Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

Editor's note: This post contains graphic descriptions that some may find disturbing.

Updated at 3:50 a.m. ET

The Associated Press on Wednesday published a report detailing the existence of several previously undisclosed mass graves of Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar along with shocking details of the systematic execution of victims and attempts to hide evidence of the crime.

The head of Russia's foreign spy service reportedly traveled to the U.S. earlier this month and met with top Trump administration intelligence officials, despite being on a U.S. sanctions blacklist.

In a tweet, Russia's embassy in Washington acknowledged the visit, citing the official ITAR-Tass news agency: "Sergey Naryshkin has visited the United States for consultations with #US counterparts on the struggle against terrorism ..."

The decision by Bill Nye to attend the State of the Union Address alongside the Trump administration's nominee to head NASA has put the celebrity science educator at odds with many scientists.

Nye, who starred in the children's program Bill Nye the Science Guy and now has his own Netflix original series, Bill Nye Saves the World is also CEO of the Planetary Society.

Updated at 6:10 a.m. ET

President Trump on Tuesday signed an executive order to keep open the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay, after pledging during the campaign to "load it up with some bad dudes."

NASA's IMAGE spacecraft spent five years studying the Earth's magnetosphere, but when its signal blinked off in 2005, the space agency called it a mission and moved on.

Twelve years later, enter amateur astronomer Scott Tilley.

Updated at 11:45 a.m. ET

Police in Kenya fired teargas on Tuesday, in an effort to break up what authorities called an illegal mass gathering of opposition supporters who staged a swearing-in of their leader as the country's president.

The government subsequently declared the resistance movement "an organized criminal group." The declaration cited Kenya's Prevention of Organized Crimes Act of 2010.

Editor's note: This report contains graphic descriptions that some may find disturbing.

Police in Canada say they are undertaking the grim task of searching backyards, flowerbeds and planters for human remains after a Toronto gardener was charged with killing at least five men and dismembering their bodies.

However, authorities suspect Bruce McArthur — who was arrested on Jan. 18 and initially charged with two counts of first-degree murder — has killed more than just the five people reflected in the charges announced Monday.

CIA Director Mike Pompeo says he has "every expectation" that Russia will try to disrupt midterm elections in November after U.S. intelligence uncovered interference in 2016.

In an interview with the BBC, the head of the Central Intelligence Agency was asked about concerns that the Kremlin might try again to influence the outcome of upcoming U.S. polls. He said: "I haven't seen a significant decrease in their activity."

The U.S. State Department is calling out Moscow after what it describes as a dangerously close pass by a Russian fighter jet near a U.S. Navy reconnaissance plane over the Black Sea.

"As confirmed by U.S. Naval Forces Europe, a Russian [Su-27] engaged in an unsafe interaction with a U.S. EP-3 in international airspace, with the Russia pilot closing to within 5 feet and crossing directly in front of the EP-3's flight path," State Department spokesperson Heather Nauert said in a statement Monday.

At least seven survivors from a ferry that sank more than a week ago near the Pacific island-nation of Kirabati have been rescued from a small dinghy.

New Zealand's military found the survivors aboard a wooden dinghy after the 56-foot catamaran ferry MV Butiraoi went missing. The vessel was originally thought to be carrying 50 passengers and crew; however, Kirabati President Taneti Mamau later said that up to 100 people may have been aboard.

Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny was briefly detained Sunday after a scuffle with police, who seized him amid protests in various cities calling for a boycott of the March 18 presidential election.

Navalny — a prominent Putin critic and anti-corruption campaigner who leads the country's Progressive Party and has been disqualified from running for president — was wrestled to the ground by police near a demonstration at Moscow's Pushkin Square.

Lewis D'Vorkin, the embattled editor in chief of The Los Angeles Times, is being replaced by veteran Chicago journalist Jim Kirk in a dramatic shakeup at the newspaper that follows weeks of tumult in the newsroom.

The newspaper's parent, Chicago-based Tronc, confirmed the move late Sunday. Kirk, 52, who joined Tronc in August, is a former editor and publisher of The Chicago Sun-Times who briefly served as interim editor at the Times ahead of D'Vorkin's appointment less than five months ago.

Updated at 5:20 a.m. ET

Gunmen attacked an Army Garrison situated near a military academy in the Afghan capital Monday, killing at least five people -– the latest in a series of assaults that have rattled the country in recent weeks.

Jennifer Glasse, reporting for NPR from Kabul, says five heavily armed assailants stormed the police guard outside the Marshal Fahim academy Monday and that Afghan soldiers battled the attackers for several hours.

She says two of the militants detonated suicide vests, two were shot and one was captured.

Grumpy Cat finally has something to smile about.

The perpetually scowling kitty, whose real name is Tardar Sauce, has been awarded a cool $710,000 in a copyright infringement case. Or at least her human, Tabatha Bundesen, has.

President Trump, speaking to Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Wednesday, urged Ankara to scale back its military operations in neighboring Syria following an offensive launched by Turkish forces against U.S.-backed Kurdish insurgents in Syria's Afrin region.

At least that is how the conversation about the Turkish operation, known as "Operation Olive Branch," is being reported by the White House.

Shops were ransacked and vehicles torched in parts of India on Thursday as activists from Hindu nationalist groups showed their anger over the release of a controversial film about a 14th Century Muslim emperor and a Hindu queen.

Twelve members of the North Korean women's ice hockey team have crossed the heavily fortified border to begin training with their South Korean counterparts ahead of next month's Olympics in Pyeongchang.

Wearing red, white and blue team parkas emblazoned with the North Korean flag and "DPR Korea" on their backs, the women arrived on Thursday after the rival countries agreed to field a joint team at the games for the first time ever.

Sen. Tammy Duckworth is no stranger to firsts: She is already the first Asian American woman to be elected to Congress from her home state of Illinois and the first disabled woman to win election from any state.

On Tuesday, she announced that she's pregnant with her second child — and that would make her the first serving U.S. Senator to give birth while in office.

The 49-year-old Democrat became Illinois' junior senator last year, winning the seat after serving two terms in the House.

Updated at 1:05 p.m. ET

Save the Children has temporarily suspended all of its operations in Afghanistan, after gunmen carried out a brutal attack on its provincial office in Jalalabad on Wednesday, killing three staff members in an assault that also included explosives.

Former Vice President Joe Biden says he and President Barack Obama decided not to speak out publicly on Russian interference during the 2016 campaign after Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell refused to sign a bipartisan statement condemning the Kremlin's role.

In a late night tweet Tuesday, President Trump ratcheted up taunts aimed at Democrats over the short-lived government shutdown, reiterating his insistence that there can be no fix on DACA without funding for his border wall.

"Cryin' Chuck Schumer fully understands, especially after his humiliating defeat, that if there is no Wall, there is no DACA," the president tweeted, referring to what he earlier described as how the Democrats "caved" on the shutdown.

South Korea is requiring that anonymous transactions involving cryptocurrencies such as bitcoin be made traceable and that exchanges for digital currencies be subject to a 24.2 percent tax.

South Korea is home to one of the world's largest bitcoin exchanges and is the third-largest market for it, behind Japan and the U.S.

A powerful magnitude 7.9 earthquake struck off the coast of Alaska late Monday night, initially prompting a tsunami warning for a large section of the state's coast and parts of Canada. As more data came in, the U.S. Tsunami Warning System downgraded the threat to an advisory for Alaska's Chignik Bay.

Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rosselló says he is moving to sell off the U.S. territory's public power company, as nearly a third of the island's electric customers remain without power four months after Hurricane Maria struck the island on Sept. 20.

Rosselló said Monday that it might take 18 months to privatize the insolvent Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority, or PREPA, the largest U.S. public utility as measured by the number of customers — 3.3 million.

Updated at 1:27 p.m. ET

The sudden eruption of a volcano overlooking a ski resort in central Japan rained ash on the slopes and may have triggered an avalanche that left at least one person missing and 10 others injured.

Japan's Meteorological Agency reports that Mount Kusatsu-Shirane, located about 120 miles northwest of Tokyo, erupted early Tuesday.

Amazon on Monday will open its automated grocery in Seattle to the public, replacing cashiers with a smartphone app and hundreds of small cameras that track purchases.

For the past year, the 1,800-square foot mini-mart has been open to the company's employees.

There is no waiting in line for check out at Amazon Go, as the store is called — instead, its computerized system charges customers' Amazon account as they exit the store.

Prison guards in France are protesting at many of the country's 188 prisons to acknowledge what they say is the government's indifference to attacks against them.

At the prison in the southern city of Marseille, about 100 guards protested, setting a small fire and blocking the entrance, according to The Associated Press.

The Local reports that 120 prisons nationwide have been similarly blockaded by striking guards.

Police in New Delhi say they have captured a man who came to be known as "India's Bin Laden" for allegedly masterminding a series of deadly bombings across India over the past decade.

Indian authorities say that Abdul Subhan Qureshi planned bomb blasts that ripped through the western state of Gujarat in 2008, killing 56 people. He is also believed to have founded the militant group Indian Mujahideen and to have been behind deadly bombings in Mumbai in 2006, Delhi in 2010 and Bangalore in 2014.

It is a sign of the times: Tokyo has conducted its first public drill to prepare for the possibility of a missile attack from North Korea.

At the Tokyo Dome amusement park, rides came to a halt as the public address system blared an ominous warning: "An advisory about a missile launch was just issued. Everyone, please stay calm and seek shelter in the basement. Those who are already indoors, please stay there."

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