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Shots - Health Blog
1:22 pm
Tue August 14, 2012

Family's Fight Against Bipolar Disorder Leads To Shock Therapy Success

Linea Johnson, left, and her mother, Cinda, in May 2012 at the launch of their book on the family's struggle with Linea's bipolar disorder.
Tommy Voeten

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 1:56 pm

The Mayo Clinic's confirmation Monday that Congressman Jesse Jackson Jr. is receiving care there for bipolar depression is a reminder that the condition, which affects around 2.3 million Americans, can be treated.

But figuring out the right treatment for each patient can be a long and difficult road, as a new memoir called Perfect Chaos: A Daughter's Journey to Survive Bipolar, a Mother's Struggle to Save Her shows.

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From Our Listeners
1:21 pm
Tue August 14, 2012

Letters: Doctor Shortage, Studying Abroad

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 2:47 pm

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

It's Tuesday and time to read from your comments.

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The Two-Way
1:10 pm
Tue August 14, 2012

Actor Ron Palillo Dies, He Was Horshack On 'Welcome Back, Kotter'

Actor Ron Palillo, best known as Arnold Horshack.
Todd Williamson Getty Images for TV Land

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 1:40 pm

"Ooh, Ooh, Ooh, Mr. Kotter!"

If you watched TV in the '70s, you probably recognize that line.

So it's with some sadness that we pass along word that Ron Palillo, the actor who played Arnold Horshack on ABC-TV's Welcome Back, Kotter, has died in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla.

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Around the Nation
1:10 pm
Tue August 14, 2012

The Anatomy Of A Hate Group

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 2:47 pm

The murders of six people at the Sikh temple in Oak Creek, Wis., by a gunman with ties to white supremacists has raised questions about the prevalence and influence of hate groups in America — who they are, what they do, and how they recruit new members.

Around the Nation
1:04 pm
Tue August 14, 2012

Tammy Smith: First Openly Gay U.S. General

Army Brigadier General Tammy Smith, right, with her wife, Tracey Hepner.
Servicemembers Legal Defense Network

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 2:47 pm

Army Reserve officer Tammy Smith was promoted to the position of Brigadier General on August 10, 2012. In doing so, she became the first gay general to serve openly in the U.S. military.

"I'm just so thrilled that I'm able at this point to present Tracy as my family," she tells NPR's Lynn Neary. "We're indeed a military family."

Gen. Smith talks about her career in the military and the significance of her recent promotion.

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NPR Story
1:04 pm
Tue August 14, 2012

What Life Holds For Athletes After The Olympics

American swimmer Carrie Steinseifer, left, hugs Nancy Hogshead after they tied for the gold medal in the 100 meter freestyle competition during the 1984 Olympics.
Courtesy of Nancy Hogshead-Makar

Originally published on Wed August 15, 2012 3:14 pm

As a kid, Nancy Hogshead-Makar wanted to be the best swimmer in the world. At 14, she got her wish when she was ranked number one in the world for 200-meter butterfly at age 14. Four years later, she was part of U.S. team that boycotted the Moscow Olympics, and at 22, she swam in five Olympic finals at the 1984 Los Angeles games, winning three gold medals and one silver medal.

"I knew that the 1984 Olympics were really going to be my swan song," she tells NPR's Lynn Neary. She retired after those games and went to finish out a year and a half at Duke University.

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The Two-Way
12:54 pm
Tue August 14, 2012

Leader Of Anti-Semitic Party In Hungary Discovers He's Jewish

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 3:11 pm

There's a story out of Hungary that has received quite a bit of play from the religious press but hadn't quite risen to the mainstream until the AP ran a piece about it today.

It's quite dramatic with an incredible plot twist: One of the leaders of Hungary's Jobbik Party, which the Anti-Defamation League says is one of the few political parties in Europe to overtly campaign with anti-Semitic materials, has discovered that he is himself a Jew.

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Author Interviews
12:03 pm
Tue August 14, 2012

Climate 'Weirdness' Throws Ecosystems 'Out Of Kilter'

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the past year through June 2012 has been the hottest year in the continental U.S. since modern record-keeping started in 1895. Above, New Yorkers flocked to Coney Island to try to beat the heat in early August.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 12:47 pm

Science journalist Michael Lemonick doesn't want to be a doomsday prophet, but he does want to be realistic about the threat of climate change. "Since I started writing about climate change all the way back in 1987, we've known what the cause is, we've known what the likely outcome is, and we've had time to act — and essentially we haven't acted," he tells Fresh Air's Dave Davies.

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The Two-Way
12:01 pm
Tue August 14, 2012

Multiple Suicide Attacks Cause Double-Digit Death Toll In Afghanistan

Suicide bombers struck in a normally peaceful area of southwestern Afghanistan today.

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Deceptive Cadence
11:54 am
Tue August 14, 2012

Making A Case For Massenet, The Misunderstood Sentimentalist

French composer Jules Massenet died 100 years ago, leaving the opera world with a wealth of elegantly composed dramas.
Topical Press Agency Getty Images

Originally published on Thu August 16, 2012 10:07 am

Poor Jules Massenet. How could the most successful French opera composer of his generation fall so far out of fashion? Perhaps the new 23-CD box set of Massenet's music, marking the 100th anniversary of his death (yesterday), holds some clues.

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