Local & Regional
2:37 pm
Wed October 19, 2011

$162 Million Loss for American Airlines

Fort Worth, TX – AMR Corporation, the parent company of American Airlines, Inc., today reported a net loss of $162 million, or $0.48 per diluted share, for the third quarter of 2011, compared to a net profit of $143 million, or $0.39 per diluted share, for the same period of 2010.

These results reflect the adverse impact of quarter-end volatility in WTI crude oil prices and foreign exchange rates. WTI prices decreased, while jet fuel prices remained high, which resulted in a non-cash item relating to fuel hedging ineffectiveness being recorded in fuel expense. In addition, foreign exchange rates were volatile and the U.S. dollar strengthened during the period, and as a result of revaluing foreign assets, the Company incurred a foreign exchange loss. Altogether, these items, which the Company described on Oct. 10, increased AMR's net loss by approximately $50 million or 15 cents per share.

In the third quarter, the Company's overall performance was negatively impacted by fuel prices, which increased 41 percent compared to the prior year period. Taking into account the impact of fuel hedging, AMR paid on average $3.15 per gallon for jet fuel in the quarter versus $2.24 per gallon in the third quarter of 2010. As a result, the Company paid $653 million more for fuel in the third quarter of 2011 than it would have paid at prevailing prices from the corresponding prior-year period.

"While the third quarter was challenging for American Airlines, we are taking aggressive actions to improve the Company's performance and strengthen its foundation for long-term success," said AMR Chairman and CEO Gerard Arpey. "We have put in place many of the critical building blocks for a successful future, including a strong network and alliance partnerships, accelerated fleet renewal plans and innovative products and services to enhance our customers' experience. At this point, our immediate top priority is to address the key remaining foundational issue, which is our cost structure, so that we can change the competitive dynamics and move our company forward on the path to profitability."

Arpey also highlighted several recent actions American has taken to address its near-term performance and strengthen the foundation for its success over the long term: