Matt Trotter

Reporter

Matt Trotter joined KWGS as a reporter in 2013. Before coming to Public Radio Tulsa, he was the investigative producer at KJRH. His freelance work has appeared in the Los Angeles Times and on MSNBC and CNN. 

He has a master's degree from Arizona State University, where he spent a semester on the first reporting staff of Cronkite News Service's Washington, D.C., bureau. As a grad student, he won awards for multimedia journalism and in-depth TV reporting.

Matt is from Southern California, so he's slowly following Route 66 across the United States. He would have made it Chicago by now, but he's not a fan of long drives.

Ways to Connect

Matt Trotter / KWGS

Jenks has broken ground on a Vision 2025–funded park project.

Jenks Downtown Commons will connect the high school to downtown. The Tulsa County Vision Authority approved the $1.1 million project in November.

County Commissioner Karen Keith said the Vision 2025 sales tax is why downtown Tulsa has the BOK Center.

"And I will tell you, without the suburbs stepping up and taking their portion of Vision 2025 later, we would not have the facility that we have today," Keith said.

Tulsa County

The Tulsa County Sheriff’s longtime headquarters could go on the market.

County commissioners have approved an appraisal for the Dave Faulkner building at First Street and Denver Avenue. If it’s sold, TCSO would use the money to finish the north Tulsa training center and move there. Sheriff Vic Regalado said having both seems unfeasible.

"It's about the future, and you have to look ahead and say, 'Can you sustain this moving forward?' and I don't believe we're on solvent enough ground to do that," Regalado said.

Oklahoma Watch

A presidential proclamation makes this week Prescription Opioid and Heroin Epidemic Awareness Week.

In 2014, 78 Americans per day died from an opioid-related overdoses. Office of National Drug Control Policy Director Michael Botticelli said that needs to stop.

"And the best way to do that right now is for Congress to provide the $1.1 billion in funding President Obama requested, which would help states expand their prevention, treatment and recovery support services," Botticelli said.

Oklahoma stands to benefit greatly from that funding.

KWGS News

A few dozen protesters gathered outside the Tulsa County courthouse Monday morning to protest the fatal police shooting of a black man whose SUV had stalled on a city street.

The protest Monday comes in response to the death of 40-year-old Terence Crutcher, who was shot Friday. Authorities released audio and video recordings of the shooting Monday afternoon.

Mareo Johnson said Crutcher was a brother to him, and these sorts of shootings could create unrest if they're not dealt with.

File photo

A June 2007 storm in Oklahoma produced the longest lightning flash in the world.

A World Meteorological Organization committee determined the bolt covered 199.5 miles. NASA research scientist Timothy Lang measured the flash, which started near Tulsa and reached the panhandle.

"When these big — we call them mesoscale convective systems or squall lines — in these big systems, it's very common to see large lightning flashes, but this was extremely unusual," Lang said.

A prolonged oil slump will keep challenging Oklahoma, according to credit rating giant Moody’s.

In a new report, Moody’s analysts said they expect Oklahoma’s sharp decline in oil and gas tax revenue to continue. State Finance Secretary Preston Doerflinger said Oklahoma leaders agree with Moody’s outlook.

"We know we're in a challenging time, and we just have to do the things necessary to position the state in the best way possible," Doerflinger said.

Matt Trotter / KWGS

Tulsa’s new 311 system still isn’t up and running after more than a year of delays, but it might be ready by the end of the month.

The high-tech system from Verint has a mobile app, online chat and a voice response system. It was originally set for a summer 2015 launch, but that was delayed until mid-January. That date was then missed because of apparent software bugs.

Now, the servers keep crashing.

City of Tulsa

Tulsa school districts in line for $10 million in Vision funding are changing their minds about the program it will support.

Jenks, Union and Tulsa Public Schools representatives are no longer envisioning the "live" component of the teacher recruitment program that came to be known as "Teach, Live T-Town."

"There were discussions back before the vote about the possibility of a teacher town or teacher village, which would be a redevelopment project," said City Manager Jim Twombly.

Matt Trotter / KWGS

City officials appear set to spend more than half a million dollars to improve access to a recently announced southwest Tulsa sports complex.

City councilors will consider using $550,000 in Improve Our Tulsa funds for work on 71st Street to benefit the Titan Sports and Performance Center. Plans for the 60-acre complex near Tulsa Hills only have an entrance on 81st Street, which is prone to flooding.

Titan Sports board member Danny Christner said they always wanted 71st Street access because of how many people may use the sports complex.

Route 66 News

The board tasked with boosting Tulsa’s share of the Mother Road hopes for some influence over Vision 2025–funded projects.

The Tulsa Route 66 Commission would like to help guide certain projects on the master plan list that are yet to be completed, like streetscaping and sign projects. Those projects' total funding is about $1.8 million.

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