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Manchester Concert Bombing: What We Know Tuesday

Updated at 10:45 a.m. ET A bombing at the end of an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England, has killed 22 people and injured 59 more, police say. Monday night's concert had drawn thousands of children and young people — many of whom were trying to leave when the blast hit. Authorities say it was a terrorist attack, carried out by a man who died at the Manchester Arena. Into Tuesday morning, parents were still trying to determine the status of their loved ones who were at the American...

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Despite Ban, Oklahoma House Approves $100M Revenue Bill

Despite a constitutional prohibition on passing revenue bills in the final week of session, the Oklahoma House approved a plan to generate about $100 million by limiting the amount of itemized deductions Oklahoma taxpayers can claim on their tax returns. The bill approved Monday caps deductions at $17,000 per year, excluding charitable deductions. It passed on a 56-40 vote and now heads to the Senate for approval. The bill faced bipartisan opposition from lawmakers who said it would affect...

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GOP Bill Could Undercut Some Coverage In Job-Based Insurance

Would the House Republican health care bill impact insurance provided by employers? And why don't people without insurance just go to an emergency room for regular care? Here are answers to those and other recent questions from readers. Will employer-based health care be affected by the new Republican plan? The American Health Care Act bill that recently passed the House would fundamentally change the individual insurance market, and it could significantly alter coverage for people who get...

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StudioTulsa

On this edition of our show, we speak with Dr. Rachel Pearson about her new book, "No Apparent Distress: A Doctor's Coming-of-Age on the Front Lines of American Medicine." As was noted of this reflective and well-written book by Kirkus Reviews: "[In this book] a sensitive doctor describes her beginnings navigating the unpredictable, woolly world of modern American health care. Pearson’s inspired collective of illuminating clinical episodes immediately sparks to life with anecdotes from her early work in a female-owned and -operated abortion clinic in her 20s.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we learn about "The Light Fantastic, or In the Wood," a new play that will be staged by the locally based Heller Theatre Company tonight (the 19th), tomorrow night (the 20th), and Sunday afternoon (the 21st) at the Nightingale Theatre in downtown Tulsa, which is located at 1416 East 4th St. Our guests are David Blakely, who wrote this play, and Susan Apker, who is the president of Heller Theatre Company (or HTC).

Last night, a jury here in Tulsa acquitted one Betty Shelby -- a white Tulsa Police officer -- who had been charged with first-degree manslaughter after she shot and killed an unarmed black man named Terence Crutcher last September. Some people in this community feel that justice has been served, while others feel, as was stated by Rev. Joey Crutcher, the victim's father, after the verdict came down: "I believe in my heart that Betty Shelby got away with murder." Where does Tulsa go from here?

This edition of ST features a discussion with José Torres-Tama, the New Orleans-based performance artist who will soon present his Taco Truck Theater / Teatro Sin Fronteras project at Living Arts of Tulsa. This production will be staged on Thursday and Friday, the 18th and 19th, with both shows starting at 8pm. Also on our program is the local poet Amairani Perez, who will be one of the Tulsa-based artists participating in this project.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we learn about the Oklahoma Bike Summit 2017, which will happen later this week (the 19th and 20th) in Muskogee and Tahlequah -- and which will, per its website, focus "on attaining physical and mental well-being through bicycling. It will address bicycling for individuals with disabilities, as spiritual and emotional healing process, and to improve the health of a whole community." Our guest is Jayme Brown, who will give an address entitled "Ride to Recovery: Cycling as Rehabilitation" at this summit.

More StudioTulsa

Thursday at Noon and Friday at 8:00 p.m. on Public Radio 89.5

Civil rights advocates and Democrats are celebrating after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday that the Republican-controlled North Carolina legislature had drawn two congressional districts that amount to unconstitutional racial gerrymanders. Election experts say the decision is likely to boost the prospects for success in similar challenges across the South.

Harry Friedman has run a consultancy training entry-level retail workers in customer service and other basics for 35 years. But in all his years, he has not retrained retail workers for new skills.

"Nope; we do none of it," he says. "I don't know that anybody does any of it."

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Would the House Republican health care bill impact insurance provided by employers? And why don't people without insurance just go to an emergency room for regular care? Here are answers to those and other recent questions from readers.

Will employer-based health care be affected by the new Republican plan?

Dina Merrill was born Nedenia Marjorie Hutton on Dec. 9, 1923, into a life of high society.

Her father was Wall Street broker E.F. Hutton and her mother was cereal heiress Marjorie Merriweather Post. Her parents divorced when she was 10 years old.

A 2010 exhibit at the Legion of Honor Museum in San Francisco showcased precious pieces that the French jeweler Cartier made for America's mega-rich.

In 1983, an explosive story appeared in an Indian newspaper, The Patriot: the AIDS virus was the result of American biological weapons research.

Two years later a Soviet newspaper picked up the thread: The U.S. Army had developed AIDS as a bioweapon at Fort Detrick, Md. Other publications followed suit and by 1986, an East German biology professor was publishing "research" in which he explained that the virus had been tested on service members used as human guinea pigs — who then began spreading it among vulnerable populations.

A rare outbreak of botulism has hospitalized nine people and killed one man in northern California, health officials say.

The outbreak began early last month when several people fell ill after eating nacho cheese sauce bought at a gas station in Walnut Grove, Calif., just outside Sacramento.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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