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The Two-Way
4:55 pm
Thu April 4, 2013

Reports: Hewlett-Packard's Chairman Will Step Aside

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 5:44 pm

Hewlett-Packard's chairman Raymond Lane will give up his position, The Wall Street Journal, Reuters and Bloomberg are reporting.

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Found Recipes
4:40 pm
Thu April 4, 2013

A Simple Chinese Twist On Young Soybeans

Young soybeans, often known as edamame, are firmer than peas. Cookbook author Fuchsia Dunlop says they make an easy and delicious dinner when stir-fried.
Courtesy of Chris Terry

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 7:20 pm

What comes to mind when you think of Chinese food? Is it takeout, thick sauces or deep-fried meat? Cookbook author Fuchsia Dunlop wants to change that.

"Really, the traditional diet is all about vegetables," she says. "In the past, most people couldn't afford to eat much meat, so they had to concentrate on making their everyday vegetarian produce taste sensational."

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Europe
4:02 pm
Thu April 4, 2013

Emigre Artist Sculpted Exquisite Gems Of Russian Folk Life

Bosom Pals, an iconic sculpture by Russian artist Vasily Konovalenko.
Denver Museum of Nature and Science

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 7:20 pm

A team of American researchers is on a treasure hunt for jewels — of both artistic and historic value.

This month, researchers from Denver were in Russia to document the work of Vasily Konovalenko, a former ballet set designer turned sculptor, who created scenes from Russian folk life in semiprecious stones.

In the 1980s, Konovalenko emigrated from what was then the Soviet Union in search of artistic freedom. Now, his legacy is divided between the U.S. and Russia.

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Remembrances
3:22 pm
Thu April 4, 2013

For Pulitzer-Winning Critic Roger Ebert, Films Were A Journey

Ebert works in his office at the WTTW-TV studios in Chicago on Jan. 12, 2011.
Charles Rex Arbogast AP

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 7:20 pm

He won a Pulitzer Prize for his writing, but just as influential as his print essays were his "thumbs up" and "thumbs down" movie reviews. Film critic Roger Ebert died Thursday after struggling for years with cancer. He was 70 years old.

His thumb may have made him famous on TV, but Ebert was first and foremost a print journalist. He worked on newspapers in grade school, high school and college. With his acumen for writing came a love of movies — and on July 12, 2005, proclaimed Roger Ebert Day by the city of Chicago, he told a crowd of admirers why movies matter.

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It's All Politics
3:19 pm
Thu April 4, 2013

Oregon Weighs Own Gun Measures After Mall Shooting, Newtown

Gun rights supporters rally at the Oregon Capitol in February.
Chris Lehman Northwest News Network

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 7:20 pm

Oregon state lawmakers have scheduled a marathon public hearing Friday on four gun control bills. The proposals include a ban on guns in schools and criminal background checks for private gun sales.

Opponents are lining up against the measures, but some gun control advocates say the proposals don't go far enough.

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Remembrances
3:07 pm
Thu April 4, 2013

'Simple And Straighforward': Remembering Film Critic Roger Ebert

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 4:46 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

Murray, we're just hearing that film critic Roger Ebert has died. The Chicago Sun Times, Ebert's paper, tweeted the news a few moments ago. Ebert, of course, an icon of film criticism, a one-time filmmaker himself, best known perhaps for his days on TV with fellow critic Gene Siskel. Their thumbs up or thumbs down rating system now a de facto review method of critics and filmgoers alike.

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The Two-Way
2:43 pm
Thu April 4, 2013

Roger Ebert, Legendary Film Critic, Dies

Film critic Roger Ebert arrives at the 25th Film Independent's Spirit Awards held at Nokia Event Deck at L.A. Live on March 5, 2010 in Los Angeles, California.
Kevin Winter Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 4:15 pm

Roger Ebert, the legendary film critic, died today, his long-time employer, The Chicago Sun-Times is reporting.

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Around the Nation
2:36 pm
Thu April 4, 2013

Tackling Terrible Traffic: How Cities Try To Ease Commutes

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 4:46 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Some of you are sitting in traffic right now, muttering darkly about how it's possible to hit every single red light. Los Angeles, a city that suffers more congestion than most, tried to unclog traffic for years by synchronizing its lights. Earlier this year, it became the first major city to tie all its traffic lights to a computerized system that uses motion sensors and cameras to monitor flows of traffic. They report modest improvements, but do drivers notice any change?

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The Two-Way
2:31 pm
Thu April 4, 2013

Pew: Majority Of Americans Now Favor Legalizing Marijuana

A sheriff officer sifts through marijuana in the back of a trailer which was confiscated from a field last Wednesday in Sanger, Calif.

Gary Kazanjian AP

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 7:20 pm

For the first time in four decades of polling, a majority of Americans support legalizing the use of marijuana.

A Pew poll released today found that 52 percent of those polled said marijuana should be legal. Forty-five percent said it should be illegal.

Pew reports:

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NPR Front Row
1:49 pm
Thu April 4, 2013

Blaudzun: NPR Front Row

NPR Music

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 2:33 pm

The Dutch band Blaudzun had its work cut out for it at the SXSW Music Festival, as it somehow wound up opening for a March 15 showcase of Turkish music. But Blaudzun's songs are so undeniably infectious that, by the time the band played "Elephants" — the song featured in this Front Row video — the folks at Austin, Texas' Cedar Street Courtyard were singing and dancing to music they'd never heard before.

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