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2 Shot at Oklahoma City Restaurant; Civilian Kills Gunman

A man armed with a pistol walked into an Oklahoma City restaurant at the dinner hour and opened fire, wounding two customers, before being shot dead by a handgun-carrying civilian in the parking lot, police said. The shooting happened around 6:30 p.m. Thursday at Louie's On The Lake, a restaurant on Lake Hefner. A woman and a female juvenile were undergoing surgery for gunshot wounds but apparently "are going to survive," said Capt. Bo Matthews, a police spokesman. A man suffered a broken arm...

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Quintin Solviev-Wikimedia

Passenger Jet Makes Emergency Landing in Tulsa

A United Airlines Express Jet is diverted to Tulsa. No injuries were reported last evening. The pilot reported a pressurization issue while in flight. The flight originated in Omaha and was headed to Houston.

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Federal Election Commission Can't Decide If Russian Interference Violated Law

As tech companies and government agencies prepare to defend against possible Russian interference in the midterm elections, the Federal Election Commission has a different response: too soon. The four commissioners on Thursday deadlocked, again, on proposals to consider new rules, for example, for foreign-influenced U.S. corporations and for politically active entities that don't disclose their donors. "We have reason to think there are foreign actors who are looking for every single avenue...

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On the Next All This Jazz, Music by Miles Davis (on His Birthday)

Catch the next broadcast of All This Jazz, starting at 9pm on Saturday the 26th, right here on KWGS / Public Radio Tulsa. It'll be three solid hours of can't-miss modern jazz -- and it'll happen, btw, on what would've been the 92nd b'day of Miles Davis (who was born 5/26/1926 and died at age 65). Thus we'll hear several tasty Miles tracks throughout the evening. Also, in the third and thematic hour of our show -- in celebration of the Extended Memorial Day Weekend -- our theme will be...

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StudioTulsa

Neurobiologist and primatologist Robert Sapolsky has spent his professional life attempting to understand the underpinnings and science behind human behavior, studying wild baboon populations as well as the complex workings of the human brain. The professor of biology and neurology at Stanford University and MacArthur Foundation "Genius Grant" recipient is the author of several books on various aspects of behavior -- and his latest, "Behave: The Biology of Humans at Our Best and Worse," seems like a summation of his knowledge on the subject.

Photo by George Hirose

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with mezzo-soprano and vocal performance artist Alicia Hall-Moran, a versatile singer at home with opera, art, theatre, and jazz. Hall-Moran made her Broadway debut understudying as "Bess" in the revival of "The Gershwin's Porgy & Bess," but the main thrust of her work is in varied collaborations with a "who's who" of creative types -- from her husband, the celebrated jazz musician Jason Moran, to visual artists like Carrie Mae Weems and choreographers like Bill T. Jones. 

On this broadcast of ST, we learn about a new book called "Art Deco Tulsa" -- and our guests are the two people who created it: Suzanne Fitzgerald Wallis wrote the text, and Sam Joyner made the photographs. As is noted of this book at its publisher's website: "Transformed from a cattle depot into the Oil Capital of the World, Tulsa emerged as an iconic Jazz Age metropolis. The Magic City attracted some of the nation's most talented architects, including Bruce Goff, Francis Barry Byrne, Frank Lloyd Wright, Joseph R.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Katie Watson, an award-winning professor who has taught bioethics, medical humanities, and constitutional law for several years at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine. She joins us to discuss her smart, well-balanced, and accessible new book, "Scarlet A: The Ethics, Law, and Politics of Ordinary Abortion." Per The Chicago Tribune, it "is a thoughtful and engaging consideration of one of this country's most controversial words: abortion." And further, from Louise P.

Our guest is the California-based seismologist, Dr. Lucy Jones, whose new book is "The Big Ones." It offers a bracing look at some of the history's greatest natural disasters, world-altering events whose reverberations we continue to feel today. At Pompeii, for example, Dr. Jones explores how a volcanic eruption in the first century AD challenged prevailing views of religion. Later in the book, she examines the California floods of 1862 and how they show that memory itself can change or fade over successive generations.

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Barbara Cook On Piano Jazz

15 hours ago

This week's Piano Jazz remembers Barbara Cook (Oct. 25, 1927 – Aug. 8, 2017), the Tony and Grammy Award-winning lyric soprano who was a favorite of audiences around the world. She was a star on Broadway as an ingénue and became a staple of the New York cabaret scene in the later years of her prolific career.

Don't call Thea Musgrave a "woman composer."

"When I'm composing, I'm a human being," she insists. "It's not a question of sexuality."

When Emmanuel Macron visited the White House a month ago, commentators nicknamed the French president the "Trump Whisperer" for establishing a close personal rapport with President Trump.

Now Macron is in Russia, where he is sidling up to Vladimir Putin on a two-day trip to St. Petersburg, the splendorous czarist-era imperial capital and the Russian president's hometown.

Updated at 7:51 p.m. ET

Two exit polls in Ireland's referendum on abortion rights indicate that a majority of voters want to do away with a constitutional amendment that recognizes the "right to life of the unborn."

Less than 24 hours after President Trump sent notice to North Korea that he was canceling next month's summit with Kim Jong Un, Trump told reporters Friday that the meeting could still happen as planned.

Using one of his favorite phrases, Trump told reporters, "We'll see what happens," adding, "it could even be the 12th." The original summit date was June 12.

It's not easy being in charge of foreign relations of a country most of the world refuses to recognize.

Taiwan lost another ally on Thursday. The West African country Burkina Faso became the latest country to cut ties with the island. After the Dominican Republic, that's two in less than one month. And like other countries, including the United States, that for decades have broken diplomatic relations with Taiwan, they did so for one reason: to please China.

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Updated at 9:58 a.m. ET

Harvey Weinstein surrendered Friday to authorities at a police station in New York City, where the former Hollywood megaproducer has been charged with rape and sexual misconduct.

Weinstein arrived early in the morning at the New York Police Department's 1st Precinct in Lower Manhattan, ushered into the station by law enforcement officers as members of the media crowded behind metal barriers. He kept his gaze lowered amid a barrage of shouted questions.

Roman Catholics and evangelicals, two Christian groups that have had overlapping political priorities in the past, find their agendas diverging in the era of President Trump and Pope Francis.

Tensions between the two faith traditions are hardly new. As fierce adversaries, they once cast doubt on each other's legitimacy as heirs to the church of Jesus Christ.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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