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All Tech Considered
4:04 pm
Mon April 23, 2012

Arab Tech Startups Try To Seize The Moment

The political changes brought about by the Arab Spring have raised hopes among high-tech entrepreneurs that this will translate into an improved business climate. Here, budding entrepreneurs work at Oasis 500, a seed investment firm in Amman, Jordan, on Nov. 2, 2011.
Muhammad Hamed Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 6:39 pm

Social networking sites have been at the vanguard of the Arab uprisings over the past year. Egyptians used online pages to organize protests, and Syrian activists have posted frequent YouTube videos showing government forces shelling civilian areas.

The same growing Arab online awareness that made the Internet part of the pro-democracy movements has also created a mini-revolution for Arab technological business.

Due to regulation, limited infrastructure and governments wary of the Internet, the Middle East has not been the easiest place to launch a tech startup.

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The Salt
4:04 pm
Mon April 23, 2012

The California Taco Trail: 'How Mexican Food Conquered America'

Cielito Lindo's famous taquitos are made fresh to order at the well-known taco stand in downtown Los Angeles.
Carolina Miranda NPR

Originally published on Tue April 24, 2012 6:23 am

For 50 years, the taco has been a staple of American life. It's in school lunches and Michelin-star restaurants. It even helped launch the food truck craze. So how did the taco come to loom so large in American bellies?

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Around the Nation
4:04 pm
Mon April 23, 2012

President Obama Takes Steps To End Mass Atrocities

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 6:39 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

President Obama toured the U.S. Holocaust Museum in Washington today joined by Holocaust survivor, author and Nobel Laureate, Elie Wiesel. Mr. Obama said the U.S. must never again allow such atrocities to take place.

As NPR's Don Gonyea reports, the president also announced new tools to punish countries that use technology to track and target their citizens.

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Concerts
3:53 pm
Mon April 23, 2012

Carnegie Hall Live: Pavel Haas Quartet

The Pavel Haas Quartet live at Carnegie Hall's Weill Recital Hall on April 27, 2012.
Melanie Burford for NPR

Originally published on Tue April 15, 2014 2:48 pm

PROGRAM

  • Tchaikovsky: String Quartet No. 1 in D Major, Op. 1
  • Shostakovich: String Quartet No. 7 in F-sharp minor, Op. 108
  • Smetana: String Quartet No. 1 in E minor, "From My Life"

If you haven't yet heard the Pavel Haas Quartet, buckle your seat belt. This smart, incisive group from Prague with an ultra-warm sound and a sure sense of rhythmic play has been collecting accolades by the fistful ever since they burst onto the international scene six years ago.

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The Two-Way
3:49 pm
Mon April 23, 2012

Report: Immigration From Mexico To U.S. Comes To Standstill

Pew

The historic wave of migration from Mexico to the United States, which over four decades brought 12 million immigrants to the country, has come to a standstill. That's what a new Pew Hispanic Center study released today found.

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The Record
3:41 pm
Mon April 23, 2012

Remembering Bert Weedon, Guitar Teacher To Rock Stars (And Many More)

British guitarist Bert Weedon died Friday at age 91.
Keystone Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 6:39 pm

Even if you've never heard the name Bert Weedon before, his death on Friday, at the age of 91, deserves a salute: a chiming, perfectly fingered D major chord salute.

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NPR Story
3:41 pm
Mon April 23, 2012

Murdochs, News Corp Face Big Week Of Investigations

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 6:39 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED.

In Britain, the allegations keep coming of illegal behavior by Rupert Murdoch's News Corporation. Today, an investigation was announced into email hacking by Sky News. News Corp's British operations already stand accused of phone hacking, along with bribing police officers.

As NPR's David Folkenflik reports, the new investigation comes just before Murdoch is scheduled to testify on the sandal.

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Shots - Health Blog
3:16 pm
Mon April 23, 2012

Cancer Doc Brawley Says The U.S. Health System Is Sick

Otis Brawley, M.D., chief medical officer of the American Cancer Society.
Chris Hamilton American Cancer Society

Originally published on Fri April 27, 2012 8:48 am

Journalists make for a pretty tough crowd.

But Dr. Otis Brawley, chief medical officer for the American Cancer Society, fired up hundreds of them at the annual meeting of Association of Health Care Journalists over the weekend with a no-holds-barred critique of the U.S. health system.

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The Salt
3:15 pm
Mon April 23, 2012

Are Local Salad Greens Safer Than Packaged Salad Greens?

Miller Farms in Maryland is a family-run operation that sells its home-grown vegetables at farmers' markets and local grocery stores. Phil Miller, whose family owns the farm, says he's trying to earn a food safety certification now required by many food buyers.
Maggie Starbard NPR

Originally published on Tue April 24, 2012 6:23 am

There were lots of comments on this blog regarding my recent stories about making salads safer. Many of those comments argued that the solution is to grow your own. Or at least buy from local farmers.

Which raises an interesting question: Are salad greens from your local farmer's market actually safer than packaged lettuce from thousands of miles away? And should the same safety rules apply to both?

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History
3:13 pm
Mon April 23, 2012

Discovery Sparks Interest In Forgotten Black Scholar

Three years ago, Rufus McDonald found historic documents in an abandoned house and took them to a rare-books dealer. The papers and books belonged to Richard T. Greener, a 19th century intellectual who was the first African-American to graduate from Harvard University.
Cheryl Corley NPR

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 6:39 pm

Three years ago, just moments before sledgehammers ripped through an abandoned home in Chicago, the head of a demolition crew decided to save the contents of an old steamer trunk stored in the attic.

"They were about to demolish it because they couldn't get it down the stairs," says Rufus McDonald, who gathered what was inside the steamer trunk — documents and old books — and took them to a rare-book dealer in Chicago.

"He said, 'Do you know who this is?' I said, 'Nah, who is it?' He said, 'It's Richard Theodore Greener," McDonald recalls. "I said, 'Who is he?' "

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