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Africa
3:22 am
Sat October 8, 2011

Dalai Lama's Absence Looms Large At Tutu's Birthday

Children help retired Archbishop Desmond Tutu blow out candles on a cake during a celebration of his 80th birthday in Stellenbosch, South Africa, on Friday.

Rodger Bosch AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat October 8, 2011 9:20 pm

In downtown Cape Town, worshippers gathered Friday for a morning Mass at St. George's Cathedral. During apartheid, the massive stone church was an epicenter of resistance against the South African government. On Friday, a service was held to honor the man who led that resistance, Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu.

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National Security
11:00 pm
Fri October 7, 2011

Veterans, Civilians Don't See Eye To Eye On War

Saturday begins the 11th year in the war in Afghanistan, and a new poll shows that veterans and the general public have different views on war, the value of military service β€” and even patriotism.

David Gilkey NPR

Veterans and the general public have different views on the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the value of military service, and even the subject of patriotism, according to a new survey by the Pew Research Center.

The United States has never seen a moment like this one, the Pew Center says. Sustained combat for a decade, and a small fraction of American men and women in uniform.

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The Two-Way
6:06 pm
Fri October 7, 2011

Looking Into The Galaxy's Heart (It's Red)

This infrared mosaic image, taken by the Hubble telescope, represents the "sharpest survey of the Galactic Center to date," NASA says.

NASA

For its popular "photo of the day" feature, NASA gives us a look at the center of the galaxy, in the form of an infrared image β€” because as I'm sure you already know, infrared can penetrate the dust clouds that obscure the core in the visible spectrum.

This is the area that NASA uses to form ideas about how massive stars are formed, and how they influence other objects.

The image above, taken by the Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer, has a "false color," NASA says, in order to show "the glow of hot hydrogen in space."

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The Two-Way
4:52 pm
Fri October 7, 2011

U.S. Drone Controllers Said To Be Infected By Computer Virus

Some of the computers controlling America's fleet of drone aircraft are reportedly infected by a persistent virus. In this file photo, a senior airman remotely operates an MQ-9 Reaper during a training mission at Creech Air Force Base in Indian Springs, Nev.

Ethan Miller Getty Images

Let's say you have people using computers to control unmanned aircraft that are useful for both gathering information and destroying targets on other continents. If you had a choice, those would probably not be the computers you'd like to see infected by a virus β€” but that's what has happened to some U.S. systems that control Predator and Reaper drones, according to Wired's Danger Room blog.

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Shots - Health Blog
4:13 pm
Fri October 7, 2011

Feds Crack The Whip On California Marijuana Shops

In July, protesters rally inΓ‚ San Francisco against a Drug Enforcement Agency memo they believed would lead to prosecution of individuals in compliance with California medical marijuana laws.Γ‚

Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Cue Tom Petty because this could be California's last (legal) dance with Mary Jane.

Federal prosecutors turned up the heat on owners of medical-marijuana dispensaries in California by issuing them a 45-day deadline to shut down their shops or face criminal charges or seizure of assets. The crackdown, announced Friday in Sacramento, Calif., comes 15 years after the Golden State started allowing marijuana as a doctor-prescribed treatment for a variety of illnesses.

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Shots - Health Blog
3:44 pm
Fri October 7, 2011

Impotence Drug Approved To Treat Enlarged Prostate Symptoms

The FDA says the same pill can be used to treat BPH and erectile dysfunction.

Eli Lilly

In other men's health news today, the Food and Drug Administration approved the use of Cialis as a once-a-day treatment for symptoms caused by an enlarged prostate.

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The Two-Way
3:40 pm
Fri October 7, 2011

1985 Chicago Bears Finally Get Their Due With White House Visit

President Barack Obama shakes hands with former Chicago Bears quarterback Jim McMahon as he hosts the 1985 Chicago Bears football team at the White House. The visit was a make-up trip for the Super Bowl XX champions, whose original reception was cancelled in 1986.

Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Fri October 7, 2011 4:54 pm

The 1985 Chicago Bears team finished a dream season by winning the Super Bowl, 46-10, over the New England Patriots. But unlike recent championship teams, the Bears didn't make it to the White House β€” their trip was pre-empted by the Challenger shuttle disaster, which occurred on Jan. 28, 1986, two days after Super Bowl XX.

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Mitt Romney
3:09 pm
Fri October 7, 2011

Romney Calls For A Bigger, Stronger Military

Republican presidential hopeful Mitt Romney speaks to Citadel cadets and supporters on campus Friday in Charleston, S.C. The former Massachusetts governor, known more for his business acumen than his foreign-policy experience, sought to show he has what it takes to be commander in chief.

Mic Smith AP

There is a tradition of Republican presidential candidates laying out their foreign-policy views at The Citadel.

John McCain did it four years ago; George W. Bush did it eight years before that. On Friday, it was Mitt Romney's turn to speak at the South Carolina military academy.

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Afghanistan
3:06 pm
Fri October 7, 2011

In Afghanistan, Performance Artist Packs Up His Bling

Aman Mojedidi, who grew up in Jacksonville, Fla., moved to Afghanistan in 2003 because he thought his homeland was finally on the mend. The guerrilla artist is also known as the Jihadi Gangsta, and he has provoked controversy and laughter with his work.

Courtesy of Aman Mojedidi

Performance artist Aman Mojedidi moved from the U.S. to Afghanistan in 2003, as one of what he says were many Afghan-Americans and Afghan-Europeans who thought their homeland was finally on the mend.

"It was really part of that wave of hyphenated Afghans and internationals wanting to come to Afghanistan, post-Taliban, [to] do something, rebuild, reconstruct, that kind of thing," he says.

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World
2:37 pm
Fri October 7, 2011

Battles Against Oppressive Regimes Led To Nobel

The Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to three women on Friday. From left: President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf of Liberia, Liberian "peace warrior" Leymah Gbowee and Tawakkul Karman of Yemen.

AP

Originally published on Fri October 7, 2011 4:58 pm

The three women who won the 2011 Nobel Peace Prize were lauded for their courage in standing up to the violence and brutality of oppressive regimes in Liberia and Yemen.

The five-member Nobel Committee in Norway announced Friday that it would split the coveted award three ways, honoring Africa's first democratically elected female president, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf; Liberian campaigner Leymah Gbowee; and Yemeni democracy activist Tawakkul Karman.

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