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Scientists say that images from Mars show large slopes of ice — and provide a hint at how they were formed. One likely theory involves snowfall on the Red Planet.

The researchers say that the size and accessibility of the ice sheets, as well as the fact that they are made of relatively clean water, could be an important resource for astronauts who might travel to Mars in the future.

"The federal government must take bold action to address inequitable funding in our nation's public schools."

So begins a list of recommendations released Thursday by the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, an independent, bipartisan agency created by Congress in 1957 to investigate civil rights complaints. Thursday's report comes after a lengthy investigation into how America's schools are funded and why so many that serve poor and minority students aren't getting the resources they say they need.

In 2017, Lena Waithe made history as the first black woman to win an Emmy for outstanding comedy writing. The award specifically recognized Master of None's "Thanksgiving" episode, which Waithe co-wrote with Aziz Ansari and based on her experience coming out to her mother.

At a secluded retreat center outside Austin, about a dozen, mostly middle-aged women are gathered in a quiet conference room. Some huddle under blankets to ward off the chill from an unusual Texas cold spell.

This session's topic: guilt and shame.

"Does anybody feel like they're still dealing with, like, shame? Like, feeling bad about yourself as a person, because of what you've done in the clinics?" Abby Johnson asks the women seated in a circle of chairs around her.

Updated, Jan. 11, 4:00 p.m. ET: This article was updated to include new allegations of sexual assault made against Dutoit.

Updated at 8:11 p.m. ET

Officials have released the identities of 17 people killed in Tuesday's Santa Barbara, Calif., mudslides, as workers continue search and rescue efforts for victims caught in the deluge that swamped houses, crumpled cars and sent boulders careening through streets.

Updated at 5:50 p.m. ET

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens has confirmed that he had an extramarital affair before he was elected in 2016 — but he denies allegations that he used a naked photo to threaten to blackmail the woman he was sleeping with.

The standing desk is having a moment among office workers, but not everyone needs to stand more at work.

A study published Thursday in the latest issue of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report finds that many U.S. workers are already active on the job.

Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort, already under indictment by Department of Justice special counsel Robert Mueller, now has a new legal worry: a civil lawsuit filed by a company linked to a Russian oligarch.

Oleg Deripaska, the oligarch, is an ally of Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Elsa D'Silva was 13 years old. She was riding a local train in Mumbai, India, with her mother, sister and brother. And just as she was about to get off, she felt it — a hand reaching up her skirt.

"It affected my ability to use a train as a means of transport — and it still does, even still," D'Silva says. But for 25 years, she didn't tell anyone why she avoided trains.

The creator of an anonymously sourced list of men accused of sexual misconduct has chosen to identify herself, as rumors swirled that she would be named in a forthcoming article in Harper's magazine.

The "S***** Media Men" list first circulated among women working in media in October, shortly after the explosive New York Times story detailing the sexual harassment allegations against Harvey Weinstein.

Editor's Note: This story was originally published in 2017 and has been updated.

Tennis superstar Serena Williams clearly has conflicted feelings about marshmallows.

In a just-published interview in Vogue magazine, she and her husband talked about the so-called "marshmallow test." It's a well-known experiment to study children's self-control first run by a Stanford psychologist in the 1960s.

On a bright, beautiful October day, Lebanese fisherman Emilio Eid is in his boat on the Mediterranean Sea. Lebanon's scenic mountain ranges are clear in the distance.

But the water around him is brown and littered with pieces of floating plastic. He spots bottles, a toothbrush, a used condom. An acrid smell burns his eyes and throat.

"Garbage, garbage, garbage," Eid says, and turns to look toward the coast.

Updated at 12:20 p.m. ET

A controversial spying law survived in the House after a kerfuffle on Thursday when President Trump took aim at the bill despite his administration's formal support for it.

The House voted to reauthorize snooping provisions known by the Capitol Hill shorthand "Section 702," which are due to expire next week, and to extend the authority for six more years. The Senate would need to vote next in order to preserve them.

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Updated at 3:30 p.m. ET

Walmart is raising wages for new employees from $10 an hour to $11, expanding paid parental leave and offering a one-time bonus to eligible workers, actions that the company says will affect more than 1 million employees in the U.S.

The changes were announced Thursday. Later the same day, Walmart announced it is closing 63 Sam's Club stores, after "a thorough review of our existing portfolio."

Updated at 11:29 a.m. ET

The Trump administration is encouraging states to require "able-bodied" Medicaid recipients to work or volunteer in order to keep their health insurance coverage.

On Thursday, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, which is part of the Department of Health and Human Services, issued new guidelines for states that want some adults to work in exchange for the health insurance coverage.

Nearly two weeks after Logan Paul posted a YouTube video depicting an apparent suicide victim — and just over a week after he removed it and apologized — the online video platform has announced it is scaling back its relationship with the vlogging star.

A bumper sticker spotted in Montana reads, "No barley, no beer." It's a reminder that Montana's barley farmers are struggling. Barley is an unforgiving crop that needs a precise recipe of water and sunshine to thrive — too much of either will cause it to wither and die. And amid a changing climate and unpredictable seasons, that's exactly what's happening.

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Protesters took to the streets for the third night Wednesday in towns and cities across Tunisia, demonstrating against recently imposed price hikes on common goods.

At least one person has died and authorities said 330 people were arrested overnight, Reuters reports. Hundreds more were arrested earlier in the week, with about 600 now in custody in total.

The military deployed to multiple cities as some people blocked roads, threw stones and set fires.

Rep. Darrell Issa, R-Calif., announced Wednesday he will not seek what would be his 10th term in Congress, making him the second California Republican this week, along with House Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Ed Royce, to call it quits rather than face a possible Democratic wave in this year's midterms.

Joe Arpaio, the controversial former sheriff from Arizona, announced this week that he will run for the U.S. Senate to help advance President Trump's agenda.

But he is breaking from the president on the future of people who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children.

"Deport them," Arpaio told NPR Morning Edition's Rachel Martin in an interview that aired Thursday morning.

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We are beginning a midterm election year. Every seat in the House of Representatives is up for election, along with a third of the Senate. And in this year, an awful lot of Republicans are retiring or just choosing not to run for re-election.

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