Latest Information:

NPR National News

Pages

Home Front: Soldiers Learn To Live After War
4:42 am
Sun June 17, 2012

Frontlines Of Fatherhood: Catching Up After War

Sgt. Michael Clark and his fiancee, Kaitlin Forant, hold their son, Michael Clark Jr. It took time for the 18-month-old to recognize his father after Clark's deployment.
Tom Dreisbach NPR

Originally published on Sun June 17, 2012 6:58 pm

Last year, members of the 182nd National Guard regiment marked Father's Day far away from their loved ones. This year, they're home with their kids after a year in Afghanistan.

Spc. Bryan Tolley, 29, knows the challenges of being both a soldier and a dad. His son, Ryan, is a shy, blond 18-month-old who happily clings to his dad.

"Seeing his face light up when he sees Dada come through his bedroom door instead of Mama — because he's so used to his mother — it's awesome. I love it," says Tolley of Plymouth, Mass.

Read more
Presidential Race
4:41 am
Sun June 17, 2012

Raucous Iowa Convention May Signal What's To Come

Originally published on Mon June 18, 2012 12:10 pm

You know things are going badly when the person at the front of the room has to say, "This is not going well." The fireworks at Iowa's Republican State Convention began even before lunchtime Saturday. At one point during the day, the parliamentarian threatened to kick out the next person who tried to speak out of order.

If Saturday's convention is any indication, Mitt Romney may not be in for smooth sailing at this summer's national convention in Florida.

Read more
The Checkout: Live
1:09 am
Sun June 17, 2012

Clarence Penn Quartet: Live From 92Y Tribeca

Clarence Penn.
John Rogers for NPR johnrogersnyc.com

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 8:22 am

Clarence Penn is one of those jazz-trained drummers who prove too versatile, too accomplished, too good to have too much free time. He joined Ellis Marsalis' band when he was still in college; he's another graduate of Betty Carter finishing school. Since then, he's stayed busy touring with anyone and everyone — perhaps too busy to have put out a record of his own since 2002. That hopefully changes this year with the release of Dalí In Cobble Hill, an album of original music for quartet; we'll get a preview at the 92Y Tribeca.

Read more
The Checkout: Live
1:08 am
Sun June 17, 2012

Antonio Sanchez And Migration: Live From 92Y Tribeca

Antonio Sanchez.
John Rogers for NPR johnrogersnyc.com

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 8:15 am

After moving from Mexico City to the U.S. to study jazz, it didn't take drummer Antonio Sánchez long to find himself in the bands of international stars — folks like Pat Metheny, or Michael Brecker, or Chick Corea. It's easy to see why he's so busy; five minutes of watching him layer on polyrhythms will suffice. But he's got more than one talent: He also has a degree in classical piano, and has made a few records which show off his composing, starting with 2007's Migration.

Read more
Around the Nation
4:30 pm
Sat June 16, 2012

State Of The Unions: Labor And The Middle Class

Occupy Wall Street protesters joined with unions in New York on May 1, a traditional day of global protests in sympathy with unions and leftist politics.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Sat June 16, 2012 8:05 pm

For many full-time employees in the United States, the five-day work week, paid overtime and holidays are expected benefits. This wasn't always so, and many workers' benefits today are the achievements of labor unions.

Just five decades ago, unions were on the frontline of the fight for the rights and wages of the middle class. But today, unions are on the decline.

Read more
NPR Story
4:24 pm
Sat June 16, 2012

Gauging The Impact Of Obama's Immigration Policy

President Obama announced major changes in the country's immigration policy on Friday. NPR's Mara Liasson talks with weekends on All Things Considered host Jacki Lyden about what the changes are and the political impact they may have this election season.

Arts & Life
3:23 pm
Sat June 16, 2012

Embracing The Quirkiness Of Djuna Barnes

Before publishing the plays and novels she's now known for, women's rights advocate Djuna Barnes was a journalist and illustrator.
Djuna Barnes Papers, Special Collections, University of Maryland Libraries

Originally published on Sat June 16, 2012 6:06 pm

A writer, illustrator and provocateur in the Roaring '20s, Djuna Barnes stood out.

"She was much more interested in embracing the quirky and embracing that idea that became so famous in feminist circles half a century later," Catherine Morris says, "the idea that the personal is political."

Morris is the curator of a new exhibition of Barnes' writings and illustrations called "Newspaper Fictions" at the Brooklyn Museum's Sackler Center for Feminist Art.

Read more
Music Interviews
3:03 pm
Sat June 16, 2012

One Father, Eight Sons, Nine Shiny Brass Bells

The Hypnotic Brass Ensemble features eight of trumpeter Kelan Phil Cohran's sons.
Georgia Khun

Originally published on Tue November 27, 2012 2:52 pm

Over the course of 85-year-old Kelan Phil Cohran's long career as an avant-garde jazz trumpeter, he's toured the world, performing with everyone from Sun Ra to Sarah Vaughan.

When not on the road, Cohran has worked as a music educator, teaching music in schools and prisons, and to his own children.

Read more
Kee Facts: A Few Things You Didn't Know
11:15 am
Sat June 16, 2012

Follow The Money: On The Trail Of Watergate Lore

A photograph of the Watergate complex that was used as an exhibit in the trial of G. Gordon Liddy.
National Archives

"Follow the money" – a phrase that's now part of our national lexicon — was supposedly whispered to reporter Bob Woodward by Deep Throat as a way to cut through the lies and deceptions and find the truth about the Watergate scandal. The so-called third-rate burglary that happened 40 years ago this weekend ended the presidency of Richard Nixon. But did Mark Felt, the former associate director of the FBI who admitted to being Deep Throat in 2005, ever really say "follow the money"?

He did not.

Read more
Music Interviews
11:03 am
Sat June 16, 2012

Bonnie Raitt: A Brand-New Model For A Classic Sound

Bonnie Raitt's latest album, Slipstream, is the first release on her own Redwing Records label.
Marina Chavez

Originally published on Sat June 16, 2012 4:24 pm

This April, roots-rock singer-guitarist Bonnie Raitt released her first album in seven years, Slipstream. It's classic Raitt, mixing bluesy slide-guitar riffs with her soulful voice and a pop-friendly sensibility.

The delivery system, however, is brand-new. After years of working with the majors, Raitt decided to start her own label, Redwing Records. Raitt runs Redwing with the help of a tiny staff; Slipstream is the first release in its catalog.

Read more

Pages