Rich Fisher

General Manager & host of StudioTulsa

Rich Fisher passed through KWGS about thirty years ago, and just never left. Today, he is the general manager of Public Radio Tulsa, and the host of KWGS’s public affairs program, StudioTulsa, which will celebrate its twentieth anniversary in August 2012 . As host of StudioTulsa, Rich has conducted roughly four thousand long-form interviews with local, national, and international figures in the arts, humanities, sciences, and government.  Very few interviews have gone smoothly. Despite this, he has been honored for his work by several organizations including the Governor's Arts Award for Media by the State Arts Council, a Harwelden Award from the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa, and was named one of the “99 Great Things About Oklahoma” in 2000 by Oklahoma Today magazine.  

In addition, Rich is an active musician. He’s currently the principal trombonist of the Signature Symphony at TCC, leads the Starlight Jazz Orchestra, and is a free-lance musician whose work ranges from the pit of touring Broadway musicals, to the salsa band, Grupo Salsabor.

Ways to Connect

On this edition of ST, a discussion with the Pulitzer Prize-winning architectural critic Paul Goldberger, a contributing editor at Vanity Fair who spent fifteen years as the architecture writer for The New Yorker and began his career at The New York Times. Goldberger tells us about his new book, a widely praised biography entitled "Building Art: The Life and Work of Frank Gehry." As was noted in the pages of Architectural Digest, Goldberger is "a riveting storyteller and accomplished reporter . . .

In the 1960s, during the tenure of LBJ, a so-called "war on poverty" was decalred in the U.S. Could or should such a "war" be waged again, and if so, how would it fare? On this edition of StudioTulsa, and interesting discussion in that regard with David Grusky, who is the Barbara Kimball Browning Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences at Stanford University. He's also the director of the Center on Poverty and Inequality at Stanford, and he co-edits Pathways Magazine as well as Stanford's Studies in Social Inequality Book Series.

Our guest on today's StudioTulsa is the Oregon-based author Craig Ryan, who tells us about his new book, just out from Liveright: "Sonic Wind: The Story of John Paul Stapp and How a Renegade Doctor Became the Fastest Man on Earth." This biography offers readers, per a starred review in Kirkus, "[the] remarkable, almost-forgotten story of an aerospace pioneer....

On this edition of ST, we learn about a locally based conference on the prevention of child sexual abuse, which is happening today and tomorrow (the 8th and 9th) at the OU-Tulsa Schusterman Center (at 41st and Yale). "Shifting Child Sexual Abuse Paradigms" -- hosted by the nonprofit Empowering Adults-Protecting Children, Inc. -- will bring together a range of experts who work every day in this regard with children and families throughout Oklahoma.

This evening, Wednesday the 7th, the TU College of Law will present the 19th Annual John W. Hager Distinguished Lecture in the John Rogers Hall on the University of Tulsa campus. The lecture is free to the public and begins at 6pm. Our guest on ST is the well-regarded author and journalist who will be giving this lecture: Lincoln Caplan is the Truman Capote Visiting Lecturer in Law at Yale Law School, and his writing about legal matters appears in The New Yorker, The New York Times, U.S. News and World Report, and elsewhere.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we learn about a newly opened exhibit at Gilcrease, "Painted Journeys: The Art of John Mix Stanley," which will be on view through January 3rd. As is noted of this show at the Gilcrease Museum website: "More than 150 years after his Smithsonian gallery burned to the ground, John Mix Stanley is receiving a long overdue retrospective exhibition.

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with Erik Larson, the bestselling nonfiction writer whose page-turning historical narratives include "The Devil in the White City," "In the Garden of Beasts: Love, Terror, and an American Family in Hitler’s Berlin," and (most recently) "Dead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania." This last named book -- exploring the events before, during, and after the 1915 sinking of the ocean liner Lusitania -- is the main thrust of our conversation, although Larson also speaks about how he locates, happens upon, researches, and writes his remarkable stories.

Interested in the idea of living in downtown Tulsa? Curious about all the apartment buildings and office spaces that seem to getting refurbished or constructed downtown these days? Wondering about what might be in store for a certain vacant property or unsightly parking lot within the City of Tulsa's Inner Dispersal Loop? If you've answered in the affirmative to any or all of these queries, you might want to check out the 3rd Annual Dwell in the IDL Tour, which will be presented by the Tulsa Foundation for Architecture this coming Sunday, the 4th, from noon to 5pm.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Norbert Herber, a musician, sound artist, and Department of Telecommunications faculty member at Indiana University, who is presenting an art exhibition soon on the TU campus. This show, called "For the [ ] of the Loop," will be on view at the Hogue Gallery within the TU School of Art from October 2nd through the 29th.

On this installment of ST, we welcome Todd Lasseigne back to our show. He's a nationally recognized horticulturist who is also the president & CEO of the Tulsa Botanic Garden. This weekend, the Garden will celebrate the grand opening of its new A.R. and Marylouise Tandy Floral Terraces -- the big "public unveiling" happens at noon on Saturday, October 3rd.