Top Stories

Cleveland County Detention Center

Shortey Steps Down Amid Scandal with Teen

An Oklahoma state senator accused of hiring a 17-year-old boy for sex has resigned. Republican Sen. Ralph Shortey submitted his resignation letter Wednesday. He was arrested last week on charges of engaging in child prostitution, transporting a minor for prostitution and engaging in prostitution within 1 ,000 feet of church. The 35-year-old married father of three is out on $100,000 bond. Oklahoma's most prominent Republican leaders had called for his resignation after he was charged. Acting...

Read More
Matt Trotter / KWGS

Biggest Pieces of Gathering Place Playground Arrive on Site

A caravan of trucks with a police escort delivered Wednesday the major pieces of the playground to A Gathering Place for Tulsa. Two metal frames and four wooden towers — some roughly five stories tall — made the trip from the east Tulsa warehouse they’ve been at for the past year. Before that, they were being made in Germany by play equipment firm Richter Spielgerate. Julian Richter said he’s proud to finally see the structures at the park. "Our company is a small company. We are based in a...

Read More

Attacker In London Kills 3, Injures 20 Before Being Shot Dead Near Parliament

Updated at 5:10 p.m. ET In a midday attack near the U.K. Parliament building, an assailant killed two civilians and a police officer before being shot to death, British authorities say. At least 20 people were injured in the attack, which police describe as a terrorist incident. Authorities say they believe there was a single attacker, driving a vehicle and armed with at least one knife. Prime Minister Theresa May condemned the attack as "sick and depraved" in remarks on Wednesday evening....

Read More

Gorsuch Hearing For Top Court Lacks The High Drama Of Those In Recent Past

In a hearing that stretched through nearly 12 hours Tuesday, the Supreme Court nomination of Neil Gorsuch took a long step toward Senate confirmation. Barring an utterly unforeseen reversal when the questioning resumes Wednesday, observers expect Judiciary Committee approval along party lines on April 3 and a similar win on the Senate floor. Twenty senators took turns asking questions for half an hour each. The Republicans tried to get the country to share their affinity for the nominee. The...

Read More

Six Southwood- grown herbs of your choice!

Tune in for the one hour recap, NPR's special of the Senate Judiciary proceedings TONIGHT at 7:00 p.m. on Public Radio 89.5

StudioTulsa

This coming weekend -- on March 24th, 25th, and 26th -- Tulsa Ballet will present "Swan Lake," the classic 19th-century ballet, with music by Tchaikovsky, about a young maiden who has been trapped in the form of a swan by an evil sorcerer's curse. Our guest on StudioTulsa is Marcello Angelini, the Artistic Director of Tulsa Ballet, who tells us about this new production. It's a piece he knows very well, having danced it scores of times as a young dancer in his native Italy and then, later, as a member of the Kiev Institute of Dance in the former Soviet Union.

On this installment of ST Medical Monday, a discussion of the sport of rowing -- how it works, what its health and fitness benefits are, how it has developed as a competitive sport, and so on. Our guest is Micah Hartwell, a lecturer in the Dept. of Health & Human Performance at OSU Tulsa who's also the Nutrition Services Program Director for Tulsa CARES as well as the Varsity Men's Rowing Coach for the Tulsa Youth Rowing Association. As Hartwell tells us, this is a sport that draws upon all of one's muscle groups, and that one can safely practice throughout life.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we welcome Steve Liggett back to our program. A well-known figure on the local arts scene, Liggett is an art teacher and sculptor who's also the director of the nonprofit Living Arts of Tulsa, which was established in the 1960s by Virginia Myers and others as a haven for the creation and display of contemporary art right here in T-Town.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we speak with with Laura Fry, the Senior Curator and Curator of Art at the Gilcrease Museum. She tells us about two special exhibitions now on view at the museum: "Looking West: The Rumley Family Collection" (which will close on the 19th, this coming Sunday) and "Creating the Modern Southwest" (which will close at the end of this year).

On this edition of ST, we offer a wide-ranging chat with Bill Leighty, the executive director of Smart Growth Tulsa, which was founded in April of 2014 and incorporated as a nonprofit just recently. This organization, per its website, is "committed to policies, not politics. We seek to create healthy communities that work for everyone, with strong schools and local businesses, improved mobility options and jobs that pay well....

More StudioTulsa

Congressional Healthcare Bill Response Tracker

Thursday will mark seven years since President Obama signed the now-threatened Affordable Care Act before a crowd in the jam-packed East Room of the White House. It was the signature legislative moment of his presidency, underscored by then-Vice President Biden, who whispered into the president's ear that it was a "big f****** deal." The mic picked up the remark, which created quite a stir.

The owner of a Massachusetts compounding pharmacy was acquitted on 25 counts of second-degree murder, but guilty of racketeering and fraud in the 2012 fungal meningitis outbreak that killed 64 people and hurt more than 700.

A jury found Barry Cadden, an owner of the now-defunct New England Compounding Center, guilty of some of the charges, but decided against holding him directly responsible for the deaths, which could have resulted in a life sentence for Cadden.

A few days ago, one of my students asked me what I was reading, so I told her about Jean Hanff Korelitz's new novel, called The Devil and Webster. My student's eyes got wider as I finished lightly summarizing the plot, and she said, with some concern about Korelitz: "I hope she's ready for all the angry tweets and emails."

Yeah, I think she probably is.

Copyright 2017 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

The Food and Drug Administration says at least nine women have died of a rare blood cancer after receiving breast implants, and that the agency is officially acknowledging an association between the implants and the disease.

On Tuesday, the agency announced that as of Feb. 1, it had received 359 breast implant-associated reports of a rare type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma called anaplastic large cell lymphoma, or ALCL.

Men may soon be able to take their own sperm count — at home. With a smartphone. Yes, there's an app for that.

You may be asking yourself, why?

Low sperm count is a marker for male infertility, a condition that is actually a neglected health issue worldwide, according to the World Health Organization.

Social Media Star Has A 'Crazy Idea' To Help Somalia

4 hours ago

A viral social media campaign to fight the looming famine in Somalia has already raised more than $2 million. The goal is to send 60 tons of food to the country. But as the campaign has unfolded, it's become clear that it's still a work in progress. With the distribution set for March 27, some critical details are changing or not yet available.

Phoebe Bridgers was one of our top discoveries going into SXSW, a quiet and powerful voice in the loud din of the festival. After she performed at Central Presbyterian Church, a favorite venue among our staff, Bridgers and percussionist Marshall Vore came to Bob Boilen's hotel room just before midnight to play the striking "Smoke Signals."

By a largely party-line vote Tuesday, the Senate approved a bill that repeals Obama-era hunting restrictions on national wildlife refuges in Alaska. The House already voted last month to abolish those restrictions — which were instituted by the Fish and Wildlife Service in 2016 to protect predator species from hunters — and so the bill now heads to the desk of President Trump, who is widely expected to sign it.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Pages