Greg Allen

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Severe Weather Information From KWGS News

Here is your one stop location for information you need concerning our severe weather threat in Green Country. Click here for the latest weather radar information from the Oklahoma MesonetAt this link you will find the latest severe weather watches and warnings for all of Oklahoma.For a discussion on the severe weather threat from the Tulsa National Weather Service office.The latest information from the National Storms Prediction Center can be found here.To download the Red Cross Tornado App...
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Tulsa Regional Chamber

Public Education Officials Agree State of Education is Underfunded

Officials in each of Oklahoma’s three public education systems say the state of education is poorly funded. At their state of education forum, leaders with the Tulsa Regional Chamber said students going on summer break will come back to drastically different schools as new cuts take effect. Tulsa Superintendent Deborah Gist said on top of that, decades of underfunding have left Oklahomans unaware of what they don’t have but should in K–12 schools. "We do not do enough to support our students...
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North Carolina Files Lawsuit Defending Its 'Bathroom Law'

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit src="http://www.google-analytics.com/__utm.gif?utmac=UA-5828686-4&utmdt=North+Carolina+Files+Lawsuit+Defending+Its+%27Bathroom+Law%27&utme=8(APIKey)9(MDA5MTYwMDQ1MDEzMzE1ODcyMjRmY2FlMA004)"/>
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StudioTulsa

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we welcome back to our show Marcello Angelini, the longtime artistic director of Tulsa Ballet, who tells us about the company's latest production. It's a three-part evening -- entitled "Signature Series" -- that features some of Angelini's favorite ballets: "Serenade" by George Balanchine (music by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky), "Remansos" by Nacho Duato (music by Enrique Granados), and "Infra" by Wayne McGregor (music by Max Richter).

Tomorrow night, Thursday the 5th, the Tulsa Council for Holocaust Education and Tulsa City-County Library (or TCCL) will jointly present the 19th Annual Yom HaShoah, which is an Interfaith Holocaust Commemoration happening at Temple Israel (near Utica Square in Tulsa). It's free to the public and begins at 7pm; the theme for this year's gathering is "Close to Evil." The keynote speaker at this special event will be Tomi Reichental, who is our guest today on StudioTulsa.

(Please note: This show first aired last November.) Our guest on this edition of ST is Gaia Vince, a British journalist and broadcaster specializing in science and the environment. She's been the editor of the journal Nature Climate Change, the news editor of Nature, and the online editor of New Scientist, and she joins us to discuss her latest book: "Adventures in the Anthropocene: A Journey to the Heart of the Planet We Made." The so-called Anthropocene -- or the Age of Man -- has brought, of course, widespread and dramatic change to the face of the earth.

(Note: This interview first aired back in December.) Not only are we learning more and more about the brain these days -- in ways various, surprising, and remarkable -- but we're also learning more and more about traumatic brain injury (or TBI). Our guest is Dr. Sandeep Vaishnavi, the director of the Neuropsychiatric Clinic at Carolina Partners, who's also a neuropsychiatrist at the Tisch Brain Tumor Center at Duke University Medical Center. Dr.

(Note: This interview originally aired in July of last year.) On this presentation of ST, we chat with Joe Randazzo, a former editor of The Onion and former creative director of adultswim.com who now writes for the Comedy Central program called @midnight.

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Is Klingon A Living Language? That's For (Human) Courts To Decide

A new lawsuit is boldly going where no man has gone before.Paramount Pictures and CBS are suing the producers of a Star Trek fan film for copyright infringement. The studios own the copyright to the Star Trek franchise, including six television shows and 12 movies.They're suing Axanar Productions along with executive producer Alec Peters over their 2014 short film Prelude to Axanar, and the planned full-length Axanar. Peters raised more than $101,000 on Kickstarter to make the first film, and...
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With Monday's departure of reporter Jennifer Robison from the Las Vegas Review-Journal, none of the three journalists who helped uncover the secret sale of the newspaper to casino magnate Sheldon Adelson remains at the company.

Robison, who took a job in communications for Pacific Gas and Electric Company in San Francisco, left after the exits of her former colleagues, reporters Howard Stutz and James DeHaven.

California Gov. Jerry Brown has made some of the state's temporary water restrictions permanent. The executive order, in response to the state's drought, permanently bans wasteful practices like hosing sidewalks and washing cars with hoses that don't have shut-off nozzles.

The speaker of Brazil's lower house of Congress on Monday annulled last month's vote on the impeachment of embattled President Dilma Rousseff. But shortly afterward, the leader of Brazil's Senate announced he will ignore the lower house leader's decision and press on with the impeachment process.

The political seesawing further complicates the already chaotic struggle for political power in Brazil's government.

Bernie Sanders has some of the most ambitious and sweeping policy proposals of all the presidential candidates. His campaign has centered on a promise of "revolution."

When King Salman assumed the throne in Saudi Arabia last year, he was pushing 80, his health was questionable and many thought he would be more a caretaker than a monarch of note.

Yet Salman has unleashed major initiatives and shaken up the kingdom, setting a course for change in a land where the watchwords have long been tradition, stability and continuity.

West Point is investigating whether black female cadets violated any rules by raising their fists in a photo. The 16 women, following school tradition, posed in historical-style uniforms ahead of graduation later this month.

The investigation will look into whether the cadets violated the school honor code or a Department of Defense rule about political activities while in the Armed Forces.

The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists just released a searchable database with the names of more than 300,000 people and companies included in the so-called "Panama Papers."

The database is barebones, containing the name of the entity and how its connected to an offshore account.

Private Medicare Advantage plans treating the elderly have overbilled the government by billions of dollars, but rarely been forced to repay the money or face other consequences for their actions, according to a congressional audit released Monday.

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As NPR's Miami correspondent, Greg Allen reports on the diverse issues and developments tied to the Southeast. He covers everything from breaking news to economic and political stories to arts and human interest features. He moved into this role in 2006, after four years as NPR's Midwest correspondent.

Allen was a key part of NPR's coverage of the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, providing some of the first reports on the disaster. He was on the frontlines of NPR's coverage of Hurricane Katrina in 2005, arriving in New Orleans before the storm hit and filing on the chaos and flooding that hit the city as the levees broke. Allen's reporting played an important role in NPR's coverage of the aftermath and the rebuilding of New Orleans, as well as in coverage of the BP oil spill which brought new hardships to the Gulf coast.

As NPR's only correspondent in Florida, Allen covered the dizzying boom and bust of the state's real estate market, the state's important role in the 2008 presidential election and has produced stories highlighting the state's unique culture and natural beauty, from Miami's Little Havana to the Everglades.

Allen has spent more than three decades in radio news, the first ten as a reporter in Ohio and Philadelphia and the last as an editor, producer and reporter at NPR.

Before moving into reporting, Allen served as the executive producer of NPR's national daily live call-in show, Talk of the Nation. As executive producer he handled the day-to-day operations of the program as well as developed and produced remote broadcasts with live audiences and special breaking news coverage. He was with Talk of the Nation from 2000 to 2002.

Prior to that position, Allen spent three years as a senior editor for NPR's Morning Edition, developing stories and interviews, shaping the program's editorial direction, and supervising the program's staff. In 1993, he started a four year stint as an editor with Morning Edition just after working as Morning Edition's swing editor, providing editorial and production supervision in the early morning hours. Allen also worked for a time as the editor of NPR's National Desk.

Before coming to NPR, Allen was a reporter with NPR member station WHYY-FM in Philadelphia from 1987 to 1990.

His radio career includes serving as the producer of Freedom's Doors Media Project — five radio documentaries on immigration in American cities that was distributed through NPR's Horizons series — frequent freelance work with NPR, Monitor Radio, Voice of America, and WHYY-FM, and work as a reporter/producer of NPR member station WYSO-FM in Yellow Springs, Ohio.

Allen graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 1977, with a B.A. cum laude. As a student and after graduation, Allen worked at WXPN-FM, the public radio station on campus, as a host and producer for a weekly folk music program that included interviews, features, live and recorded music.

The island of Puerto Rico is caught in an economic crisis. While the rest of the U.S. is seeing economic growth, Puerto Rico is struggling to emerge from nine years of recession. The poor economy has spurred hundreds of thousands to leave the island.

The U.S territory is more than $72 billion in debt, running low on cash and on the verge of default.

Ten years ago, the U.S. experienced its busiest hurricane season ever recorded. The year saw 28 named storms — 15 of them hurricanes — including Hurricane Katrina, which devastated the Gulf Coast. Four major hurricanes hit the U.S. in 2005, beginning in July with Hurricane Dennis.

Puerto Rico used to produce some of the best coffee in the world — but that was more than a century ago.

Today, Puerto Rico's coffee crop is just a fraction of what it was then, and little is exported. But there's a movement on the island to improve quality and rebuild Puerto Rico's coffee industry.

As a U.S. territory with tropical weather and beautiful beaches, Puerto Rico has a lot going for it. But there are downsides to living on an island. A big one is the cost of energy.

All the electricity on the island is distributed by the government-owned Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority, also known as PREPA. Power on the island costs more than in any U.S. state, except Hawaii.

And that's not the biggest problem.

Although it's a tropical island, perhaps surprisingly, Puerto Rico produces very little of its own food. After decades of industrialization, the U.S. territory imports more than 80 percent of what's consumed on the island. There are signs, though, the trend is changing.

The island of Puerto Rico is many things: a tropical paradise, a U.S. territory and an economic mess. After years of deficits, state-owned institutions in Puerto Rico owe investors some $73 billion. That's four times the debt that forced Detroit into bankruptcy two years ago. The bill is now due.

It's been a week of goodbyes at the Homeless Voice in Hollywood, Fla. For nearly 13 years, this rundown, 22-room hotel operated as a homeless shelter.

On most nights, hotel manager Christine Jordan says, more than 200 homeless men and women stayed here, some sleeping on mats in the cafeteria.

"We called this the emergency level ... almost 40 people in here every night," she says. Some stayed for free and others paid on a sliding scale. "[Now], everything's gone. I can't cry anymore."

Termites are among the world's most destructive pests, causing more than a billion dollars in damage each year in the U.S. alone. Scientists in Florida have tracked the development of a new hybrid species of termite — one whose colonies grow twice as fast as the parent species.

Researchers say the new "super-termite" is even more destructive than other species and may carry a significant economic cost.

A record number of inmates – 346 people — died behind bars in Florida last year.

Most were from natural causes, but a series of suspicious deaths have raised questions about safety in the prisons. Federal and state law enforcement agencies are now investigating why so many inmates have been dying.

Latandra Ellington, 36, was serving time for tax fraud at Lowell Correctional Institution in central Florida when she died. Algarene Jennings, Ellington's aunt, believes she was murdered.

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