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Oklahoma Forestry Service

Wildfire Arson Connection?

Authorities are investigating the possibility of arson in connection with one of two large wildfires burning in Oklahoma, a blaze that's resulted in the death of one person. Dewey County Sheriff Clay Sander said Friday that one person has been questioned, but not arrested, about a fire that began July 12 near Vici, about 110 miles (180 kilometers) northwest of Oklahoma City. That fire merged with a fire that began near Leedey and has burned about 452 square miles (1,171 sq. kilometers)....

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npr

Oklahoma Senate Rejects Proposal to Delete Most Police Body Camera Video After 90 Days

The Oklahoma Senate defeated a measure this week to let law enforcement agencies in the state store most body camera footage for just 90 days. Agencies would submit to their district attorneys for approval guidelines on how they would determine if videos must be kept longer. Sen. Wayne Shaw said the measure was requested by the Tulsa County Sheriff’s Office. "It costs approximately $80 a month per police officer to store that information, which, just for Tulsa County alone, is talking about...

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8 Years After Deepwater Horizon Explosion, Is Another Disaster Waiting To Happen?

Within seconds, a bright, white flash erupted on the lower deck of West Delta 105 E, an oil-production platform positioned a dozen miles off the Louisiana coast. Disoriented, one crew member found himself 10 feet away from where he had been working before he blacked out. Another likened the impact to a sledgehammer blow to his head. A third told investigators he felt like he'd been hit by an 18-wheeler, his hard hat, glasses and earplugs knocked off in the blast. For a fourth, death came...

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The Give and Take on Mental Health on April 23 at 5:30 P.M.

On the Next ATJ: Jazz for Earth Day!

Join us for the next All This Jazz, starting at 9pm on Saturday the 21st, right here on KWGS / Public Radio Tulsa. On this Earth Day Weekend, our program’s third-hour theme -- running from 11pm till midnight -- will be Earth Jazz . Thus we'll hear Sun Ra doing "Planet Earth," Randy Weston (shown here) playing "Earth Birth," and Bela Fleck & The Flecktones running through their "Earthling Parade," to name just a few. And elsewhere in our show, we'll dig the music of Blossom Dearie, Chucho...

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StudioTulsa

In the ongoing search for better treatment of mental health issues and illnesses, one crucial consideration is the trade-off between the effectiveness of a given treatment versus any unpleasant or damaging side-effects it might have. On this edition of ST, we are talking about one such treatment -- it's one that's actually been around for decades, but that is now being done in a much different (and far more nuanced) manner: electrical stimulation of the brain. Our guest is Dr. Hamed Ekhtiari, an associate investigator at the Laureate Institute for Brain Research (or LIBR) here in Tulsa.

On this edition of ST, we learn about the first-ever Tulsa Lit.Fest, an impressive array of free-to-the-public events that will happen here in our community from tomorrow (the 19th) through Sunday (the 22nd).

(Please note: This show first aired back in December.) Artificial "machine" intelligence is, of course, a part of our lives now -- we have cruise control in our cars, automatic checkout services at the supermarket, and (most importantly?) those smartphones in our pockets. But what will life be like when artificial "sentient" intelligence becomes the norm? And when will that happen?

On this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, our guest is the writer, cancer survivor, entrepreneur, and former Tulsa resident, Paige Davis, who is also the author of a new memoir: "Here We Grow: Mindfulness Through Cancer and Beyond." Davis will be the keynote speaker at the upcoming symposium known as Celebrating the Art of Healing 2018: "The Future is Now." This all-day symposium will happen Saturday, April 28th, at the Town & Country School in Tulsa (at 8906 E. 34th Street).

Our guest is Rob McKeown, a former food writer and food-magazine editor who's also done research and concept-development for renowned chefs and notable hotels and restaurants worldwide. He is the curator for "Botanical!" -- i.e., a series of fundraising events happening this weekend at Tulsa Botanic Garden.

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A gunman shot and killed two sheriff's deputies in a restaurant in Gilchrist County, Fla., on Thursday, in an attack that seems to have come with no warning.

Sgt. Noel Ramirez, 30, and Deputy Taylor Lindsey, 25, were shot through the window. The gunman was later found dead nearby.

Sheriff Bobby Schultz called the two deputies "the best of the best," adding, "They're men of integrity, they're men of loyalty. They're God-fearing, and they loved what they did. And we're very proud of them."

Where other chefs might see kitchen trash, Tim Ma finds treasure — for his culinary creations, and his bottom line.

A Baby On The Senate Floor

Apr 20, 2018

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

There was a fresh new face on the Senate floor this week.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Yeah. Let's explain here. Illinois Democrat Tammy Duckworth made history last week when she became the first senator to give birth while in office.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

The U.S. government has been holding an American citizen in Iraq without charge for more than seven months. Yesterday, a federal judge blocked the government from transferring the man against his will to a third country.

The American Federation of Teachers said Thursday that it is cutting its financial ties with Wells Fargo as a result of the banking giant's relationships with the National Rifle Association and gunmakers.

The AFT, a 1.7 million-member national union, is dropping the bank as a recommended mortgage lender, to which it currently channels more than 20,000 AFT mortgages.

Couple Has 14 Kids — All Boys

Apr 20, 2018

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

In April 1968, the United States was grieving. The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated by a white nationalist. Cities burned with riots.

Across the Atlantic, Britain was debating the Race Relations Act, which made it illegal to deny a person employment, housing or public services based on race or national origin.

The spring thaw is upon us, and parched western states will be watching closely as snows melt and rivers rise. Fancy satellites monitor water levels in the biggest rivers, but they don't spot the smaller streams and waterways that feed into them. Now, some Colorado scientists have hit on a new way of tracking those smaller streams — inspired, by Pokemon.

Within seconds, a bright, white flash erupted on the lower deck of West Delta 105 E, an oil-production platform positioned a dozen miles off the Louisiana coast. Disoriented, one crew member found himself 10 feet away from where he had been working before he blacked out. Another likened the impact to a sledgehammer blow to his head. A third told investigators he felt like he'd been hit by an 18-wheeler, his hard hat, glasses and earplugs knocked off in the blast.

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