Dina Temple-Raston

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2 Dead in Oklahoma Tornadoes

Two people have been killed by strong tornadoes that swept across portions of southern Oklahoma. Johnston County Sheriff's Sgt. Stacey Pulley says a man died Monday near the town of Connerville. A storm earlier in the day killed a man in a home near Wynnewood. The Storm Prediction Center had said the Plains and Arkansas. Some of Monday's weather has been so bad that forecasters declared a "tornado emergency" for the towns of Roff and Hickory, which were in the path of a storm. An emergency...
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Suspended Wagoner County Sheriff in Court

Wagoner County's suspended sheriff has pleaded not guilty to bribery and extortion charges. The Tulsa World reports that Bob Colbert pleaded not guilty on Monday. A grand jury says Colbert and Capt. Jeff Gragg conspired to take $10,000 from two motorists in exchange for not pursuing drug charges against them in December 2014. Colbert and Gragg are charged with conspiracy to receive a bribe, receiving a bribe and committing extortion through threats. Both men face up to 25 years in prison. It...
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California Governor Makes Some Water Restrictions Permanent

California Gov. Jerry Brown has made some of the state's temporary water restrictions permanent. The executive order, in response to the state's drought, permanently bans wasteful practices like hosing sidewalks and washing cars with hoses that don't have shut-off nozzles."Californians stepped up during this drought and saved more water than ever before," Brown said in a statement. "But now we know that drought is becoming a regular occurrence and water conservation must be a part of our...
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StudioTulsa

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we welcome back to our show Marcello Angelini, the longtime artistic director of Tulsa Ballet, who tells us about the company's latest production. It's a three-part evening -- entitled "Signature Series" -- that features some of Angelini's favorite ballets: "Serenade" by George Balanchine (music by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky), "Remansos" by Nacho Duato (music by Enrique Granados), and "Infra" by Wayne McGregor (music by Max Richter).

Tomorrow night, Thursday the 5th, the Tulsa Council for Holocaust Education and Tulsa City-County Library (or TCCL) will jointly present the 19th Annual Yom HaShoah, which is an Interfaith Holocaust Commemoration happening at Temple Israel (near Utica Square in Tulsa). It's free to the public and begins at 7pm; the theme for this year's gathering is "Close to Evil." The keynote speaker at this special event will be Tomi Reichental, who is our guest today on StudioTulsa.

(Please note: This show first aired last November.) Our guest on this edition of ST is Gaia Vince, a British journalist and broadcaster specializing in science and the environment. She's been the editor of the journal Nature Climate Change, the news editor of Nature, and the online editor of New Scientist, and she joins us to discuss her latest book: "Adventures in the Anthropocene: A Journey to the Heart of the Planet We Made." The so-called Anthropocene -- or the Age of Man -- has brought, of course, widespread and dramatic change to the face of the earth.

(Note: This interview first aired back in December.) Not only are we learning more and more about the brain these days -- in ways various, surprising, and remarkable -- but we're also learning more and more about traumatic brain injury (or TBI). Our guest is Dr. Sandeep Vaishnavi, the director of the Neuropsychiatric Clinic at Carolina Partners, who's also a neuropsychiatrist at the Tisch Brain Tumor Center at Duke University Medical Center. Dr.

(Note: This interview originally aired in July of last year.) On this presentation of ST, we chat with Joe Randazzo, a former editor of The Onion and former creative director of adultswim.com who now writes for the Comedy Central program called @midnight.

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Study: Sanders' Proposals Would Add $18 Trillion To Debt Over 10 Years

Bernie Sanders has some of the most ambitious and sweeping policy proposals of all the presidential candidates. His campaign has centered on a promise of "revolution."But revolution would be really expensive, according to a new report. The Tax Policy Center estimated on Monday that Sanders' taxation-and-spending plans — including outlays for programs like Medicare for all and free college tuition — would together add $18 trillion to the national debt over a decade. In addition, the center's...
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The Code Switch Podcast Is Coming! Get A Sneak Peek!

46 minutes ago

You've been asking for it. We've been cranking on it. And now, it's happening: the Code Switch podcast!

Check out the trailer and subscribe to our podcast so you don't miss the first episode later this month!

So, what's this podcast all about? All the stuff you come to Code Switch for: deeply reported, urgent, hard-to-pin-down stories about race and culture. Conversations about the messy ways our identities crash into everything else in our lives, whether we realize it or not.

President Obama will visit Hiroshima later this month, while he's in Japan for the G-7 summit, the White House has confirmed.

The trip will mark the first visit by a U.S. president to the site since American forces dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki at the end of World War II.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Hillary Clinton would have a significant electoral advantage over Donald Trump in the general election, based on an NPR analysis.

The Democratic former secretary of state would start out with already exactly enough electoral votes to win the presidency, 270-191, based on states considered safe, likely and to lean toward either candidate. The ratings, which will be updated at least monthly until Election Day, are based on fundamentals — historical trends and demographics, plus reporting and polling (both public and private).

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

America's culture war, waged in recent years over gender roles, sexuality and the definition of marriage, is increasingly being fought inside evangelical Christian circles. On one side are the Christians determined to resist trends in secular society that appear to conflict with biblical teaching. On the other side are the evangelicals willing to live with those trends.

For Albert Mohler, president of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Ky., the key question is "whether or not there is a binding morality to which everyone is accountable."

Imagine this scenario: A young Muslim leaves home to travel to Syria to join ISIS. Thousands of young men from Europe have done exactly that in the past two years.

But here's the twist: Imagine that just weeks after arriving, the young man realizes he's made a terrible mistake. What does he do now?

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Dina Temple-Raston is NPR's counter-terrorism correspondent and has been reporting from all over the world for the network's news magazines since 2007.

She recently completed a Nieman Fellowship at Harvard University where she studied the intersection of Big Data and intelligence.

Prior to NPR, Temple-Raston was a longtime foreign correspondent for Bloomberg News in Asia and served as Bloomberg's White House correspondent during the Clinton Administration. She has written four books, including The Jihad Next Door: Rough Justice in the Age of Terror, about the Lackawanna Six terrorism case. She is a frequent contributor to the PBS Newshour, a regular reviewer of national security books for the Washington Post Book World, and also contributes to the New Yorker, WNYC's Radiolab, the TLS, and the Columbia Journalism Review, among others.

She is a graduate of Northwestern University and Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism, and she has an Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters from Manhattanville College.

The American Psychological Association voted Friday in favor of a resolution that would bar its members from participating in national security interrogations.

The resolution by the country's largest professional organization of psychologists passed overwhelmingly. The only dissenting vote came from Col. Larry James, a former Army intelligence psychologist at Guantanamo.

The family of Mohammod Youssuf Abdulazeez has been holed up with friends since the 24-year-old went on a shooting rampage in Chattanooga, Tenn., that ultimately left four Marines and a sailor dead.

A representative of the family, who would speak only on condition of anonymity, said since Thursday's shooting, Abdulazeez's family has received numerous death threats.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

FBI Director James Comey told senators on Wednesday that increased encryption on mobile devices is complicating the FBI's job.

Comey, along with a roster of Obama administration officials, has been asking Silicon Valley companies for months for a solution that would allow law enforcement to monitor communications with a court order, while protecting the privacy of consumers. Technology companies like Apple and Google have resisted their entreaties, setting off a tense debate over encrypted data and a user's right to own their own information.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

There's been a setback for a Minnesota man who had been a test case for deradicalization in this country.

U.S. authorities have arrested a third New York man in connection with an alleged plot to detonate pressure cooker bombs in New York City for the self-proclaimed Islamic State, or ISIS.

The latest arrest involved a 21-year-old Staten Island man named Fareed Mumuni who allegedly tried to kill a law enforcement official who came to his house earlier today. The criminal complaint alleged that he repeatedly attempted "to stab an FBI Special Agent with a large kitchen knife."

U.S. authorities arrested a 20-year-old Queens man over the weekend suspected of plotting to detonate a pressure cooker bomb in New York to show his devotion to the self-proclaimed Islamic State, or ISIS.

More than two years after the self-proclaimed Islamic State burst on the scene, it is still difficult to quantify just how big the threat is in this country. Counterterrorism officials say nearly 200 Americans have traveled to Syria and Iraq, are thinking about doing so or have returned to the U.S. after spending time there.

NPR has learned that number of returnees in this country is nearly three dozen — but their cases remain sealed.

As candidates hit the campaign trail, NPR looks at four major issues the next president will face from Day 1 in office.

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