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EPA Says Creek Contamination Focused on 3 Injection Wells

The Environmental Protection Agency says it has narrowed the source of salt contamination in an Osage County creek to three nearby oil and natural gas injection wells. The Tulsa World reports the contamination was first reported in August 2016 when an oily sheen appeared on North Bird Creek on the Chapman Ranch in Osage County, a few miles from the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve. The contaminated water would be deadly to cattle and horses. Ranch operators moved livestock about two miles away from...

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KWGS News

KWGS Takes Home 1st Place Honors

The professional chapter of the Oklahoma Society of Professional Journalists presented KWGS with First Place Awards for radio News Broadcast and Talk Show/Interview program at its annual banquet Saturday evening in Stillwater. Studio Tulsa with Richard Fisher, produced by Scott Gregory, was named the best interview program in the state. KWGS was also presented First Place honors for its local news cast during Morning Edition with John Durkee, Marshall Stewart and Matt Trotter. KWGS was the...

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Trump's First 100 Days: An 'Entry-Level' Presidency

With any new president, there's a learning curve. But for President Trump, it's been steeper than others. "Mount Everest" is how Barbara Perry, director of presidential studies at the Miller Center at the University of Virginia, described it ahead of Trump's 100 th day in office, which is coming up Saturday, April 29. "It's as steep as they come and ice-covered, and he didn't bring very many knowledgeable Sherpas with him." Trump's ascension to the presidency is an unlikely story. The flashy...

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Student Loans: You've Got Questions, We've Got Answers

With student debt at a staggering $1.3 trillion, many families are facing a huge financial dilemma: their final springtime decisions about college enrollment and acceptance. The NPR Ed team teamed up with Weekend Edition to answer some listener questions about debt and degrees. Waiting on the numbers Marcy, from Union City, N.J. has twin girls going off to college in September. "My question is: Why is it that universities and colleges wait so long to give the financial aid package? First...

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The Give and Take on Education with Oklahoma State Superintendent Joy Hofmeister, Sand Springs Assistant Superintendent Rob Miller, and Tulsa City Councilor Anna America

On the Next All This Jazz: Music of the Earth...on Earth Day

Listen for the next All This Jazz, starting at 9pm on Saturday the 22nd , right here on KWGS -FM / Public Radio Tulsa. We'll hear from the likes of Ronnie Cuber, Clark Terry, Barbara Carroll, and Chicho Hamilton, to name a few. And our third-hour theme -- r unning from 11pm until midnight, on Earth Day, no less -- will be Earth Tunes ; thus we'll dig Woody Herman's "The Good Earth," Ingrid Jensen's "Here on Earth," Sun Ra's "Planet Earth," and so forth. Every Saturday night, both online and...

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This Land Sings: Songs of Wandering, Love, and Protest

Sunday, April 23 at 4:00 p.m. on Classical 88.7 KWTU

StudioTulsa

In 1938, Dr. Sigmund Tobias (who was a toddler at the time) and his family were forced to flee from their native Berlin, Germany, to one of the poorest districts of Shanghai, China, where they lived as refugees along with 17,000 other European Jews for more than a decade. Dr. Tobias is our guest today on StudioTulsa. He will share his moving personal story as the featured speaker for the Tulsa Council for Holocaust Education's 20th Annual Yom HaShoah / Interfaith Holocaust Commemoration, which happens tomorrow night (Thursday the 20th) at Congregation B’nai Emunah.

On today's StudioTulsa -- that is, on Tax Day 2017 -- we are joined by T.R.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we get to know Robin Steinberg, a New York City-based public defender who founded the nonprofit Bronx Defenders in the late 1990s. This organization is still known for its model of "holistic defense," in which clients are advocated for by an interdisciplinary team of professionals (legal and otherwise) who address the underlying causes as well as the collateral consequences of our criminal-justice system. As Steinberg tells us, in January of this year, the Bronx Defenders opened a smaller-scale satellite office in North Tulsa called Still She Rises.

On this installment of ST, we speak with the British author and historian Huw Lewis-Jones, who is one of the editors (along with his wife, Kari Herbert) of a striking and engaging new book, "Explorers' Sketchbooks: The Art of Discovery and Adventure." As was noted of this book in a starred review in Library Journal: "The intersection of adventure, art, and memoir doesn't get any better than this title, edited by polar guides and husband-and-wife team Lewis-Jones and ­Herbert.

Our guest on ST today is Eileen Bradshaw, Executive Director of the Community Food Bank of Eastern Oklahoma. The Food Bank, as it's commonly known, is the largest private hunger-relief organization in eastern Oklahoma; it's been around since 1981. As is noted at this special nonprofit's website: "Our vision is food security, with dignity, for all eastern Oklahomans.... With locations in Tulsa and McAlester, we provide food and other donated goods to 450 Partner Programs in 24 counties of eastern Oklahoma.

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His Teacher Told Him He Wouldn't Go To College, Then He Did

9 hours ago

One day Ronnie Sidney, from Tappahannock, Va., was goofing off with his classmates in math when one of them threw a football at the board — and it landed a little too close to the teacher. Sidney says the ninth-grade teacher, visibly frustrated, turned around and said, " 'None of you are going to college.' "

After years working as a nurse in critical care units, Anne Webster found herself lying in the hospital struggling to get well. She had been given the wrong dose of a chemotherapy medication to treat Crohn's disease. The mistake had caused her bone marrow to shut down, and she'd developed pneumonia.

As she lay in the hospital, she thought, "If I live, I'm gonna write about this."

After three weeks, she recovered. And the experience led Webster to write Chemo Brain, a poem about how the drug scrambled her thinking.

My grandfather worked in coal and copper mines for 26 years doing back-breaking, dirty work that allowed him to support a family of nine children, purchase several acres of land, and become a community leader. (For several years leading up to World War II, he was the head of the Republican Committee in Rock Springs, Wyoming.)

When Jewish couple Mikey Franklin and Sonya Shpilyuk hung a "Black Lives Matter" banner from the window of their condominium, they hoped to voice their solidarity with the social justice movement. Instead, the backlash to their small act of resistance was swift. Two days later, their car was egged and toilet paper was strewn across a tree in front of their property.

Erin Moran, best known for playing Joanie Cunningham on the 1970s sitcom, Happy Days, is dead at age 56.

The Harrison County Sheriff's Department says Moran was found unresponsive after Indiana authorities received a 911 call Saturday afternoon. In a short press release, the Department did not give a presumed cause of death, but said an autopsy is pending.

Born in Burbank, Calif., Moran shot to fame in 1974 after she was cast as the younger sister to Ron Howard's character, Richie Cunningham, in Happy Days.

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