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Trump Expected To Order 4,000 More Troops To Afghanistan

President Trump is expected to deploy about 4,000 more troops to Afghanistan and try to tighten expectations on its government and that of neighboring Pakistan, senior U.S. officials tell NPR. Trump is scheduled to deliver a speech on Monday night outside Washington in which he announces his decision, which follows months of deliberation with top U.S. commanders, political advisers and even enlisted veterans of the nearly 16-year war. Trump is not expected to include any end date to the...

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Northern Oklahoma College

Analysis Puts Oklahoma School Among Top 10 Community Colleges in U.S.

New rankings say 4,500 student Northern Oklahoma College is the eighth-best community college in the U.S. WalletHub's analysis of 728 institutions is based on factors such as tuition and fees, education outcomes, and starting salaries after graduation. NOC President Cheryl Evans said the rankings recognize things the college does well. "Our students transfer successfully to four-year institutions, and also they get great outcomes if they're going straight to the workforce," Evans said. The...

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In Turkey, Schools Will Stop Teaching Evolution This Fall

When children in Turkey head back to school this fall, something will be missing from their textbooks: any mention of evolution. The Turkish government is phasing in what it calls a values-based curriculum. Critics accuse Turkey's president of pushing a more conservative, religious ideology — at the expense of young people's education. At a playground in an upscale, secular area of Istanbul, parents and grandparents express concern over the new policy. "I'm worried, but I hope it changes by...

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The Women Behind The 'Alt-Right'

Last weekend, when white nationalists descended on Charlottesville to protest, it was clear that almost exclusively white, young males comprised the so-called alt-right movement — there were women, but very few. So where were the white women who weren't out protesting in the streets? For the most part, journalist Seyward Darby discovered, they're online. "It wasn't easy" seeking out the women of the alt-right, Darby tells NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro. "I spent a lot of time in the underbelly of...

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StudioTulsa

On this installment of ST Medical Monday, an interesting conversation with Dr. Justin Feinstein, who's a clinical neuropsychologist at Tulsa's Laureate Institute for Brain Research (or LIBR) as well as an assistant professor of psychology in TU's Oxley College of Health Sciences. Dr. Feinstein also directors the "Float Clinic" at LIBR, which studies how and why floating in a foot or so of water -- to which has been added more than a ton of Epsom Salt -- can aid those who suffer from acute stress, high-level anxiety, PTSD, and similar afflictions.

On this edition of ST, we welcome the Tulsa-based author Jennifer Latham back to our show. Her recently published YA novel, "Dreamland Burning," is a suspenseful narrative about the Tulsa Race Riot. As was noted of this book in an appreciative review from School Library Journal: "Latham follows up 'Scarlett Undercover' with a rich work that links past and present in a tale that explores racial prejudice. After the remains of a skeleton are found in her Tulsa, OK, backyard, 17-year-old Rowan Chase becomes consumed with finding out the story behind the death.

On this edition of ST, after the tornado activity we saw here in Tulsa earlier this month, we're talking about what local small businesses can do to protect themselves from damage caused by flooding, storms, tornadoes, and other natural disasters. Our guest is Dave Hall, Chair of the Disaster Resistant Business Council, which is a part of the Disaster Resilience Network (formerly known as Tulsa Partners).

Our guest is Marcus Eriksen, a naturalist, author, and environmental activist whose latest book -- "Junk Raft" -- details his 2008 sea voyage on a craft made from plastic bottles and other recycled materials; it's a trek he made in order to demonstrate the blight of plastic waste in the world’s oceans.

Last week's Oklahoma Supreme Court decision invalidating the State Legislature's cigarette cessation fee means that there's now a $214 million budget deficit in this year's budget. This gives Oklahoma lawmakers two options: go back into special session to fix the state budget, or else three state agencies -- the Oklahoma Health Care Authority, the Department of Human Services, and the Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services -- will have to rewrite their budgets to account for a roughly $70 million cut to each agency. So, what will state lawmakers do?

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Copyright 2017 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

You probably know the feeling: Sometimes while you're riding through empty city streets at night, wind whipping past as the lamps thread your path forward, it can feel as if the very road is opening up before you.

Here's a feeling you probably don't know: the road literally opening up before you.

Updated at 2:25 p.m. ET

Police have shot and killed Younes Abouyaaqoub, the alleged driver of a van that plowed into pedestrians last week in Barcelona, Catalonia's president confirmed Monday. He said the suspect was wearing what turned out to be a fake explosives belt.

If a famine occurs, aid groups send food. If there's a war, they set up health clinics.

But what to do in event of a massive cyberattack? A new disease epidemic?

A July report has an alarming message for the aid community: adapt or be left in the dust.

Updated at 11:27 am ET

President Trump is set to deliver a prime-time address to the nation on Afghanistan Monday night. The speech marks a dramatic return for the president after his none-too-restful "working vacation."

The getaway was marked by another staff shakeup and controversy over Trump's remarks on the deadly white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va.

The U.S. State Department says it will temporarily stop issuing nonimmigrant visas to Russians in response to Moscow's decision to force the U.S. to slash its diplomatic and technical staff in Russia.

The American Embassy in Moscow and consulates elsewhere in Russia are cancelling interviews for visa requests and suspending all nonimmigrant visa operations until Sept. 1, NPR's Michele Kelemen reports. After that date, the issuance of nonimmigrant visas will resume at the embassy in Moscow, but not at the other consulates, Michele says.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

One person is dead and at least one other injured after a van rammed into two separate bus shelters in the French port city of Marseille. Authorities say they are not treating the incident as terrorism.

The vehicle hit people waiting at the bus stops a few blocks apart along the city's scenic waterfront.

A police source tells Reuters that the driver has been taken into custody. The 35-year-old suspect has psychological issues and is known to authorities for petty crimes, the source says.

Updated at 10:30 a.m. ET

An international air-sea rescue has been launched in waters off Singapore for 10 missing U.S. sailors after a collision between the guided-missile destroyer USS John S. McCain and an oil tanker.

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