Rich Fisher

General Manager & host of StudioTulsa

Rich Fisher passed through KWGS about thirty years ago, and just never left. Today, he is the general manager of Public Radio Tulsa, and the host of KWGS’s public affairs program, StudioTulsa, which will celebrate its twentieth anniversary in August 2012 . As host of StudioTulsa, Rich has conducted roughly four thousand long-form interviews with local, national, and international figures in the arts, humanities, sciences, and government.  Very few interviews have gone smoothly. Despite this, he has been honored for his work by several organizations including the Governor's Arts Award for Media by the State Arts Council, a Harwelden Award from the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa, and was named one of the “99 Great Things About Oklahoma” in 2000 by Oklahoma Today magazine.  

In addition, Rich is an active musician. He’s currently the principal trombonist of the Signature Symphony at TCC, leads the Starlight Jazz Orchestra, and is a free-lance musician whose work ranges from the pit of touring Broadway musicals, to the salsa band, Grupo Salsabor.

Ways To Connect

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we're talking about an engaging and multi-faceted little art exhibit on view at TU's Zarrow Center for Art and Education (at 124 East Brady Street, in downtown Tulsa) through June 28th. "The Art of the Book" offers more than 20 works that both explore and encapsulate the book as an art form -- from hand-crafted miniature volumes to book-inspired sculptures to re-purposed "altered book" creations.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Jennifer Latham, a Tulsa-based author whose debut novel is coming out next week: "Scarlett Undercover" is a noir-flavored, modern-day YA mystery with a 16-year-old Muslim American heroine who runs her own detective agency. Book Smart Tulsa will present a free-to-the-public Launch Party for this book next week, on Wednesday the 20th at 7pm, at the University of Tulsa's Zarrow Center for Art and Education in the Brady Arts District (in downtown Tulsa).

On this edition of ST, a discussion of illegal trade on the global scale: from internet-driven piracy to the world's ports and shipping routes, from smuggling and trafficking to peddling counterfeit goods and knock-offs. Our guest is Dr. Suzette Grillot, Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma. She's served in this capacity since 2012, and she is also OU’s Vice Provost for International Programs as well as its William J. Crowe, Jr. Chair in Geopolitics.

Our guest on ST is cultural anthropologist Christina E. Burke, who is the Curator of Native American and Non-Western Art at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa.

On this edition of ST, we offer an interesting interview with John M. Kinder, an assistant professor of American studies and history at Oklahoma State University.

(Please note: This interview first aired back in February.) On this installment of ST, we speak by phone with the author and food-and-health blogger Andie Mitchell about her widely praised new autobiography, "It Was Me All Along." In naming this title a "Best Book of the Month" for January 2015, one critic at Amazon.com gushed: "Andie Mitchell is irresistible. And by that I mean she's irresistible no matter whether she weighs 268 (at the start of this delightful memoir) or 133 (by its end).

John Williams -- the still-active genius who created the music for such classic movies as "Jaws," "Star Wars," "Raiders of the Lost Ark," "Close Encounters of the Third Kind," "E.T.: The Extraterrestrial," and "Schindler's List" (to name just a handful) -- is arguably the greatest composer ever to work in Hollywood. And his memorable, broadly popular music will be the focal point for the final Tulsa Symphony Orchestra concert of this season.

On this installment of ST, we learn about "Red," an award-winning play about the Abstract Expressionist artist Mark Rothko that will soon be presented at the Williams Theater in the Tulsa PAC by the locally-based American Theatre Company. Our guest is Lisa Wilson, who is directing this production.

"God of Carnage," a Tony Award-winning play written about ten years ago by Yasmina Reza -- and translated from French into English by Christopher Hampton -- tells the story of two sets of parents who sit down together after the child of one couple injures the child of the other. The parents have arranged to meet so that they might resolve the matter in a peaceful and diplomatic matter -- yet things quickly (and hilariously) go from bad to worse as the conversation continues, and of course things only get uglier when the rum starts to flow.

On this edition of ST, we listen back to an interview that originally aired in June of last year. At that time, we had an interesting conversation with the British author and scholar Toby Wilkinson, a widely respected scholar of Egyptology.

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