Top Stories

Supreme Court Revives Parts Of Trump's Travel Ban As It Agrees To Hear Case

The Supreme Court says it will decide the fate of President Trump's revised travel ban, agreeing to hear arguments over immigration cases that were filed in federal courts in Hawaii and Maryland and allowing parts of the ban that has been on hold since March to take effect. The justices removed the two lower courts' injunctions against the ban "with respect to foreign nationals who lack any bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States," narrowing the scope of those...

Read More
KWGS News photo

3rd Kepler Trial Delayed at Least 24 Hours

A one-day delay is granted in the Shannon Kepler murder retrial. Kepler, a former Tulsa Police officer, is accused of killing his daughter's boy friend. Kepler's defense attorney asked the Oklahoma Supreme Court on Friday to postpone the trial that's scheduled to begin Monday in district court. Kepler is seeking a delay until the next county jury term starts in August. Defense attorney Richard O'Carroll cited concerns with the computerized jury selection process in the petition. Kepler is...

Read More

School Vouchers Get 2 New Report Cards

Updated at 10:04 a.m. ET with Louisiana study It is the education debate of the Trump era. With the president and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos using policy and the bully pulpit to champion private school vouchers, supporters and critics have tangled over the question: Do low-income, public school students perform better when they're given a voucher to attend a private school? For years, the answer from researchers has been a muddle, while a handful of recent studies have clearly shown...

Read More

StudioTulsa

Theatre Tulsa -- founded in 1922 -- is the longest-running local theatre west of the Mississippi River, and the seventh oldest in the United States. To mark its 95th anniversary, the company will present a special presentation this weekend at the Tulsa PAC. The show, featuring a cast of one hundred or more, is called "Local Landmark, National Treasure: An Epic Concert Celebrating 95 Years of Theatre Tulsa" -- and it will be staged June 23rd and 24th at 8pm, and then on the 25th at 2pm.

(Note: This program originally aired last year.) On this installment of ST, we chat with the British writer Kate Hamer, whose first novel has appeared here in the U.S. to widespread acclaim. "The Girl in the Red Coat," as an Amazon reviewer has noted of this book, recounts what is basically "every parent's nightmare: Beth, a single mother, takes her 8-year-old daughter, Carmel, to a local festival for some fun and frivolity and she vanishes. What follows is an unusual and terrifying journey for them both.

(Note: This program first aired in April.) On this installment of ST, we speak with the British author and historian Huw Lewis-Jones, who is one of the editors (along with his wife, Kari Herbert) of an engaging book called "Explorers' Sketchbooks: The Art of Discovery and Adventure." As was noted of this book in a starred review in Library Journal: "The intersection of adventure, art, and memoir doesn't get any better than this title, edited by polar guides and husband-and-wife team Lewis-Jones and ­Herbert.

(Note: This program first aired back in February.) On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we chat with Dr. Ronald Epstein about his book, "Attending: Medicine, Mindfulness, and Humanity." As was noted of this reflective and quite timely medical memoir by Kirkus Reviews: "Can the encounter between doctor and patient be improved? A renowned family physician thinks so, and he explains how in this compendium of a lifetime of experience.

On this installment of ST, we welcome Brett McKay, a native Tulsan whose "Art of Manliness" blog gets about 10 million visitors each month.

More StudioTulsa

The first book of the Harry Potter series went on sale in the U.K. 20 years ago today. It offers a convenient excuse to reacquaint yourself with a world before anyone on this side of the Atlantic had heard of muggles, horcruxes or pensieves, before tourists would crowd into London's Kings Cross railway station simply to peer wistfully at the space between Platforms Nine and Ten.

Here's the first story NPR ever aired about Harry Potter — a wonderful piece by the late Margot Adler, from All Things Considered in 1998.

Some gems, from that bygone era:

Transportation Security Administration agents at Logan Airport's Terminal C in Boston snapped to attention Sunday, when they came across a live 20-pound lobster lurking in a cooler among the checked luggage.

"The lobster was screened and allowed to continue on its way," TSA spokesman Michael McCarthy tells NPR in an email.

He tweeted about it Monday saying, "@TSA officers are skilled at screening all sorts of items in checked baggage...including this 20+ pound lobster at @BostonLogan."

Google will no longer scan emails in Gmail accounts in order sell targeted advertising, the company said Friday.

Advances in technology have made it much easier, faster and less expensive to do whole genome sequencing — to spell out all three billion letters in a person's genetic code. Falling costs have given rise to speculation that it could soon become a routine part of medical care, perhaps as routine as checking your blood pressure.

But will such tests, which can be done for as little as $1,000, prove useful, or needlessly scary?

In Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, Titus Andromedon is a show-stealing character. Tituss Burgess plays the mostly out-of-work actor who's black, gay and an endearing friend to the very naive Kimmy Schmidt.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Updated at 8:10 pm ET

Congressional forecasters say a Senate bill that aims to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act would leave 22 million more people uninsured by 2026.

That's only slightly fewer uninsured than a version passed by the House in May.

In a surreal turn, a judge in Madrid ordered that Salvador Dalí's body — interred for nearly three decades — be exhumed after a 61-year-old Spanish woman claimed the renowned painter was her father.

María Pilar Abel Martínez, born in 1956 in Girona, said her mother, Antonia, had a secret affair with the mustachioed surrealist while working as a maid for a neighboring family on Spain's northeast coast, reports the BBC.

Abel said her mother told her several times that Dalí was her father.

Support for same-sex marriage is growing — even among groups traditionally opposed to it — according to a new survey by the Pew Research Center. The report, based on a survey conducted earlier this month, suggests public opinion is shifting quickly, two years after the Supreme Court's Obergefell v.

Passengers at Boston's Logan International Airport were surfing their phones and drinking coffee, waiting to board a flight to Aruba recently when a JetBlue agent came on the loudspeaker, announcing: "Today, we do have a unique way of boarding."

On flights to the Caribbean island, JetBlue is experimenting with facial recognition software that acts as a boarding pass. The airline says it's about convenience. For the federal government, it's also about national security. But for privacy activists, it's an intrusive form of surveillance.

Pages