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Kepler Found Guilty in 4th Trial

A former Tulsa Police officer has been convicted of first-degree manslaughter in his fourth trial for the 2014 fatal shooting of his estranged daughter's boyfriend. Jurors reached a verdict for the lesser charge late Wednesday in ex-Tulsa officer Shannon Kepler's first-degree murder trial. The jury recommended a sentence of 15 years in prison. A sentencing hearing is scheduled for November 20. Kepler was off-duty when he shot 19-year-old Jeremey Lake. He told investigators he fired because he...

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Oklahoma Watch

Mental Health Commissioner Warns of "Decimated" System Ahead

The director of the agency that provides mental health and substance abuse services says outpatient programs provided to 189,000 Oklahomans will be eliminated and other services will be cut on Nov. 1 due to a state budget gap that's forcing a $75 million cut to the agency's budget. Commissioner Terri White of the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services said Wednesday the agency will have to cut its budget if state lawmakers don't fill a $215 million hole in the state...

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Veterans, Survivors' Groups Try To Shift The Conversation On Condolences

Four American soldiers were killed in action in Niger this month. Their deaths made a few headlines at the time. But this week they are in the news again, with far more prominence, because of a bitter political debate over presidential condolence calls. The sudden prominence of the soldiers' deaths — but in a way that highlights political tension and factual disputes, rather than honoring of sacrifice — has left some military advocates struggling for words and striving to redirect attention...

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A Trump Golf Course Said It Gave Millions To Charity. Here's What The Numbers Say

Throughout his presidential campaign and since, President Trump has made bold assertions about his charitable giving. But as the Washington Post has thoroughly documented , those boasts of philanthropy don't always stand up to scrutiny. Now NPR has taken a closer look at the charitable-giving claims made by a Trump property, the Trump National Golf Club, Los Angeles. We have found that the golf club's charitable giving has followed the same pattern — falling far short of what the organization...

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StudioTulsa

On this edition of ST, we chat with the New York-based author and journalist Jennifer Egan, whose newest novel, the much-praised "Manhattan Beach," is just out. As was noted of this book in a starred review in Kirkus: "After stretching the boundaries of fiction in myriad ways...Egan does perhaps the only thing left that could surprise: she writes a thoroughly traditional novel. Realistically detailed, poetically charged, and utterly satisfying: apparently there's nothing Egan can't do." And further, per Dwight Garner in The New York Times: "Immensely satisfying....

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we learn about the remarkable life and work of Dr. John Sarno, who died earlier this year at 93. As was noted in his New York Times obituary, Dr. Sarno was "a doctor at New York University whose controversial books on the psychological origins of chronic pain sold over a million copies, even while he was largely ignored or maligned by many of his medical peers.... Revered by some as a saint and dismissed by others as a quack, Dr.

The 2017 Tulsa American Film Festival, or TAFF, showcasing indie features and shorts from across the United States -- with a focus on local, classic, student, Native American, and Okie-rooted films -- continues here in T-Town at several different venues. Tonight, the 13th, the TAFF will present the Oklahoma Premiere of a new documentary film about the life and work of Wilma Mankiller, who in 1985 was the first woman elected as Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation.

On this edition of ST, we chat with Jimmy Webb, who grew up in rural Oklahoma before going out to Hollywood, while still a teen, to break into the songwriting biz...and who eventually created such classic pop tunes as "Wichita Lineman," "By The Time I Get To Phoenix," "Up, Up and Away," and "MacArthur Park." Webb will soon perform (on the 14th) with the Bartlesville Symphony, singing and playing his wonderful songs while also telling plenty of stories. He shares a few of those stories with us today -- many of which also appear in his recent memoir, "The Cake and the Rain."

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we learn about the work of Kay WalkingStick, a widely celebrated American landscape artist who once referred to herself as "a New York painter and a Cherokee woman." Now 82, and equally (and impressively) adept in both abstract and representational styles, WalkingStick is the subject of a newly opened retrospective exhibition at the Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa.

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Hidden Sixties Halloween Special

Fri., Oct. 27 at 8:00 p.m. on Public Radio 89.5

A behind-the-scenes look at museums podcast

For people with diabetes, keeping blood sugar levels in a normal range – not too high or too low – is a lifelong challenge. New technologies to ease the burden are emerging rapidly, but insurance reimbursement challenges, supply shortages, and shifting competition make it tough for patients to access them quickly.

Copyright 2017 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

Chinese President Xi Jinping proclaimed the arrival of "a new era" in which a reinvigorated Communist Party will lead his nation to modernity, wealth and power as he opened the 19th national congress of China's ruling Communist Party on Wednesday.

The meeting is expected to give him a second five-year term.

Xi's speech, delivered in the cavernous Great Hall of the People overlooking Beijing's Tiananmen Square, lasted for 3 1/2 hours and traced the broad outlines of his vision and the party's policies.

Updated at 4:06 p.m. ET

A proposal in the Senate to help stabilize Affordable Care Act marketplaces would ensure that subsidies paid to insurance companies benefit consumers rather than padding the companies' profits.

Jesus Campos, the Mandalay Bay security guard who was the first victim the night that Stephen Paddock rained bullets on people in Las Vegas, gave his first — and possibly last — media interview, to Ellen DeGeneres on The Ellen DeGeneres Show.

While there were no major revelations in the interview, which airs Wednesday, Campos' account added fresh detail to a timeline of events that law enforcement officials are still working to understand.

This story was originally posted by member station KQED.

A bipartisan group of more than 140 of some of California's most powerful women — including lawmakers, lobbyists and consultants — are calling out pervasive sexual harassment in politics and across all industries, penning a public letter with one simple message: Enough.

Pez diablo: "devil fish." That's what locals in the Mexican state of Tabasco call the armored catfish that has invaded their waters.

Also known as suckermouths, the species is popular with aquarium owners because the fish eats the algae that pollute tanks. But in the wild, that same behavior erodes shorelines and devastates underwater plant life.

A Mexican social enterprise called Acari is trying to do something about it — by creating a taste for these aquatic terrors.

What a difference five years can make.

Updated at 11:10 a.m. ET

Gord Downie, singer of The Tragically Hip, died of complications from brain cancer Tuesday night at the age of 53. His death was announced in a statement from his family.

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