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The Two-Way
5:14 pm
Fri October 28, 2011

'This Is Just Wrong': Weekend Snowstorm Takes Aim For Northeast

Originally published on Fri October 28, 2011 5:39 pm

Yes, it's still October, but the Northeast could be in for quite a snowstorm this weekend. It'll be a "quick, one-day event," says the Weather Channel, but it could dump up to 15 inches in Harrisburg, Pa.; 10 inches in Hartford, Conn.; 12 inches in Concord, N.H.

The Weather Channel adds:

While the heaviest amounts are most likely to fall northwest of I-95, some accumulations are also possible closer to the coast along the heavily-populated I-95 corridor from near Washington, D.C. to Boston. Precipitation will start as rain in these locations, but may change over to snow. How quickly this occurs and how much snow falls is dependent on the availability of enough cold air, which is difficult to forecast early in the season.

We don't know about you, but we tend to agree with what one woman from Connecticut told MSNBC:

"This is just wrong," said Dee Lund of East Hampton, Conn., who was getting four new tires put on her car before a weekend road trip to New Hampshire.

October snowfall records could be broken in parts of southern New England, especially at higher elevations. The October record for southern New England is 7.5 inches in Worcester, Conn., in 1979.

Accuweather.com is suggesting that those in the path of the storm should get ready for some power outages. The snow, they report, will be heavy and wet:

This weekend's "crushing", early-season snowstorm threatens to create massive power outages from Pennsylvania, New Jersey and New York into New England.

The snow will be extremely heavy and wet in nature, and unfortunately, most of the trees in the Northeast are still full of leaves. As evidenced by the snowstorm that cut power to more than 100,000 people in Denver earlier this week, this combination spells a nightmare for residents.

The National Weather Service has issued winter storm warnings up and down the East Coast.

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