Music Reviews
2:08 pm
Thu December 29, 2011

This One's For Guy Clark, Americana's Craftsman

Originally published on Thu December 29, 2011 4:21 pm

Singer-songwriter Guy Clark is a key figure in alternative country music. In the 1970s, his Nashville home was an axis of creativity, a hangout where musicians assembled to trade songs and stories, and where Clark mentored young songwriters at the time, like Steve Earle and Rodney Crowell. Clark turned 70 this year, and dozens of his friends and admirers are now saying "Thanks" on a double album called This One's for Him: A Tribute to Guy Clark.

Clark is Americana's craftsman, a storyteller who carves songs out of quiet moments and marginal characters that most folks wouldn't notice, and one whose simple rhymes convey complicated lives. Raised in West Texas, Clark soaked up blues, folk and Mexican music, along with a wonderfully skewed view of the human condition. He finds beauty in imperfection, though Lyle Lovett's cover of "Anyhow I Love You" is about as perfect as it gets.

The key to producing a great tribute album lies in assigning the songs to the singers, and the ones here are well-matched. Most of the artists hit the precarious balance between honoring the original work and making it their own. It all sounds as natural as the pickin' parties at Clark's house in the 1970s, from the iconic Willie Nelson — who riffs on Clark's timeless "Desperadoes Waiting for a Train" — to next-generation outlaw Hayes Carll, whose offbeat sensibility suits "Worry B Gone."

This double-disc set leans on languid tempos and omits a good deal of the success that Clark enjoyed when mainstream country acts took his songs to the top of the charts. But Clark fans will appreciate the circle drawn by this tribute, from Radney Foster's excellent reading of "L.A. Freeway" (a Clark classic made popular by Jerry Jeff Walker) to a new song that Clark wrote during the making of this tribute called "My Favorite Picture of You," which he asked Walker to sing.

Clark has received a lifetime's worth of honors and awards for filling his songs with vivid character sketches, eerie fatalism and love that never dies. But his dark humor is rarely far from the surface. It's one of the keys to his endurance as a songwriter and performer, and no doubt one of the central reasons he's so beloved by the impressive group of artists on this collection.

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Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Singer-songwriter Guy Clark is a key figure in alternative country music. In the 1970s, his Nashville home was a center of creativity, where musicians gathered to trade songs and stories. Clark turned 70 this year, and dozens of his friends and admirers are now saying thanks on a double CD, called "This One's for Him: A Tribute to Guy Clark."

Critic Meredith Ochs has our review.

MEREDITH OCHS, BYLINE: Guy Clark is Americana's craftsman, a storyteller who carves songs out of quiet moments and marginal characters whose simple rhymes convey complicated lives. Raised in West Texas, he soaked up blues, folk and Mexican music along with a wonderfully skewed view of the human condition. Clark finds beauty in imperfection, though Lyle Lovett's cover of this song is about as perfect as it gets.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "ANYHOW I LOVE YOU")

LYLE LOVETT: (Singing) Just you wait until tomorrow when you wake up with me at your side and find I haven't lied about nothing. And I wouldn't trade a tree for the way I feel about you. In the morning, anyhow I love you.

OCHS: The key to producing a great tribute album lies in assigning the songs to the singers, and the ones here are well-matched. Most of the artists hit the precarious balance between honoring the original work, and making it their own. It all sounds as natural as the picking parties at Guy Clark's house in the 1970s - from the iconic Willie Nelson, who riffs on Clark's timeless "Desperadoes Waiting for a Train," to next-generation outlaw Hayes Carll, whose offbeat sensibility suits this song:

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "WORRY B GONE")

HAYES CARLL: (Singing) Can't listen to the radio, and I hate TV. But there's trouble at the air, trouble with the water. People ain't treating one another like they ought to. Give me just one more puff of that worry be gone.

OCHS: This double disc leans on languid tempos, and omits a good deal of the success that Guy Clark enjoyed when mainstream country acts took his songs to the top of the charts. But Clark fans will appreciate the circle drawn by this tribute, from Radney Foster's excellent reading of "L.A. Freeway," a Clark classic made popular by Jerry Jeff Walker; to a brand-new song that Clark wrote during the making of this tribute, which he asked Walker to sing.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "MY FAVORITE PICTURE OF YOU")

JERRY JEFF WALKER: (Singing) My favorite picture of you is bent and is faded, and it's pinned to my wall. You were so angry then, it's hard to believe we were lovers at all. There's a fire in your eyes, your heart's on your sleeve, a curse on your lips. But all I can see is beautiful.

OCHS: Guy Clark has received a lifetime's worth of honors and awards for filling his songs with vivid character sketches, eerie fatalism, and love that never dies. But his dark humor is rarely far from the surface. It's one of the keys to his endurance as a songwriter and performer, and no doubt one of the central reasons he's so beloved by the impressive group of artists on this tribute.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "HOMEGROWN TOMATOES")

RAY WYLIE HUBBARD: (Singing) Ain't nothing in the world that I like better than bacon and lettuce and homegrown tomatoes. Up in the morning, out in the garden, get you a ripe one, don't get a hard one.

SIEGEL: The double CD is called "This One's for Him: A Tribute to Guy Clark. Our reviewer, Meredith Ochs, is a D.J. and talk show host for SiriusXM Radio.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "HOMEGROWN TOMATOES")

HUBBARD: (Singing) I forget about all the sweating and the digging, and every time I go out and pick me a big one. Homegrown tomatoes, homegrown tomatoes...

SIEGEL: This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.