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Weekdays 5am to 9am
Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep

Each morning NPR's Morning Edition takes listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentary that inform, challenge, and occasionally amuse. Morning Editions is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C. and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and report first hand on the day's most important issues and news. While they are out traveling, David Greene can be heard as regular substitute host. For information on a recent story, or the most recent broadcast, click here.

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Election 2012
4:24 am
Tue October 2, 2012

The Politics Of Election Polls

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 12:08 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

President Obama has held a lead over Mitt Romney in the polls for several weeks now, and that's prompted a conservative reaction. Some are charging that big media outlets are intentionally designing their polling to make it look like the president is getting the kind of voter surge he had in 2008. NPR's David Folkenflik has the story.

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NPR Story
4:24 am
Tue October 2, 2012

2013 Car Models

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 12:08 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

'Tis the season for new car buying. Fall is when automakers roll out their latest models - with new technologies and better fuel efficiency. And to talk about the latest trends, we reached Michelle Krebs in Detroit. She's a senior analyst at the auto information website Edmunds.com.

Good to have you back, Michelle.

MICHELLE KREBS: Glad to be back.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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The Two-Way
2:36 am
Tue October 2, 2012

Brain-Damaged Man Wins New Trial In Two-Decades-Old Killing

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 12:08 pm

Richard Lapointe confessed in 1989 that he stabbed, raped and killed his wife's 88-year-old grandmother two years earlier. But in the 23 years since, experts in criminal justice have come to better understand how sometimes people make false confessions — especially someone with brain damage, like Lapointe. On Monday, Connecticut's state Appellate Court ordered a new trial, saying prosecutors wrongly withheld potentially important evidence.

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It's All Politics
2:35 am
Tue October 2, 2012

In North Carolina, Latino Voters Could Be Crucial To Winning The State

A sign directs voters to polls at a polling station on Nov. 4, 2008, in Shallotte, N.C.
Logan Mock-Bunting Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 12:24 pm

In this year's presidential campaign, $11 million has been spent so far on ads targeting Hispanics, according to ad-tracking firm Kantar Media/CMAG.

That's eight times the amount spent four years ago on Spanish-language ads, and it's focused in just a handful of battleground states: Florida, Nevada, Colorado and, perhaps most surprisingly, North Carolina.

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It's All Politics
2:33 am
Tue October 2, 2012

Colorado's Undecided Voters Are A Hot Election Commodity

A rare thunderstorm produced hail, torrential rain and a double rainbow in downtown Fort Collins, Colo., last month.
Becky Lettenberger NPR

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 12:08 pm

Throughout the series First and Main this election season, Morning Edition is traveling to contested counties in swing states to find out what is shaping voters' decisions.

The series started in Florida and the hotly contested county that includes Tampa, then continued to a county in Wisconsin that voted twice for George W. Bush and then swung to Barack Obama.

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Shots - Health Blog
2:31 am
Tue October 2, 2012

Will Low-Cost Genome Sequencing Open 'Pandora's Box'?

The Proton Semiconductor Sequencer from Ion Torrent Systems Inc. is a new DNA sequencing machine designed to sequence the entire human genome in about eight hours for $1,000.
Ethan Miller Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 26, 2012 9:54 am

Beau Gunderson's fascinated by what he might learn from his DNA.

"I'm curious about what makes me tick, essentially," says Gunderson, 29, who writes code for a Silicon Valley startup.

So Gunderson has signed up for every genetic test he's been able to afford. And he can't wait for the price of getting his entire genetic code — his genome — to drop to about $1,000, as many are predicting is imminent.

"Yeah, if the price does drop — to a thousand bucks for example — I might pay that. That's a good personal price point for me," Gunderson said.

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Books
2:21 am
Tue October 2, 2012

Boozy Birth Of The American Mafia In Lehane's Latest

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 12:08 pm

Here's how the new novel from crime writer Dennis Lehane begins: "Some years later, on a tugboat in the Gulf of Mexico, Joe Coughlin's feet were placed in a tub of cement."

Pretty hard to stop reading after an opening line like that — at least you'd think. "It was funny, a guy came up to me the other night, and he said, 'I really loved this book once it got going,' " Lehane tells NPR's Steve Inskeep. "I thought, 'Jesus Christ, read the first sentence! How much more "getting going" is it going to get?' "

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Latin America
2:20 am
Tue October 2, 2012

Uruguay's Drugs Policy: Regulating Market For Pot

Supporters of legalization of cannabis in Montevideo march toward the Legislative Palace in May as part of the 2012 Global Marijuana March.
Miguel Rojo AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 7:16 pm

Increasing drug use and narcotrafficking has made some Latin American countries among the most violent places on Earth. But tiny, progressive Uruguay, where it's always been legal to use marijuana, is leading the way with an alternative drug policy.

The government of President Jose Mujica has proposed a law that would put the state in charge of producing and selling marijuana to registered users.

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NPR Story
9:15 am
Mon October 1, 2012

Watch This: Native American Author Sherman Alexie

Author and Spokane Indian Sherman Alexie won the American Book Award in 1996 for Reservation Blues.
Seth Wenig AP

Originally published on Mon October 8, 2012 3:35 am

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Around the Nation
6:35 am
Mon October 1, 2012

Jack White Disappointed In Fans' Energy Level

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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