Rich Fisher

General Manager & host of StudioTulsa

Rich Fisher passed through KWGS about thirty years ago, and just never left. Today, he is the general manager of Public Radio Tulsa, and the host of KWGS’s public affairs program, StudioTulsa, which will celebrate its twentieth anniversary in August 2012 . As host of StudioTulsa, Rich has conducted roughly four thousand long-form interviews with local, national, and international figures in the arts, humanities, sciences, and government.  Very few interviews have gone smoothly. Despite this, he has been honored for his work by several organizations including the Governor's Arts Award for Media by the State Arts Council, a Harwelden Award from the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa, and was named one of the “99 Great Things About Oklahoma” in 2000 by Oklahoma Today magazine.  

In addition, Rich is an active musician. He’s currently the principal trombonist of the Signature Symphony at TCC, leads the Starlight Jazz Orchestra, and is a free-lance musician whose work ranges from the pit of touring Broadway musicals, to the salsa band, Grupo Salsabor.

Ways To Connect

(Please note: This show originally aired back in March.) Our guest on ST is Marc Goodman, whose still-in-progress professional career has focused on law enforcement and technology; he's served as everything from a street police officer to a senior adviser to Interpol.

On this edition of ST, a discussion with the longtime Georgia-based journalist, Jim Auchmutey, who tells us about his new book: "The Class of '65: A Student, a Divided Town, and the Long Road to Forgiveness." It's a detailed profile of Americus High School, in rural southern Georgia, at a pivotal time in that school's -- and this country's -- history. In particular, Auchmutey depicts the life and times of one Greg Wittkamper, a student at the school who came from a nearby Christian commune that devoutly and publicly (and often quite dangerously) supported racial equality.

(Note: This show first aired back in March.) On this edition of ST, we speak with Cat Warren, a university professor and former journalist who for several years had an admittedly strange hobby -- that is, she and her German shepherd, Solo, would often go searching for the dead. Solo, now retired, was a cadaver dog -- and what began as an effort to make the best of Solo's unruly energy and boundless enthusiasm eventually became, for our guest today, a quest to learn all she could about so-called "working" dogs, their handlers, and their trainers.

On this installment of our show, an interesting discussion with Dr. Clark Elliott, an Associate Professor of Artificial Intelligence at DePaul University, who tells us about his new memoir, "The Ghost in My Brain: How a Concussion Stole My Life and How the New Science of Brain Plasticity Helped Me Get It Back." Back in 1999, Dr. Elliott suffered a concussion in a car wreck. His life changed instantly; he suddenly went from being a rising professor to a humbled man struggling to get through the day. At times he couldn't walk across a room, or open a door, or even name his children.

On this installment of ST, we speak with Jennifer Alden, the co-founder and co-director of the Tulsa-based dance company, Portico Dans Theatre. Aldren tells us about this company's latest production, which, per the Portico Dans Theatre website, "combines the drama of an opera ('Pagliacci') and the physicality of aerial dance in 'Pagliacci Project.' The production employs youth and adult dancers on aerial silks, lyra, trapeze, and the Spanish web.

On this edition of ST, we present a discussion with Steve Grantham, the executive director of Up With Trees. Started in 1976, this local nonprofit, as noted at its website, "has been faithful to its mission to beautify greater Tulsa by planting trees and creating urban forestry awareness through education.... In the last four decades, [Up With Trees has] planted over 30,000 trees at more than 500 sites throughout Tulsa. We plant along streets and trails, in parks, schools, fire stations, neighborhoods, and many other public properties....

One day in 1903, in the sandy, seaside Outer Banks of North Carolina, two unknown brothers from Ohio changed the direction of history. But it would take the world some time catch up with -- to both understand and appreciate -- what had happened that day. The age of flight had arrived, but its origin had been decidedly quiet, obscure, remote. And who exactly were Wilbur and Orville Wright, anyway? Our guest on ST is the distinguished American historian and biographer -- and two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize -- David McCullough, who joins us to talk about his newest book.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Lindsay Ketterer Gates, a Pennsylvania-based fiber artist who creates, as noted at her website, "slightly obsessive mixed-media work [that] springs from a background in and love of fiber techniques combined with a curiosity for all things purchased in bulk.

Our guest on ST via telephone is Nancy Pearl, our longtime book reviewer, a bestselling author, critic, editor, and retired librarian (and former citizen of Tulsa) who can also be heard regularly on NPR's Morning Edition. Now that the warm and sunny days of summer have finally arrived, Nancy joins us with a stack of favorites that ought to be perfect for that long trip in the car, endless airplane ride, idle day at the beach, lazy afternoon in the hammock, or all of the above.

On this installment of our show, a conversation with the distinguished historian and scholar, Robert Middlekauff, who is the Preston Hotchkis Professor of American History, Emeritus, at the University of California, Berkeley. Middlekauff -- whose earlier books include "The Mathers: Three Generations of Puritan Intellectuals, 1596–1728," which won the Bancroft Prize, and "The Glorious Cause: The American Revolution, 1763–1789," which was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize -- joins us to talk about his latest book, "Washington's Revolution: The Making of America's First Leader" (Knopf).

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