John Henning Schumann

StudioTulsa Guest Host and Host of Medical Matters

John Henning Schumann, M.D., is an internal medicine physician and writer (http://glasshospital.com). He has contributed to Slate, The Atlantic, Marketplace, and National Public Radio’s health blog, Shots.

Schumann serves as guest host for Studio Tulsa on health-related themes and is also host of Medical Matters on KWGS, an occasional series about health care and the human condition.

He was appointed Interim President of the University of Oklahoma – Tulsa in January 2015. You can find him on twitter @GlassHospital.

Ways To Connect

Executions in this country often draw controversy. But when the headlines about them include words like botched or bungled, the debate about capital punishment enters new territory.

Host John Schumann speaks with Rishi Manchanda, author of the TED Book "The Upstream Doctors," regarding new ideas in medical education and so-called 'social determinants of health.' Gary Schwitzer of HealthNewsReview.org reviews the week's health news, and essayist Margaret McCartney from Glasgow teaches us to be wary of 'over-screening' in medical care.

 

Host John Schumann speaks with Leslie Kernisan, a geriatrician in San Francisco and author of the "GeriTech" blog. Gary Schwitzer of HealthNewsReview.org reviews the week's health news, and we hear an essay from Janet Pearson about the experience of enrolling her husband in Medicare.

 

Host John Schumann speaks with Daniel Siegel, a UCLA psychiatrist and author of the best-selling new book "Brainstorm." Gary Schwitzer of HealthNewsReview.org reviews the week's health news, and we present an essay by Harvard Medical Student Shara Yurkiewicz entitled "Being Sorry."

This program aired on February 27 and 28 on Public Radio 89.5 KWGS.

 

    

Host John Schumann speaks with Sherry Glied, a health economist who served as Assistant Secretary for Health and Human Services from 2010-2012. Gary Schwitzer of HealthNewsReview.org reviews the week's health news, and we hear a reflection from Janet Pearson on the term "nanny state."

This program aired on February 20 and 21 on Public Radio 89.5 KWGS.

 

I pulled back the curtain, ready to meet the next patient on my hospital rounds.

"Why are you standing there?" she asked me. "Come, have a seat, let's talk."

Lenore could have been my grandmother. She was 77 years old, and all of 93 pounds. What she lacked in girth, she more than made up for in chutzpah. She was one of the patients from intern year who I'll never forget.

December is supposed to be the time of year filled with family gatherings and holiday good cheer. For medical residents, quite the opposite is true.

There are no school breaks during residency. Being a medical resident is a real job, and a stressful one at that. Residents work long shifts, even with caps that max out at 16 hours for the newbies and up to 28 hours for those beyond the first year.

A 40-something patient I'll call Ted has a list of conditions that would have tongue-tied Carl Sagan. Even though I see Ted in my clinic every month, he still winds up visiting the emergency room 20 times per year.

Yes, 20.

Before he became my patient, he went even more frequently. So, the current situation, bad as it may be, represents halting progress.

Debate is raging about Obamacare, and not just in Washington. Out here in Oklahoma we're grappling with implementation of the Affordable Care Act. Patients. Employers. Hospitals. Doctors. Insurers. All of us.

Here then are one doctor's predictions about what we will see in the short and medium term for what I see as the unfolding Obamacare era — the biggest domestic health expansion since the enactment of Medicare in 1965.

I became a doctor to help people.

When I was a medical student, I held the naive and idealistic belief that if I just did good work, the business side of things would somehow take care of itself.

How wrong I was.

Now I'm an internist taking care of all comers age 18 and up. Some days I find myself facing patients and feeling more like a harried airline clerk than a real doctor.

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