Top Stories

File photo

National Advocates Praise Oklahoma for Criminal Justice Reform Efforts

Oklahoma has earned recognition for efforts to reduce its prison population. Gov. Mary Fallin is featured in a new campaign that highlights states leading the way. U.S. Justice Action Network Executive Director Holly Harris said Fallin is the first governor to mention high female incarceration rates during a state of the state address. "You know, we talk a lot about racial disparities, but we don't talk a whole lot about what is exploding the female prison population," Harris said. "So, Gov....

Read More
Facebook

Supreme Court Rejects Attorney General's Pot Ballot Rewrite

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — The Oklahoma Supreme Court has rejected a proposed rewrite of a ballot question on medical marijuana that was submitted by the state Attorney General's office. In a 7-1 ruling on Monday, the state's highest court rejected the proposed rewrite that supporters of the medical marijuana initiative had argued was intentionally misleading and could confuse people into thinking they were voting to fully legalize marijuana. Under the ruling, the original ballot language drafted...

Read More

Trump's Agenda May Be Doomed Unless He Learns That 'Little' Stuff Matters

President Trump was downright low energy. The look on his face, as he meandered through unscripted remarks Friday after the defeat of the Republican health care plan he supported, told the story. The unusually subdued Trump called the loss a "learning experience." Then he seemed to shrug it all off and said he was moving on. But it's hardly going to be that simple or easy. The same fissures in the GOP that derailed the health care bill will be there when it comes to any big issue moving...

Read More

Breast-Fed Kids May Be Less Hyper, But Not Necessarily Smarter, Study Finds

Breast-feeding has many known health benefits, but there's still debate about how it may influence kids' behavior and intelligence. Now, a new study published in Pediatrics finds that children who are breast-fed for at least six months as babies have less hyperactive behavior by age 3 compared with kids who weren't breast-fed. But the study also finds that breast-feeding doesn't necessarily lead to a cognitive boost. Researchers studied 8,000 children in Ireland. At ages 3 and 5, the kids...

Read More

A durable and reusable NPR tote bag. Perfect for your trips to the farmer's market.

StudioTulsa

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we learn about the newly renovated Tandy Family YMCA (at 5005 S. Darlington Avenue). This impressive new facility, per the YMCA of Greater Tulsa website, "is a YMCA for the next generation. More than 110,000 square feet dedicated to the pursuit of healthy living and community-building [comprise] this state-of-the-art facility...[which was] built on the grounds of the 50-year-old Thornton Family YMCA, one of the anchors of midtown Tulsa.

For more than three decades, Carnegie Hall's beloved Link Up program has "linked" orchestras with students in grades 3 through 5 across the nation; the overall goal is for students to learn orchestral repertoire and fundamental music skills -- including creative work and composition -- by way of a hands-on, in-depth music curriculum.

How, if at all, will the Israeli-Palenstinian conflict be affected by the Trump White House? Our guest on this edition of StudioTulsa spoke on this topic last night at the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations (or TCFR). Gershon Baskin is the founder of the Israel-Palestine Center for Research and Information, a joint public-policy think tank.

This coming weekend -- on March 24th, 25th, and 26th -- Tulsa Ballet will present "Swan Lake," the classic 19th-century ballet, with music by Tchaikovsky, about a young maiden who has been trapped in the form of a swan by an evil sorcerer's curse. Our guest on StudioTulsa is Marcello Angelini, the Artistic Director of Tulsa Ballet, who tells us about this new production. It's a piece he knows very well, having danced it scores of times as a young dancer in his native Italy and then, later, as a member of the Kiev Institute of Dance in the former Soviet Union.

On this installment of ST Medical Monday, a discussion of the sport of rowing -- how it works, what its health and fitness benefits are, how it has developed as a competitive sport, and so on. Our guest is Micah Hartwell, a lecturer in the Dept. of Health & Human Performance at OSU Tulsa who's also the Nutrition Services Program Director for Tulsa CARES as well as the Varsity Men's Rowing Coach for the Tulsa Youth Rowing Association. As Hartwell tells us, this is a sport that draws upon all of one's muscle groups, and that one can safely practice throughout life.

More StudioTulsa

Six Southwood- grown herbs of your choice!

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2017 KERA. To see more, visit KERA.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

LOURDES GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

The Pentagon announced Saturday that it had killed a Pakistani terrorist leader with ties to al-Qaida and the Pakistani Taliban.

In a statement, the Pentagon said that Qari Yasin was killed in a U.S. airstrike on March 19 in Afghanistan's Paktika Province. It said he was a "senior terrorist figure" and that he had plotted the 2009 attack on the Sri Lankan cricket team in Lahore and the 2008 bombing of the Marriott hotel in Islamabad.

Reuters reports that Yasin was killed in a drone strike.

For a girl growing up on a one-lane dirt road in a Connecticut town, it seemed the only way to look was up.

But Nancy Miorelli was nearsighted, so although she spent most days outside until dinnertime, she couldn't see the birds flying above her head.

"So I guess that left things that were crawling on the ground," the 27-year-old entomologist says.

Yep, bugs. But poor eyesight isn't the reason she puts herself in what others might feel is nightmarish proximity to bugs these days.

Undergoing treatment for cancer is hard enough by itself. And for many cancer patients who spend most of their time in a hospital, it gets even harder with the loss of basic comforts. The hospital's sterile environment, the fluorescent lights and the disposable gowns do little to make medical treatment more bearable. Nikla Lancksweert, wanted to do a little something to help with that dehumanizing experience, focusing on an alternative for those uncomfortable hospital gowns.

Pages