Top Stories

Gov. Mary Fallin's Office

Fallin Vetoes Most of Special Session Budget Bill

Gov. Mary Fallin vetoed Friday evening most of the bill lawmakers passed in special session to deal with Oklahoma's $215 million budget hole. Fallin vetoed all but five of the 170 sections in House Bill 1019, passed earlier Friday by the Senate and Wednesday by the House of Representatives. "House Bill 1019 does not provide a long-term solution to the re-occurring budget deficits, and within three months we will come back facing an estimated $600 million shortfall," Fallin said. Fallin...

Read More
DA's Office

Tulsa DA Recuses Office in Bixby Football Case

There is another twist in the sexual assault/hazing investigation involving members of the Bixby High School football team. The Tulsa County District Attorney, Steve Kunzweiler, has stepped aside from the case. Any prosecution will now be handled by the Rogers County District Attorney at Claremore. It is unclear if the DA’s office has the case report. The Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation took over the lead in the case earlier in the week from the Bixby police department.

Read More

Chief Of Puerto Rico's Power Authority Resigns Under Fire

The head of Puerto Rico's power authority stepped down Friday amid controversy over his handling of a system that still can't deliver electricity to that island two months after Hurricane Maria destroyed the power grid. Ricardo Ramos, executive director of the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority, or PREPA, resigned as he was unable to shake off questions about a $300 million contract that he had awarded to Whitefish, a small Montana-based energy firm, that was supposed to restore power on...

Read More

Toilet Signs Are Mysterious And Mirth-Inducing

You are in a foreign country. And things are certainly looking a bit foreign. Do you sit or squat? Can you toss toilet paper down the bowl or hole? Let the signs guide you. That is, if you can understand them. Doug Lansky, author of the Signspotting series of books, knows how toilet etiquette signs can be mysterious, misleading and hilarious. His books include all types of funny warning and advice signs, but the topic of toilets is especially popular. Lansky, who gave up a job offer at the...

Read More

On the Next All This Jazz: Some Wonderful Live Recordings

Join us for the next All This Jazz, starting at 9pm on Saturday the 18th, right here on KWGS / Public Radio Tulsa. Our third-hour theme (running from 11pm till midnight) will be Live Recordings -- and so we'll hear some stellar live-in-performance tracks from guitarist Mark Whitfield, saxophonist Cannonball Adderley (shown here), bassist Jaco Pastorius, and many others. And elsewhere in our show, we'll dig the music of Joanne Brackeen, Dave Holland, Anat Cohen, Tim Armacost, and more. Join us...

Read More

StudioTulsa

"To have great poets," as Walt Whitman once noted, "there must also be great audiences." And great cities, it would seem, likewise require great bookstores. On this edition of ST, we learn all about Magic City Books -- an indie bookstore owned and operated by the non-profit Tulsa Literary Coalition (or TLC) -- which will soon, at long last, open for business in downtown Tulsa. Indeed, after a series of construction-related delays, Magic City Books will open on Monday the 20th at 9pm...with Mayor G.T.

Our guest is Helen Thorpe, a Denver-based journalist and author whose newest book, just out, is called "The Newcomers: Finding Refuge, Friendship, and Hope in an American Classroom." As noted of this work in a starred review from Publishers Weekly: "The latest work of narrative nonfiction from Thorpe ('Soldier Girls') brings readers face to face with the global refugee crisis through the story of a Denver English-acquisition class composed of teenage refugees from all over the world.

Our guest on ST is Issa Kohler-Hausmann, who will tomorrow night (Thursday the 16th) deliver the 2017 Judge Stephanie K. Seymour Distinguished Lecture in Law here at TU.

On this edition of ST, Robert Dallek is our guest; he is the well-regarded American historian whose books include "Camelot's Court" and "Nixon and Kissinger," among several others. He joins us to talk about his newest volume, "Franklin D. Roosevelt: A Political Life." As was noted of this book in a Christian Science Monitor review: "[Dallek] believes that FDR was a born politician of ferocious and very nearly infallible instincts, and through a combination of extensive research and first-rate storyteller's gifts, [Dallek] makes the reader believe it, too.

(Note: This interview originally aired in May of this year.) On this edition of our show, we speak with Dr. Rachel Pearson about her new book, "No Apparent Distress: A Doctor's Coming-of-Age on the Front Lines of American Medicine." As was noted of this reflective and well-written book by Kirkus Reviews: "[In this book] a sensitive doctor describes her beginnings navigating the unpredictable, woolly world of modern American health care.

More StudioTulsa

For the past almost-50 years, I've been sharing an old family Thanksgiving recipe with NPR listeners. Mama Stamberg's Cranberry Relish comes from my late mother-in-law Marjorie Stamberg, who served it in Allentown, Pa., when I was brought there to be inspected by my future in-laws.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The national conversation about sexual misconduct is reaching a fever pitch here in Washington, D.C., particularly on Capitol Hill.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The late Raymond Chandler has a new story out. Chandler, who died in 1959, wrote detective fiction set in mid-20th century Los Angeles. Our colleague Steve Inskeep reports on a previously unpublished Chandler tale.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Republicans are doing some celebrating this morning because, yesterday, the House passed a Republican bill to overhaul the U.S. tax code. This plan slashes the corporate tax rate, and it eliminates some popular deductions.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Astronomers in California are building the largest digital camera in the world. It will go on a giant telescope taking shape in Chile called the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

LSST is different from most large telescopes. Instead of staring at a tiny patch of the sky and taking essentially one snapshot in time, LSST will take a panorama of every part of the sky...and it will do so over and over and over. The idea is to see what's moving or changing in the heavens.

A Saudi-led blockade of Yemen continues to exacerbate a humanitarian crisis that aid groups are calling the most severe in decades.

Ask people in Canada what they make of U.S. health care, and the answer typically falls between bewilderment and outrage.

Canada, after all, prides itself on a health system that guarantees government insurance for everyone. And many Canadians find it baffling that there's anybody in the United States who can't afford a visit to the doctor.

The law intended to shine a light on foreign entities and foreign governments working to influence policy in Washington, D.C., has been called everything from "toothless" to "a complete joke."

But Justice Department special counsel Robert Mueller isn't laughing — and neither may potential violators if he decides to make it his new weapon of choice.

Raqqa, the de facto capital of the Islamic State, is taken and in ruins.

U.S. troops and civilian aid workers are in the Syrian city, helping local officials restore basic services such as food, water and electricity.

But the recapture of ISIS-held territory in Iraq and Syria is only a partial win for U.S. policy. After seven years of civil war, the regime of Syrian President Bashar Assad remains in power. The other U.S. objectives — the end of the Assad regime, a new Syrian constitution and democratic elections — remain unfulfilled.

It's tough getting old, and that goes as much for giant pandas as people.

Veterinarians at the National Zoo in Washington, D.C., say Tian Tian, an adult male panda, received laser treatment and acupuncture for what they initially thought was a touch of arthritis in his left shoulder.

During the exam earlier this week while the 20-year-old Tian Tian (pronounced t-YEN t-YEN) was under anesthesia, vets also took blood and urine samples and performed X-rays.

Pages