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The Salt
9:18 am
Wed November 9, 2011

Giving Mini Burgers To Mice Reveals The Good And Bad Of Cooking Meat

Cooked meat may be humans' most efficient energy source.
Istockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed November 9, 2011 2:19 pm

Ah, to be a Harvard laboratory mouse. The pay stinks, but the food is delish! Researchers at the venerable school have been serving lab mice tiny organic burgers made with meat from Savenor's Market, where Julia Child bought her steaks.

"It came out looking like a beautiful little mini hamburger," says Rachel Carmody, a graduate student in evolutionary biology at Harvard who cooked up the mini-burgers in Petri dishes.

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The Two-Way
8:20 am
Wed November 9, 2011

Top Stories: Cain Allegations, Penn State Scandal, 2011 Elections

Originally published on Wed November 9, 2011 8:37 am

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The Two-Way
8:09 am
Wed November 9, 2011

Cain Accuser Says She Didn't Want Controversy

Cain accuser and longtime government employee Karen Kraushaar once worked as a spokesperson for the Immigration and Naturalization Service. She offered a statement after meeting with the Miami family of Elian Gonzalez in March of 2000.
Miami Herald Getty Images

A few of the developments since our last post about the sexual harassment allegations against Republican presidential candidate Herman Cain — who calls them "false, anonymous, incorrect accusations":

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The Two-Way
7:15 am
Wed November 9, 2011

Penn State Scandal: Trustees' Support For Paterno Said To Be 'Eroding'

Scott Paterno, left, greeted his father — Penn State football coach Joe Paterno — as the coach arrived at his home, Tuesday evening in State College, Pa. Hundreds of students had gathered to show support for the coach.
Matt Rourke AP

Originally published on Wed November 9, 2011 7:27 am

Catching up on some of the latest developments in the scandal at Penn State University — where former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky has been charged with sexually abusing young boys, two university officials have been charged with lying to a grand jury and not alerting police, and there have been calls for legendary coach Joe Paterno to step down because of concern that he didn't do enough to alert authorities to what was allegedly happening:

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The Two-Way
6:40 am
Wed November 9, 2011

2011 Election Results: Mixed Messages

Voter stickers at a polling station Tuesday in San Francisco.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

As news outlets try to decipher what Tuesday's election results tell us about what voters are thinking, they're reaching various conclusions.

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Politics
5:30 am
Wed November 9, 2011

Political Math: Social Security Cuts Don't Add Up

Judy Moses, 71, prepares to be arrested during an Occupy Chicago protest against cuts to federal safety net programs, including Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid, on Monday.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Conservative activists in the Tea Party want Congress to cut government budget deficits. At the same time, liberal protesters in the Occupy Wall Street movement want lawmakers to reduce wealth inequality.

Both goals could be achieved by doing one thing: reducing Social Security payments to retirees, the wealthiest demographic group in the country.

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Hard Times: A Journey Across America
4:00 am
Wed November 9, 2011

Alabama's 'Rocket City' Hopes For Another Boom

In 1962, President John Kennedy (center) and Vice President Lyndon Johnson visited Dr. Wernher von Braun (left), who designed the Saturn rocket in Huntsville, Ala.
AP

Originally published on Fri November 11, 2011 7:40 am

Part of a monthlong series

Driving into Huntsville, Ala., it's clear what this city is all about: A giant Saturn V rocket looms ahead in the skyline. This is the city that made the Saturn rockets that took the Apollo astronauts to the moon.

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Politics
3:08 am
Wed November 9, 2011

Mississippi Voters Reject 'Personhood' Measure

Adam and Debbie Browne tried to drum up support Tuesday for a proposed 'personhood' amendment to the Mississippi state constitution that was ultimately rejected by voters.
Rogelio V. Solis AP

Originally published on Thu November 10, 2011 7:44 am

Mississippi voters on Tuesday rejected an amendment to their state constitution that would have declared that life begins at fertilization.

The result was somewhat unexpected: As recently as a few weeks ago, the so-called personhood amendment was considered almost certain to pass. Voters in Colorado have twice rejected similar amendments to declare that life begins legally at fertilization, in 2008 and 2010. But Mississippi, with its far more conservative bent, was considered much friendlier territory.

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Politics
3:03 am
Wed November 9, 2011

Ohio Voters Repeal Collective Bargaining Law

Originally published on Thu November 10, 2011 7:44 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. Good morning. We're at the point of the election cycle sometimes called the off-off year. Not many offices were up for grabs but yesterday, some high-profile measures were on state ballots.

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Business
11:01 pm
Tue November 8, 2011

Biofuels Start To Take Off In The Airline Industry

Employees load bags onto a Boeing 737-800 running on algae-based biofuel in Houston. Continental (owned by United Continental Holdings Inc.) flew the nation's first passenger jet powered by biofuels on Monday.
Aaron M. Sprecher Getty Images

This week, two U.S. airlines will be flying passengers on flights powered by biofuels for the first time. On Monday a Continental flight from Houston to Chicago used a biofuel blend made in part from algae, and Wednesday Alaska Airlines is set to fly passengers using a fuel made in part from cooking oil.

If all goes well, more airlines may start to use alternative jet fuels. But the shift is not without its challenges.

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