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10:17 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Physicists Find New Particle, Look for Answers

Originally published on Fri August 23, 2013 9:42 am

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. This week, researchers reported that they think they've spotted the tell-tale signs of a previously undiscovered, subatomic particle. This one was unusual because it appeared to be made of four quarks bound together, an arrangement they have never seen before. And they're not sure exactly how that arrangement might work.

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What's New?
10:15 am
Fri June 21, 2013

For The Love Of Dolphins

David McNew Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 20, 2013 11:09 am

I'm on vacation this week, resting and walking along the New Jersey shore. Naturally, I have sea creatures on my mind. Dolphins, especially.

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What's New?
10:14 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Online Tracking: Is Everyone Doing It?

Gabriel Weinberg is the founder and CEO of DuckDuckGo.
Courtesy of Duck Duck Go

Originally published on Thu June 20, 2013 1:48 pm

Today's phrase: "search engines that do not collect personal information."

We Googled it this morning (with the quotation marks) and got one measly hit — a 2012 forum in LinuxQuestions, a message board that explores the open-source operating system.

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Author Interviews
10:14 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Oliver Sacks, Exploring How Hallucinations Happen

Knopf

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 1:28 pm

This interview was originally broadcast on Nov. 6, 2012.

In Oliver Sacks' book The Mind's Eye, the neurologist included an interesting footnote in a chapter about losing vision in one eye because of cancer that said: "In the '60s, during a period of experimenting with large doses of amphetamines, I experienced a different sort of vivid mental imagery."

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What's New?
10:13 am
Fri June 21, 2013

The Quest To Rescue Beijing's Trashed Photo Negatives

Courtesy of Thomas Sauvin

Originally published on Thu June 20, 2013 11:24 am

It's a bit hyperbolic. And French-born, Beijing-based photo preservationist Thomas Sauvin is the first to say he's really not trying to rescue all the world's photos, let alone China's, let alone Beijing's. Even still, he's managed to save about half a million negatives from being recycled.

What happens to trashed negatives if Sauvin doesn't get to them first? In China, at least, they're collected, dropped in acid (along with old X-rays), and what remains — the silver nitrate — will fetch a decent price.

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TED Radio Hour
10:11 am
Fri June 21, 2013

How Much Can Children Teach Themselves?

Sugata Mitra at the TED conference in 2013.
James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Mon December 16, 2013 4:11 pm

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Unstoppable Learning.

About Sugata Mitra's TED Talk

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What's New?
10:11 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Paula Deen: Child Of Dixie, Meet The Internet Age

Will Paula Deen's admission of using a racial slur crumble her empire?
Courtesy of Food Network AP

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 10:57 am

Paula Deen may be famous for her deep-fried Southern cooking, but the Internet isn't buying her defense that she used a racial slur because of her deep Dixie roots.

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Movie Reviews
10:10 am
Fri June 21, 2013

For Pixar's 'Monsters,' A Sophomore Slump

For Billy Crystal's Mike, the big green eyeball of Monsters University, scaring hardly comes naturally.
Pixar

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 11:27 am

It's a big month for origin stories: first the Man of Steel, now the Eye of Green and the Abominable Furball of Blue — aka Mike and Sully, top scarers at Monsters, Inc. How did they become the best of the best, you ask? You didn't ask? Well, Pixar's got the answer anyway: They trained at Monsters U.

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The Two-Way
10:09 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Welcome, Summer! Revelers Celebrate The Solstice

In Macedonia, people look at the horizon from a rocky crest filled with astronomical markers at the megalithic observatory Kokino, which NASA ranks as the fourth oldest observatory in the world.
Robert Atanasovki AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 11:42 am

Whether you like it or not, the day will be bright. For those of us in the northern hemisphere, today is the summer solstice, which marks the longest daylight period of the year and the official start of summer.

As The Weather Channel explains, it's also a little more special this year, because the solstice occurred on different days for different time zones.

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Code Switch
9:18 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Breaking Golf's Color Barrier In Birmingham

Three men are denied access to a golf course in Columbus, Ohio, in January 1956. Blacks were regularly denied access to golf courses.
AP

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 5:07 pm

This week, All Things Considered host Audie Cornish traveled to Birmingham, Ala., to cover the 50th anniversary of the tumultuous civil rights protests that happened there. It's all part of NPR's series commemorating the monumental summer of 1963.

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