John Henning Schumann

StudioTulsa Guest Host and Host of Medical Matters

John Henning Schumann, M.D., is an internal medicine physician and writer ( He has contributed to Slate, The Atlantic, Marketplace, and National Public Radio’s health blog, Shots.

Schumann serves as guest host for Studio Tulsa on health-related themes and is also host of Medical Matters on KWGS, an occasional series about health care and the human condition.

He was appointed Interim President of the University of Oklahoma – Tulsa in January 2015. You can find him on twitter @GlassHospital.

Ways to Connect

For this fourth and final episode in our limited series of Medical Matters shows for Fall 2015, we speak with Dr. Angelo Volandes of Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital. He's also also the author of a popular new guidebook, which he tells us about.

For Episode # 3 of 4 in our current series of Medical Matters shows, we feature an in-depth discussion with Dr. Damon Tweedy, an African American psychiatrist at Duke University. Dr.

If you follow health news, by now you may have heard about a federally funded study that was stopped early because of impressive evidence that aggressively lowering blood pressure saves lives.

Medical Matters continues with Show # 2 of our current four-episode limited series.

How did the rapid rise of OxyContin addiction in the 1990s lead quite directly to today's widespread crisis of heroin usage in Middle America? This week, we explore that question in a fascinating discussion with journalist Sam Quniones about his new book, "Dreamland: The True Tale of America's Opiate Epidemic."

Medical Matters has returned! The popular "program about health care and the human condition" -- created here at Public Radio Tulsa by host John Schumann and editor/producer Scott Gregory -- began a four-episode limited series on Thursday, September 10th.

Beware the mention of natural causes, as in my mother's obituary:

"Norita Wyse Berman, a writer, stockbroker and artist ... died at home Friday of natural causes. She was 60."

Sixty-year-olds don't die of natural causes anymore. The truth was too hard to admit.

Fifteen years on, I'm ashamed of my family's shame. Those attending her funeral and paying shiva calls knew the truth anyway. People talk.

Famed doctor and medical educator William Osler once said, "A physician who treats himself has a fool for a patient."

What, I wonder, does that say about us doctors who treat our own kids?

This past winter, my daughter got the flu. She was miserable: daily fevers, achiness, sore throat, stuffy head and nausea with a total loss of appetite.

We didn't run a flu test on her, which you can do with a quick nasal swab at a doctor's office. Since my wife and I are both docs, we were comfortable that her symptoms fit the diagnosis.

Oscar buzz surrounds Julianne Moore for her role as Alice Howland in the film Still Alice. Howland is a linguistics professor who develops early-onset Alzheimer's, a cruel irony for a character who makes her living with her brain.

Howland's awareness of her fate makes her decline all the more painful to watch.

Often, though, patients and their doctors can be slow to recognize dementia, which most often progresses gradually.

The holidays are here, bringing joy and, for some, wistful feelings.

Doctors are no different. Even for a profession that prides itself on scientific proof, the long nights of December afford ample opportunity for reflection and even doubt.

As we take stock of what we've accomplished and where we've failed to measure up, I find my scowling mask of medical skepticism falling away. I have to admit that there is so much wonder and mystery that science and medicine still can't explain.

Maybe you've heard about the slow food movement. Maybe you're a devotee.

The idea is that cooking, nutrition and eating should be intentional, mindful and substantive. Avoid fast food and highly processed grub. For the slow food set, the process is as important as the product.

Now I'm seeing a medical version of slow food. The concept is bubbling up in response to industrialized, hypertechnological and often unnecessary medical care that drives up costs and leaves both doctors and patients frazzled.