussion about it, tomorrow night at the Circle.

On this edition of ST, our guest is psychologist and author Kenneth E. Miller, who has been working with war-affected communities since 1991 as a researcher, clinician, organizational consultant, and filmmaker. He joins us to discuss his book, "War Torn: Stories of Courage, Love, and Resilience." With 200 million people affected by armed conflict or genocide worldwide, refugees are appearing in record numbers; indeed, not since World War II have so many war-affected migrants been relocating around the globe.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Ted Piccone, a senior fellow in the Project on International Order and Strategy as well as the Latin America Initiative at the Brookings Institution. His research is focused on global democracy and human rights policies, and he spoke recently at the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations. Piccone is the author of "Five Rising Democracies and the Fate of the International Liberal Order," and his talk here in Tulsa was basically an extension of this book.

Our guest on this edition of ST Medical Monday is Sharon Begley, the senior science writer at STAT, which is the life sciences publication of The Boston Globe.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we welcome Giles Milton back to our show; he's a British historian and author whose many books include "Nathaniel's Nutmeg" and "When Hitler Took Cocaine and Lenin Lost His Brain." He joins us to discuss his latest book, which is called "Churchill's Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare: The Mavericks Who Plotted Hitler's Defeat." As was noted of this exciting work of history by Kirkus Reviews: "[This is] an elegant presentation of Winston Churchill’s special guerrilla operations force, which consistently met the dirty exigencies of war....

On this edition of our show, a discussion with Sue Klebold, whose 17-year-old son, Dylan, was of course one of the two teenage boys who committed suicide ­after their murderous attack on Colorado's Columbine High School in 1999. Klebold has a new book out about this incident -- and more to the point, about the behaviors that she did and did not see in her son in the months and years leading up to that terrible April day.

On this edition of our show, we chat with Dr. Ronald Epstein about his new book, "Attending: Medicine, Mindfulness, and Humanity." As was noted of this reflective and quite timely medical memoir by Kirkus Reviews: "Can the encounter between doctor and patient be improved? A renowned family physician thinks so, and he explains how in this compendium of a lifetime of experience.

As part of its current 60th season, Tulsa Ballet is offering the world premiere of a special, newly-commissioned work -- a $1-million production entitled "Dorothy and the Prince of Oz." This full-length ballet will run throughout the weekend (Feb. 10th  through the 12th) at the Tulsa PAC, and we learn all about it on this edition of StudioTulsa. Our guest is Edwaard Liang, the Artistic Director for BalletMet in Columbus, Ohio; he was the choreographer for Tulsa Ballet's acclaimed "Romeo and Juliet" a few years ago, and he's also the choreographer for this exciting new work.

On this edition of ST, we welcome two curators from the Philbrook Museum of Art to our show. Catherine Whitney and Sarah Lees tell us about "Lusha Nelson Photographs: Celebrity, the Forgotten Man, and 1930s America," which will be on view through May 7th of this year.

Turkey has been a vital U.S. ally for many years, but is that going to change in the Age of Trump? And for that matter, what do -- or don't -- Presidents Trump and Erdogan have in common? On this edition of ST, we speak with Mahir Zeynalov, a noted Turkish journalist, media analyst, and press-freedom advocate. Zeynalov is now based in Washington, DC, as he was deported from his homeland in 2014 by the Turkish Interior Ministry; he is well-known for his writing, which appears in Al Arabiya, The Huffington Post, and other publications.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, an interesting chat with Basil Twist, the New York City-based puppeteer who was a MacArthur genius grant recipient in 2015. He has been universally acclaimed for his puppet-related design, construction, choreography, staging, and other work on productions such as "Symphonie Fantastique," "Dogugaeshi," "Red Beads", "Petrushka," "Hansel and Gretel," "Master Peter's Puppet Show," and so on.

We are joined on this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday by Dr. Danielle Ofri, an associate professor of medicine at the New York University School of Medicine who has cared for patients at Bellevue Hospital for more than two decades. Her previous book was "What Doctors Feel: How Emotions Affect the Practice of Medicine," and she joins us to discuss her new book, which follows up on that one.

Our guest is Edward Baptist, a professor at Cornell University, who will soon give the 2017 Cadenhead-Settle Memorial Lecture here at TU. (This free-to-the-public event happens on Monday the 6th, beginning at 7pm; you'll find more information here.) Prof.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we speak with Bart Ehrman, the Distinguished Professor of Religious Studies at UNC Chapel Hill. Prof.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we welcome Tulsa Mayor G.T. Bynum back to our studios. He was sworn in as Tulsa's newest mayor in December, having previously served as a member of the Tulsa City Council since 2008. (Mayor Bynum's great-great grandfather [1899-1900] and maternal grandfather [1970-1978] also served as mayors of Tulsa.) The Mayor joins us to talk about what he's accomplished in his mayoral tenure thus far as well as what he has planned for the immediate future.

Our guest is Helen Czerski, who is a physicist at University College London's Department of Mechanical Engineering as well as science presenter for the BBC. She chats with us about her new book, "Storm in a Teacup: The Physics of Everyday Life." As was noted of this book in a starred review in Publishers Weekly: "In this delightful pop science title, Czerski, a physicist at University College London, shows that understanding how the universe works requires little more than paying attention to patterns and figuring out increasingly refined ways to explain them.

On this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, our guest is Dr. Rachel Carlton Abrams, who has been a board member of the American Holistic Medical Association since 2013. Dr.

"The Big Trail" -- a classic Western from 1930, and the first film in which John Wayne had a starring role -- was chosen in 2006 by the Library of Congress to be a part of the National Film Registry. And it was shot in a wide-screen format (rare for that time) by the legendary Hollywood director, Raoul Walsh. Just recently, it was announced that someone has donated to Gilcrease Museum a set of rare stereoscopic photographs that were taken on the set of this motion picture, which was actually filmed all over the West, from New Mexico to Utah to California.

Our guest today is Ken Busby, the CEO and executive director of the non-profit Route 66 Alliance, which is based here in Tulsa, and which is, per its website, "dedicated to the preservation, promotion, and enhancement of historic Route 66 -- past, present, and future." Formerly the director of the Arts and Humanities Council of Tulsa, Busby was asked to lead the "Mother Road"-focused organization in 2014; today, he brings us up to speed on the Route 66 Experience Museum, a large-scale development for which funds are still being raised and plans

"Come along now, Watson! The game is afoot!" On this edition of StudioTulsa, we're discussing none other than Sherlock Holmes with the writer and editor Michael Sims, who is the author of (among other books) "The Story of Charlotte's Web," which both The Washington Post and The Boston Globe chose as a Best Book of the Year.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Randall Fuller, the Chapman Professor of English here at TU. He joins us to discuss his new book, "The Book That Changed America: How Darwin's Theory of Evolution Ignited a Nation." As the historian Eric Foner recently wrote of this book in The New York Times: "Fuller...is [previously] the author of a prize-winning study of the Civil War's impact on American literature.

On this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, we speak with author Adam Tanner, who is a writer in residence at Harvard University's Institute for Quantitative Social Science. Tanner joins us to discuss his new book, "Our Bodies, Our Data: How Companies Make Billions Selling Our Medical Records." As was noted of this volume by Kirkus Reviews: "[This is] a disturbing look at the threat to privacy created by the lucrative and growing health care data-mining industry.

Pages