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Mountain Stage
1:10 pm
Fri October 12, 2012

Pat Fitzgerald & Robin Dale Ford On Mountain Stage

Todd Paris Mountain Stage

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 8:55 am

Pat Fitzgerald and Robin Dale Ford make their first appearance on Mountain Stage, recorded live on the campus of the University of Alaska at Fairbanks. The two have worked together and separately for more than 20 years, in the process becoming an integral part of Alaska's unique musical landscape, where rock and acoustic music often find common ground.

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Shots - Health Blog
12:58 pm
Fri October 12, 2012

Classroom Yoga Helps Improve Behavior Of Kids With Autism

Yoga is increasingly being used in classrooms across the U.S. to help kids behave and perform better in school.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri October 12, 2012 1:48 pm

Researchers have found that kids with autism spectrum disorder who did yoga at their elementary school behaved better than kids with autism who weren't doing yoga.

The researchers surveyed teachers at a school in the Bronx who said a daily yoga program reduced the kids' aggressive behavior, social withdrawal and hyperactivity.

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Technology
12:45 pm
Fri October 12, 2012

Fifty Years Ago, A Bright Idea

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. Fifty years ago this week, a team of researchers at General Electric created something new: a solid-state device that could emit visible red light without getting hot like a light bulb. Other groups have made light-emitting devices, but this was the first practical one that could make light that a person could see, rather than invisible infrared light.

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Science
12:44 pm
Fri October 12, 2012

Prehistoric 'Kennewick Man' Was All Beefcake

Forensic artists think this is what Kennewick Man looked like.
Brittney Tatchell Courtesy of Doug Owsley

Originally published on Fri October 12, 2012 6:41 pm

For nearly a decade, scientists and Northwest tribes in Washington state fought bitterly over whether to bury or study the 9,500-year-old bones known as Kennewick Man. Scientists won the battle, and now, after years of careful examination, they're releasing some of their findings.

For starters, Kennewick Man was buff. I mean, really beefcake. So says Doug Owsley, head of physical anthropology at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History, and the man who led the study of the ancient remains.

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It's All Politics
12:44 pm
Fri October 12, 2012

7 Signals Stolen From The Running Mates' One-Game Playoff

Vice President Biden and Republican Paul Ryan at Thursday night's debate.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 12, 2012 1:59 pm

You may have noticed that the vice presidential debate took place on the same day as four crucial games in this year's baseball playoffs. In case you were distracted at all by the latter, here's some of what you may have missed:

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The Two-Way
12:40 pm
Fri October 12, 2012

Remembering Andrew Brimmer, First Black On Federal Reserve's Board

Andrew Brimmer in 1970, when he was a Federal Reserve Board governor.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

A life well-worth noting has caught the attention of obituary writers:

-- "Andrew F. Brimmer, a Louisiana sharecropper's son who was the first black member of the Federal Reserve Board and who led efforts to to reverse the country's balance-of-payments deficit, died on Sunday in Washington. He was 86." (The New York Times)

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The Two-Way
12:13 pm
Fri October 12, 2012

Fidel Castro 'Is Fine,' His Son Tells State-Friendly Blogger

A visitor watches pictures taken by Cuban photographer and cinematographist Alex Castro, son of former Cuban president Fidel Castro.
Alfredo Estrella AFP/Getty Images

Fidel Castro's son, Alex Castro, is batting away rumors that his father, the former leader of Cuba, had died.

"The commander is fine, doing his daily things, reading, exercising," Alex Castro said.

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Science
12:03 pm
Fri October 12, 2012

2012 Nobel Prizes Recognize Pioneering Science

Originally published on Fri October 12, 2012 12:45 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY; I'm Ira Flatow. The 2012 Nobel Prizes were announced this week in Stockholm, and groundbreaking research on stem cells, cloning, cell receptors and quantum optics, yeah, claimed the honors this year. The physics prize was awarded to French physicist Serge Haroche and American David Wineland of the National Institute of Standards and Technology and the University of Colorado.

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The Two-Way
11:50 am
Fri October 12, 2012

What's All This Malarkey About Malarkey?

Vice President Biden thought much of what his opponent said Thursday night was malarkey, and his face often showed what he was thinking.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

"With all due respect, that's a bunch of malarkey," Vice President Biden said during Thursday's debate as he challenged Rep. Paul Ryan's assertion that U.S. foreign policy has unraveled under President Obama.

A little later in the debate, Biden said Ryan's criticisms were "a bunch of stuff" — and when moderator Martha Raddatz asked "what does that mean?" he said, "we Irish call it malarkey."

Biden's use of the word has many asking: Where does it come from?

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Movie Reviews
11:38 am
Fri October 12, 2012

'Argo': Too Good To Be True, Because It Isn't

CIA agents Tony Mendez (Ben Affleck) and Jack O'Donnell (Bryan Cranston) plan a risky mission to save six Americans trapped in Iran.
Claire Folger Warner Bros. Pictures

Originally published on Fri October 12, 2012 12:01 pm

Ben Affleck's Argo is two-two-TWO movies in one, and while neither is especially original, by merging them Affleck pulls off a coup. First, he gives you espionage with the You Are There zing of a documentary. Then he serves up broad showbiz satire. For his final feat, he blends the two into a pulse-pounding nail-biter of a climax. And this all really happened. Most of it. Except for that climax.

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