Rich Fisher

General Manager & host of StudioTulsa

Rich Fisher passed through KWGS about thirty years ago, and just never left. Today, he is the general manager of Public Radio Tulsa, and the host of KWGS’s public affairs program, StudioTulsa, which will celebrate its twentieth anniversary in August 2012 . As host of StudioTulsa, Rich has conducted roughly four thousand long-form interviews with local, national, and international figures in the arts, humanities, sciences, and government.  Very few interviews have gone smoothly. Despite this, he has been honored for his work by several organizations including the Governor's Arts Award for Media by the State Arts Council, a Harwelden Award from the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa, and was named one of the “99 Great Things About Oklahoma” in 2000 by Oklahoma Today magazine.  

In addition, Rich is an active musician. He’s currently the principal trombonist of the Signature Symphony at TCC, leads the Starlight Jazz Orchestra, and is a free-lance musician whose work ranges from the pit of touring Broadway musicals, to the salsa band, Grupo Salsabor.

Ways to Connect

On this edition of our show, we speak with the artist Joseph Velasquez, who has an MA and an MFA from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, is the co-founder of the Dirty Printmakers of America, is a curator at the SlingShot Gallery (in Madison, WI), and is one of the creators/participants/educators behind Drive-By Press (which, per its website, is on a "mission to share [its] enthusiasm for printmaking with audiences everywhere.") Now based in Austin, Texas, Velasquez tells us that he began Drive-By Press in order to give demonstrations --- from the back of his truck --- of relief printing,

On this edition of our show, we speak by phone with the journalist Matti Friedman, a correspondent for the Associated Press who grew up in Toronto and now lives in Jerusalem. Friedman's new book --- a highly engaging hybrid of history, mystery, biblical scholarship, and good old suspense-driven storytelling --- is called "The Aleppo Codex: A True Story of Obsession, Faith, and the Pursuit of an Ancient Bible." As has been written of Friedman's book in a starred review in Booklist: "Written in the tenth century, the Aleppo Codex is the most accurate copy of the Hebrew Bible.

On this edition of our show, we discuss a newly created, two-generation program to move parents and their children beyond poverty: the Community Action Project of Tulsa's CareerAdvance initiative. Our guest is Anne Mosle, a Vice President at the Aspen Institute and the Executive Director of the its Ascend Program, which focuses on economic security for families. Mosle recently visited Tulsa in order to observe the CareerAdvance program (which has been funded by the George Kaiser Family Foundation, the Inasmuch Foundation, and the Health Profession Opportunities Grant) firsthand.

Our guest is Dr. Ricki Lewis, a geneticist, journalist, professor, and genetic counselor. She's also the author of one of the most widely used college textbooks about genetics --- "Human Genetics: Concepts and Applications" (now in its tenth edition) --- and her latest book, just out from St. Martin's Press, is "The Forever Fix: Gene Therapy and the Boy Who Saved It." Dr. Lewis will be a featured speaker later this week at the Human Anatomy and Physiology Society's Annual Conference, which has been happening here in Tulsa since Saturday the 26th.

On this edition of ST, which originally aired last fall, we welcome back Steven Johnson, the bestselling and award-winning author of several books on science and technology.

We're listening back, on this edition of our program, to a conversation we had in late November of last year with the widely celebrated novelist, Alan Furst. At that time, Furst was just about to appear in Tulsa to receive the Tulsa Library Trust's 2011 Peggy Helmerich Award.

What do we mean when we call someone an "amateur"? What are we saying? As it happens, there are many answers to this question. On this edition of ST, we speak with Jack Hitt, a contributing editor to The New York Times Magazine, Harper’s, and public radio’s This American Life.

On this edition of ST, a discussion of the neurobiology of pleasure --- and of how pleasures can turn into addictions. We chat by phone with David J. Linden, who is a Professor in the Department of Neuroscience at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine as well as the Chief Editor of the Journal of Neurophysiology.

Our guest on this edition of StudioTulsa is the New Mexico-based photographer Gus Foster, who's been capturing images with various panoramic cameras since the early 1970s. There's a new exhibit at Tulsa's Gilcrease Museum --- on view through October 7th of this year --- called "Panoramic Landscapes of the American West: Gus Foster's Views of this Broad Land." It's a collection a 20+ works that are as spectacular and sweeping as they are carefully executed and richly diverse: a series of color photographs of our western States that are 8, 10, or 12 feet in length.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, our guest is the Washington-based attorney Reid Chambers, who was formerly (during the Nixon and Ford administrations) Associate Solicitor for the Bureau of Indian Affairs at the U.S. Department of the Interior. Chambers will be the moderator for a free-to-the-public forum entitled "Renunciation of Termination, Self-Determination, and the Trust Relationship," which is being jointly presented by the Gilcrease Museum, the University of Tulsa, the National Archives, and the Richard Nixon Foundation.

Today and tomorrow (May 18th and 19th), the University of Tulsa and Gilcrease Museum will host a two-day symposium to announce the now-being-planned Helmerich Center for American Research, a new scholarly resource to be constructed on the grounds of the museum. The symposium is entitled "Material Memory" (and you can learn all about it at this link). Our guest on this edition of StudioTulsa is the award-winning Civil War historian, David W.

On this edition of ST, we welcome Amy Wells, a Hollywood-based set decorator who's worked on several outstanding films and TV series over the years, among them the television programs "House," "Love Field," and "Mad Men," as well as the motion pictures "Clueless," "There Will Be Blood," and "A Single Man." Wells will speak this evening (Thursday the 17th) at 7pm at the Philbrook Museum of Art; her appearance is a part of the museum's ongoing "Third Thursday" series.

On this edition of our program, a discussion of the personhood movement, the patriarchy movement, the anti-abortion movement, and the points in our American socio-political landscape where all three movements now intersect. We speak by phone with Kathryn Joyce, a freelance journalist whose writing has appeared in The Nation, Mother Jones, The Atlantic, Ms., Slate, Salon, Newsweek, The Daily Beast, The American Prospect, and other publications. Ms.

The crisis in primary care medicine is becoming more evident every day. Long wait times for an appointment, practices closed to new patients, and long waiting room times remind us that primary care physicians are being stretched. Despite record enrollments in American medical schools, however, fewer doctors are choosing primary care as their focus. On this edition of StudioTulsa, Boston General Internist Dr.

In July, Mexican voters will elect a new president. Although it's not getting much coverage here in the States --- where we, of course, have our own upcoming nationwide election to fixate upon --- the electoral race now happening in Mexico is a fiercely contested one. And one key issue in that race is whether the government should continue President Calderon's so-called "war on drugs" --- an issue that could have profound consequences for the U.S. On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Dr. Richard L.

On this edition of ST, guest host Scott Gregory speaks with the widely acclaimed American poet, John Brehm, who grew up in Nebraska, lived for many years in New York City (and then Colorado), and is now based in Portland, Oregon. Brehm has just published his second book of poems, "Help Is On the Way," which won the 2012 Four Lakes Prize in Poetry; his first poetry collection, "Sea of Faith," won the 2004 Brittingham Prize in Poetry.

On today's program, we speak by phone with Dr. Fitzhugh Mullan, Professor of Medicine and Health Policy at The George Washington University. Dr. Mullan is one of the co-chairs for a conference called "Beyond Flexner 2012: Social Mission in Medical Education," which will happen next week at the Hyatt Regency Tulsa (at 100 East Second Street), from May 15th through the 17th. The conference is being presented by The W.K.

On today's program, a chat with the bestselling Tulsa-based author and historian, Michael Wallis. Back in January, as part of the long-running Tulsa Town Hall Speaker Series, Wallis addressed a capacity crowd at the Chapman Music Hall in the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. His talk focused on what it means to be an Oklahoman --- on the character, history, lineage, goals, misdeeds, and accomplishments of the people of the Sooner State. It was a speech that drew much applause, rave reviews, and numerous tributes in the weeks that followed its delivery.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Dr. Nancy Rappaport, a noted child psychiatrist and author. Dr. Rappaport, an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, is the co-author of a new book called, "The Behavior Code: A Practical Guide to Understanding and Teaching the Most Challenging Students" (Harvard Education Press). This book --- written with Jessica Minahan, a behavioral analyst --- is based on an academic collaboration dating back nearly a decade, and is aimed mainly at K-through-6th-Grade educators but will have much to offer parents, as well.

On our show today, we present a conversation with the Tulsa-based writer and curator Diana C. du Pont, who has recently published a book called "You Can't Eat Dirt: Leading America's First All-Women Tribal Council and How We Changed Palm Springs." It's a profile of one Vyola J. Ortner, who led the first-ever all-women tribal council in the United States, and it's co-written with Ortner herself.

On this edition of ST, we welcome the widely accomplished freelance classical conductor Alastair Willis, who will be the Guest Conductor for the Tulsa Symphony when it performs "Musical Fireworks" --- the title for its final concert of the season --- tomorrow night (May 5th) at the Tulsa PAC. The performance begins at 7:30 pm; it will include works by Handel ("Music for the Royal Fireworks"), Haydn ("Concerto for Trumpet"), and Bartok ("Concerto for Orchestra"), with the Haydn selection featuring the symphony's Principal Trumpeter, Tim McFadden.

On today's show, we speak with the gifted Alaskan writer Eowyn Ivey, whose first novel, "The Snow Child" (Reagan Arthur Books), appeared earlier this year to international acclaim. (And yes, in case you're wondering, Eowyn's mother did name her after a character in Tolkien's "Lord of the Rings.") As the following rave review from a critic at Amazon.com has noted: "In her haunting, evocative debut, Eowyn Ivey stakes her claim on a Russian fairy tale, daring the reader --- and the characters --- to be lulled into thinking they know the ending.

On today's show, which originally aired earlier this year, we offer a conversation with Katherine Newman, Dean of the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences and Professor of Sociology at Johns Hopkins University, who's written several books on middle-class economic instability, urban poverty, and the sociology of inequality.

"Homesick and Happy"

May 1, 2012

On today's edition of StudioTulsa, an informed discussion in praise of summer camp. Our guest is Michael Thompson, PhD, a consulting school psychologist and author who's widely known for his bestselling study of contemporary American boys and their emotions, "Raising Cain." Thompson's new book, just out as a Ballantine Trade Paperback Original, is "Homesick and Happy: How Time Away from Parents Can Help a Child Grow." In this work, he offers an engaging and well-researched consideration of both the traditions and advantages of summer camp.

On today's show, we speak with the writer and new-media strategist Mathew Gross, who (along with Mel Gilles) is one of the two authors of a thought-provoking and quite timely non-fiction book called "The Last Myth: What the Rise of Apocalyptic Thinking Tells Us About America." It's an engaging historical study that mainly explores two separate yet related queries: "Why are contemporary Americans so obsessed with the end of the world?" and "What does this obsession actually say about us, as a people?" Did you know, for example, that nearly 60 percent of Americans believe that the events fore

On today's ST, we speak with Christina Burke, Curator of Native American and Non-Western Art at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa. Burke assembled an exhibit which opened at the museum earlier this month, and which is on view through June 3rd, called "Seeking the Sacred: Religious Ritual in Native American Art." It's a show that mainly draws on Philbrook's world-famous collection of 20th-century Native American paintings.

On today's show, we speak with Thomas Skinner, a US Army veteran who's been battling Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (or PTSD) for more than two decades. Over the years, ever since he was honourably discharged from Fort Eustis in Virginia, Skinner has worked as a truck driver, a wildlife photographer, and at a few other jobs.

Today, we welcome back to our program Marcello Angelini, who's been the artistic director at Tulsa Ballet since 1995. As a critic writing for Dance Insider once noted: "To look at what Marcello Angelini has accomplished [since he arrived at] Tulsa Ballet is to see what a community-based arts revolution looks like." The glorious revolution continues with a new production --- the final show of the 2011-2012 season --- called "Off the Floor: Creations in Studio K," which will soon be staged at Tulsa Ballet's Studio K facility in Brookside (at 1212 East 45th Place South).

Last week, the nonprofit John Hope Franklin Center for Reconciliation released a survey of Tulsa residents' views on race relations. This survey was called for, and completed, before the recent (and perhaps racially motivated) shootings in North Tulsa in the pre-dawn hours of Good Friday --- but it's hardly surprising that, given the shocking tragedy of those violent acts and the coincidental appearance of this new survey, people throughout our community are speaking about issues of race with a candor that seems, in many cases, as rare as it is welcome.

On today's show, we present a chat with the charming, delightful, and highly accomplished young concert pianist, Petronel Malan, whose debut CD, "Transfigured Bach: The Complete Bach Transcriptions of Bartok, Lipatti, and Friedman," was nominated for three Grammy Awards in 2004. (She's made three additional CDs of "transfigured" music since then.) Malan will perform as a guest artist with Tulsa Camerata on Thursday night (the 26th) at 7pm in Emerson Hall at All Souls Unitarian Church in Tulsa.

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