John Durkee

News Director & Morning Edition anchor

John Durkee is the News Director for KWGS. He has over 40-years of experience in radio news and has served as News Director of radio stations in Tulsa, Missouri and Kansas.  He was also a reporter in Oklahoma City, early in his career. He is a Tulsa native and served as the City of Tulsa Communications Director prior to joining the staff at KWGS.

Durkee has won countless awards for his work as a broadcaster, including awards from the Radio and Television News Directors Association, the Associated Press, United Press International, The Society of Professional Journalists and the Oklahoma and Missouri Association of Broadcasters. He is a member of the Oklahoma Journalism Hall of Fame. Durkee was named the Tulsa Press Club's 2016 Tulsa Media Icon.

He is a past board member of the Oklahoma Associated Press Broadcasters, the Kansas Association of News Broadcasters and the former Tulsa Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists. He resides in Bixby with his wife, Carol.

 

 

Ways to Connect

Perry Public Schools

 

A principal and a teacher north of Oklahoma City who are accused of failing to report alleged child abuse may resign.

An agenda shows that the Perry Public School board will meet Monday to consider the resignations and resignation agreements of Upper Elementary School Principal Kenda Miller and math teacher Jeffrey Sullins.

The Oklahoman reports that the educators are charged with failure to promptly report child abuse or neglect.

In the local news:

  • A measure limiting LGTBQ rights fails in the state senate.
  • Tulsa Police release the video of a deadly encounter with a crime spree suspect.
  • Former State Senator Ralph Shortey to be arraigned today

In the local news:

  • A child is dead... care giver abuse is suspected.
  • The Gathering Place gets its playground equipment.
  • Broken Arrow could have three high schools by 2031.

In the local news:

  • Tulsa's Meals on Wheels readies for federal budget cuts.
  • Wildfires burn across eastern Oklahoma.
  • A pipeline protest is set for this weekend in Tulsa.

In the local news:

  • A measure allowing people to carry guns on mass transit buses passes the Oklahoma House.
  • Attorney: Ralph Shortey will resign from the Oklahoma Senate.
  • A Tulsa jury awards $10 million in the Elliot Williams wrongful death case.

In the local news:

  • A new report indicates over half of the home rental property is substandard.
  • The investigation continues into a weekend fire at a home in Broken Arrow where five people were murdered in 2015.
  • Over 43,000 people take in the NCAA Basketball tournament in Tulsa over the weekend.

Bever Murder Home Burns

Mar 18, 2017
KWGS News

For the second time in less than two-years, yellow crime scene tape surrounds the Bever home in Broken Arrow. In the summer of 2015, this home was the scene of a mass murder. Two teenager brothers, Robert and Michael Bever, were accused of killing their parents and three siblings. Early Saturday morning, the vacant home at the Indian Springs Country Club burned.

Fire officials say the blaze broke out about 3:30 Saturday morning and gutted the house before the fire was brought under control. There is no word  yet on the cause of the fire.

In the local news:

  • Senator Ralph Shortey is out on bail on prostitution charges with a teenage male.
  • Federal funding elimination for the arts would impact Tulsa's art scene.
  • Tulsa welcomes NCAA basketball fans.

In the local news:

  • The State Senate suspends member Ralph Shortey amid an investigation of prostitution with a teenage boy.
  • 16 state parks could be closed because of budget cuts.
  • The USS Tulsa goes for a test run in the Gulf of Mexico.

In the local news:

  • The GOP Health Plan would hit Oklahoma hard according to a new report.
  • A State Senator is being investigated by Moore Police.
  • Large crowds expected downtown for NCAA tourney and St. Patrick's parties.

In the local news:

  • The mayor proposes new agreements between the city and the Riverparks Authority.
  • Teach for America brings Spring Break students to Tulsa.
  • The western Oklahoma wildfires are out.

In the local news:

  • Two teenagers are dead and third hospitalized following a shooting in Northwest Tulsa.
  • Governor Fallin seeks help for burned out Oklahoma ranchers.
  • Oklahoma's divorce rules could be drastically changed under legislation in the state house.

In the local news:

  • State Lawmakers roll back correction reform measures approved by voters.
  • Additional budget cuts would cripple the Highway Patrol.
  • Winds calm as the western Oklahoma wildfires continue burning.

In the local news:

  • A Mumps outbreak is confirmed in Tulsa County.
  • Wild fires continue to burn in western Oklahoma.
  • Debate gets heated on "Blue Lives Matter' legislation at the State Capitol.

In the local news:

  • Two are dead as wildfires continue to burn in Oklahoma.
  • An enrollment meeting for the Zarrow International School is halted as tempers flare.
  • A murder suspect is arrested in Rogers County

In the local news:

  • Storms cause problems and damage across the region.
  • No school in Verdigris as the community searches for a suspected killer.
  • Shots taken at Tulsa's Equality Center.

In the local news:

  • Trump Administration policies are making Tulsa's immigration population nervous.
  • An overnight fire destroys a horse boarding facility in Broken Arrow.
  • Teacher pay hikes no look unlikely in the legislature.

In the local news:

  • More Tulsa County Flu deaths.
  • The Governor signs the REAL ID Act.
  • A burned food pantry at Turley vows to continue its mission.

In the local news:

  • The Tulsa City Council approves the Helmerich Park deal.
  • A fire destroys a Turley community center and food bank.
  • The 'For Sale' sign is down in front of the GRDA.

In the local news:

  • REAL ID heads to the Governor.
  • Revitalization is underway at the old Tulsa Club.
  • No surprise. Oklahoma's all Republican delegation in Washington liked the President's speech.

In the local news:

  • A school consolidation study passes a state senate committee.
  • Gasoline prices jump 15 cents in Tulsa.
  • School leftovers could be given to Oklahoma food banks.

In the local news:

  • The cash-strapped state needs a new medical lab.
  • An environmental group comes out against a proposed 'wind tax'.
  • Tulsa gasoline is the cheapest in the nation.

In the local news:

  • A proposal clears a state senate committee to relocate an Oklahoma Veterans' Home.
  • The state school board is briefed on the revenue shortage.
  • A gas well explosion injures four in Wagoner County.

KWGS News

Tulsa elementary students crowd into the auditorium at Will Rogers College High School. They are there to learn and show off their skills in a partnership with the Tulsa Symphony Orchestra.

For more than 30 years, Carnegie Hall Link Up has paired orchestras with students in grades 3-5 to explore orchestral repertoire and fundamental musical skills, including creative work and composition, through a hands-on music curriculum. Tulsa Symphony became a Link Up partner in the 2015-16 season.

In the local news:

  • A senate committee approves REAL ID.
  • Pruitt's emails show a cozy relationship with fossil fuel.
  • Repeal of the ACA is making low income health care providers nervous.

In the local news:

  • The latest on the Oklahoma Budget.
  • The Tulsa School Board welcomes a new member.
  • A Helmerich Park vote is delayed by the City Council.

KWGS News File Photo

Here are the first two parts of our special news series:  

In the local news:

  • The Tulsa City Council considers what to do with Helmerich Park.
  • Mike Hunter will replace Scott Pruitt as Oklahoma's Attorney General.
  • Another revenue failure is expected for Oklahoma.

This is part one of a three part series looking at the craft of journalism.

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