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Economy
3:34 am
Fri October 28, 2011

The Rising Cost Of Doing Business With Greece

Greek's economic problems work their way down the supply chain to people like Kosta Bouyoukas, who imports olives and other foods from Greece. He says suppliers are changing the terms of contracts, and sometimes products don't show up at all.

Helga Csenki iStockphoto.com

As details of the Greek debt deal passed by the European Union Wednesday are worked out, some businesses in the U.S. continue to grapple with the ripple effects of the prolonged debt crisis.

The EU hopes the debt deal will contain Europe's debt problems, and the problem countries will now start their work of implementing fiscal reforms — which has proved troublesome, especially in Greece.

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Politics
3:20 am
Fri October 28, 2011

New York Wrestles Over Extending Millionaires Tax

The so-called millionaires tax on New York's top wage earners is set to expire at the end of the year, even as the state struggles to balance its books. A poll released Thursday shows that New Yorkers favor extending the tax by more than 2 to 1.

But the millionaires tax also has its opponents, including the state's popular and powerful governor, Democrat Andrew Cuomo.

John Samuelsen, president of New York City's transit workers union, called on lawmakers to extend the millionaires tax during a rally this week outside City Hall in Manhattan.

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Europe
3:00 am
Fri October 28, 2011

Sarkozy Warns France Of More Belt-Tightening Ahead

Originally published on Fri October 28, 2011 7:48 am

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, host: And, of course, this crisis stretches far beyond Greece. French President Nicolas Sarkozy went on national television last night to explain his country's part of the deal. He said the French people must expect further belt-tightening measures. Eleanor Beardsley reports that it was a chance for Sarkozy to assert control just six months ahead of a presidential election.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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U.S.
3:00 am
Fri October 28, 2011

Occupy Violence Reignites Criticism Of Oakland Police

Originally published on Fri October 28, 2011 7:48 am

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, host: This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Ari Shapiro. Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep are away. In Oakland, California, protestors with the Occupy Wall Street movement continue to stand vigil in a downtown plaza in front of City Hall. This week, police fired teargas and bean bags at protestors. The incident is under investigation, and NPR's Carrie Kahn reports that the confrontation has reignited criticism of the Oakland police.

CARRIE KAHN: In the downtown park in front of City Hall, the protestors have changed their tune.

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Sports
3:00 am
Fri October 28, 2011

Game 6 A Hero-Maker For St. Louis

The St. Louis Cardinals came from behind twice to beat the Texas Rangers 10-to-9 last night, forcing the World Series to Game 7.

World
3:00 am
Fri October 28, 2011

Global Markets Rally After EU Leaders Set Debt Plan

U.S. stocks had one of their best days in weeks Thursday: The Dow jumped nearly 3 percent and prices in Europe went through the roof. The surge came after the announcement that European leaders finally agreed on a comprehensive plan to tackle their debt problems. Does the rally mean investors think the crisis is over?

World
3:00 am
Fri October 28, 2011

Prince's Death Reveals Saudi Succession Issues

Ari Shapiro talks to Thomas Lippman, a scholar at the Middle East Institute, about the successor to the crown prince in Saudi Arabia and the complex Saudi royal family. The crown prince — heir apparent to the throne — died last weekend, and a new one has been appointed by King Abdullah: the king's 78-year-old half-brother.

The Two-Way
5:25 pm
Thu October 27, 2011

Report: Fukushima Released More Radioactive Material Than Japan Estimated

Originally published on Fri October 28, 2011 6:18 am

An unpublished study by European scientists has found that the crippled Fukushima nuclear power plant may have released much more radioactive active material than the Japanese government estimated.

NPR's Richard Harris filed this report for the Newscast unit:

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The Salt
5:03 pm
Thu October 27, 2011

Crop Insurance: A Pricey 'Safety Net' For Farmers

Illinois farmers harvest corn crops near Monticello, Ill. An unseasonably hot summer likely damaged much of this year's corn crop, which means farmers may seek support through their crop insurance.

Seth Perlman AP

Originally published on Fri October 28, 2011 1:36 pm

Farming nowadays is risky business — it's not uncommon for a farmer to invest $500,000 in 1,000 acres of corn or soybeans, and run the risk of losing a chunk of their income to pests or fickle weather events like droughts and floods.

That's why farmers say crop insurance is "the most important safety net program" for them, says Joe Glauber, chief economist of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

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The Two-Way
4:55 pm
Thu October 27, 2011

Saudi King Names 78-Year-Old Nayef Bin Abdulaziz His Successor

Prince Nayef bin Abdul Aziz al-Saud waving before delivering a speech at the Shura (consultative) Council in Riyadh in 2007.

Hassa Ammar AFP/Getty Images

As expected, King Abdullah of Egypt has appointed his half-brother, 78-year-old Nayef bin Abdulaziz, crown prince. The news comes, after the heir to the throne, Crown Prince Sultan bin Abdel Aziz Al Saud died on Saturday.

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