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1:51 pm
Fri September 30, 2011

Data On Same-Sex Couples Reveal Changing Attitudes

Ryan Witmer (left) and Jhonmar Castillo wait with other couples to exchange vows in a civil union ceremony June 2 in Chicago's Millennium Park. New data from the U.S. census may reveal as much about changing attitudes as about changing numbers.
Scott Olson Getty Images

As bans on gay marriage and civil unions spread across the majority of America in the past decade, new U.S. Census figures reveal a starkly different trend: The number of same-sex partnerships skyrocketed even in the most prohibitive states.

Some 646,464 gay couples said they lived together in last year's census, an increase of 80 percent from 2000, according to revised figures released this week. Same-sex couples make up just 1 percent of all married and unmarried couples in the U.S., but as a group they nonetheless made large gains in every state.

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The Two-Way
1:11 pm
Fri September 30, 2011

Economists Say Indicators All Point Toward Recession

German Chancellor Angela Merkel leaves the Lower House of German parliament Bundestag in Berlin after a vote on legislation to expand the EU's rescue fund.
Michael Kappeller AFP/Getty Images

Today, we've read nothing but bad economic news. The worst of which came from the Economic Cycle Research Institute, an independent forecasting group.

Lakshman Achuthan, the managing director of ECRI, was on CNBC this morning and he had the hosts cringing. After Achutan said "a vicious circle has started," and that "we're not going to escape" a double-dip recession, one of the anchors said, "A drink?"

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The Two-Way
12:20 pm
Fri September 30, 2011

On NPR: Al-Awlaki Talked Of Muslims Being Hurt In Post-Sept. 11World

Long before U.S. officials said he was one of the world's most-wanted terrorists, Anwar al-Awlaki was a Muslim cleric who U.S. media outlets would turn to during discussions about the post-Sept. 11 world.

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It's All Politics
11:53 am
Fri September 30, 2011

Florida's Move Means Primaries, Like Holiday Season, Will Start Ever Earlier

The decision by Florida's Republican officials to move the state's presidential primary into January from March will have a range of effects, some foreseeable, some not.

By advancing its primary date to Jan. 31, Florida makes it virtually certain the four traditional early states — Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina and Nevada — will now move their caucuses and primaries to earlier in January to maintain their status as the earliest contests.

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Shots - Health Blog
11:26 am
Fri September 30, 2011

University Of New Hampshire Reverses Course On Ban Of Energy Drinks

A can of Red Bull, cracked and ready for consumption, on a table at the student union building at the University of New Hampshire in Durham.
Holly Ramer AP

Originally published on Mon April 30, 2012 8:11 am

In New Hampshire, where the state motto is "Live Free Or Die," college students don't take kindly to restrictions on their energy drinks.

After the food services folks at the University of New Hampshire moved to ban energy drinks as part of the school's drive to become the "healthiest campus community in the country by 2020," the president stepped in to reverse the decision.

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The Two-Way
10:59 am
Fri September 30, 2011

Ron Paul Condemns Al-Awlaki's Killing

U.S. Rep. Ron Paul (R-TX).
Ethan Miller Getty Images

GOP presidential candidate Ron Paul had some tough words for President Obama over what he said was the assassination of Anwar al-Awlaki.

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The Salt
10:49 am
Fri September 30, 2011

Vilsack: Not Done With Potatoes And School Lunch

Would your kids eat potatoes if they looked like this?
Robyn Mackenzie iStockphoto.com

Recently, The Salt had a chance to chat with Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack. He's held the top post at USDA since January 2009. As a former Iowa governor, he knows a thing or two about farm country and he's been open about his struggles with weight.

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The Two-Way
10:45 am
Fri September 30, 2011

Bank Of America Is 'Sticking It' To Customers, Senator Says

A customer uses a Bank of America ATM in Los Angeles. The bank plans to start charging a $5 monthly fee for customers who use their debit card for purchases starting early in 2012. ATM transactions would still be free.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

There's no doubt how the No. 2 Democrat in the Senate feels about Bank of America's plan to charge most of its debit card users $5 a month if they use the cards to make purchases. Sen. Dick Durbin (D-IL) has issued a statement that reads, in part:

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National Security
10:25 am
Fri September 30, 2011

Awlaki: From San Diego Cleric To Wanted Terrorist

U.S.-born cleric Anwar al-Awlaki was killed Friday in a U.S. airstrike in Yemen. U.S. officials say he was linked to several major terrorist plots in recent years.
Anonymous AP

Originally published on Fri September 30, 2011 5:13 pm

Anwar al-Awlaki was born in New Mexico, educated in Colorado and spent years as a cleric in San Diego and suburban Washington, D.C. But in the past several years, he became a master al-Qaida propagandist whose sermons inspired jihadists worldwide before his death Friday by a U.S. missile on a desert road in northern Yemen.

Awlaki's journey from a childhood in Las Cruces, N.M., to the Arabian Peninsula placed him in the cross hairs of U.S. intelligence after he was linked to the failed "underwear bomber," the Fort Hood shooter and the foiled plot to bomb New York's Times Square.

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Life In Retirement: The Not-So-Golden Years
9:25 am
Fri September 30, 2011

Facebook Fans Share Their Plans For Retirement

NPR's Facebook fans weigh in on how (and whether) they plan to retire.
iStockphoto.com

How are you preparing for retirement? If you're already retired, what kind of changes have you had to make? Do you think you'll ever be able to afford to retire?

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